Posts by tehomet

Welcome to UKHIppy2764@2x.png

UKHippy is a long running online community and of likeminded people exploring all interpretations on what it means to be living an alternative lifestyle -- we welcome discussions on everything related to sustainability, the environment, alternative spirituality, music, festivals, politics and more -- membership of this website is free but supported by the community.

    Over here in Ireland, there's been a lot of controversy over AirBnB. I don't mean the questioning of whether AirBnB hosts are contributing to the lack of availability of housing, and the lack of profitability of traditional hotels, although there's that as well, I mean that AirBnB are fully compliant with the Revenue (tax department of the government, I don't know what you call it in England). So a lot of people who were hosting suddenly found the tax authorities knocking on their door, if they hadn't been declaring the income. That's no big deal, except for people who found this situation affected their social welfare entitlements, access to medical cards/assistance, and so on. I'm just saying, if you choose to run a business via AirBnB, be aware.

    My first thought was cargo trike (or bike plus bike trailer) and a bell tent. You might have to make the trike or get it made. Bell tents are transportable by trike or bike trailer and you can put a burner in them. They are also better adapted to high winds in my opinion than a caravan, but of course a lot depends on how you set things up.


    Or as Bernie suggested, get a caravan and ask someone to tow it for you.

    My VW campervan broke down a couple of times, a few years ago. The first time, I was within ten miles of a distant relative's house so she kindly put me up until the problem was fixed. We barely knew each other at the time but ever since then, we are close friends.


    The second time was while I was travelling abroad, heading from the Czech Republic to Italy. My van's gearbox seized up on the motorway. The tow truck took my van to the nearest garage which handled VW vehicles, which turned out to the Porsche garage in Salzburg, where there is an espresso bar and the mechanics wear white coats like doctors. It took a few days for the repairs, so the mechanics said to take a bus into the centre of town and look for the youth hostel. Luckily enough, the youth hostel had a bunk for me, and as it turns out, Salzberg is a lovely place to explore.

    I don't know about Wales but in Ireland, there's a category of development that is exempt from needing planning permission, subject to certain limits. So, for example, a house owner can build an extension to his or her house without getting planning permission providing it is within the limits, e.g. not taller than the original part of the structure, built in a harmonious style, under a certain amount of square metres in floor size, and so on. Might I suggest that one way would be to see if similar planning provisions exist in your country and see if you would be interested in building a house that is connected to your extended family's existing house? It needn't be internally connected, although the pipes and wiring might be for ease and affordability.


    My brother inherited the family farm, which wasn't near the family house (long story), and he lived in an existing caravan there for a while, then in a static caravan/mobile home, then he got married and with a baby on the way, applied for planning permission for an actual house, and was repeatedly turned down for PP on the grounds that the council didn't want to 'reward illegal behaviour' i.e. they disapproved of him having caravans etc on the land. Caravans etc don't need PP as long as you don't live in them, pretty much, but he had been living in them and so had various family members off and on over the years.


    I don't know what the planning authorities are like in Wales, but I would bear PP considerations in mind before rather than after moving onto the land in whatever arrangement you plan. It might be better in your own interest to get your ducks in a row before any PP application goes in, or just decide from the outset that you're going to work around PP regulations. My brother did eventually get PP after nearly a decade of expensive, stressful, and time-consuming applications, but not before nearly giving up in disgust. If his PP hadn't come through in the end, he would have sold the farm, and emigrated, with all the negative effects on the wider family that would have had. I wouldn't want anyone to have to go through all that stress.


    So, check your local council's planning permission website, or give them an (anonymous) call about exempted developments and extensions, if you wish. Might be worthwhile.


    Good luck!

    That sounds like a whole load of balderdash to me.


    Edit: Oh... sorry. That's not correct because you are in Ireland aren't you. *Shuts up*


    You are correct on both points: I am in Ireland, and yes, it is a whole load of balderdash! And a legal requirement, apparently. :(

    I've been lucky enough to adopt a lovely puppy who is a joy to the whole household. He was abandoned on a friend of a friend's doorstep so he ended up with me. I took him to the vet for a checkup and vaccinations and some treatment for a digestive system problem, and now he's very healthy and very nearly house-trained. He is sweet and gentle, gets on well with the other dogs, and once I manage to persuade him not to chew my shoes, all will be well.


    The only fly in the ointment is that someone told me that dogs of his type have to be muzzled in public. The vet says he's a Staffie cross and he's about nine months old, but didn't mention anything about muzzles. I looked the matter up in the statute book and apparently I do have to muzzle the dog when he is in public. What kind of muzzle do I have to use, if I have to use one, or rather what's the minimum I can legally get away with? Seems a bit pointless as he's more likely to lick someone than bite them and he's always walked on a lead. And does the law not kick in until he's a full grown dog rather than a puppy? I've always had dogs but they were usually mongrels of various delightful kinds so this never came up before.

    Obviously i wouldnt leave it with blood and guts lying everywhere and would leave it discretely well off the road but would i be legally responsible for properly disposing of the carcass after butchering it.


    To the best of my legal knowledge, not unless you'd deliberately killed the beastie yourself. If you just come across an unfortunate animal that's been killed on the road, you can bury, butcher, move, or ignore the poor thing as you see fit.

    while I was at the Greenham common festival end of the protest in the early 80s some one deposoted the intestines and other twiddly bits down a long drop , and it made a very well known member of the traveling community quite unwell , as he went for a crap tripping and for some reason looked down the drop afterwards and thought he had done himself a mischief :(


    Poor sod. No pun intended.

    I got this email from the NT (I'm a member even though I live in Ireland) and I have to say I have met cooked spaghetti with more backbone. I'm cancelling my membership.


    "[TABLE='width: 100%']

    [tr]


    [TD='width: 100%'][TABLE='width: 550, align: center']

    [tr]


    [TD='width: 550'][TABLE='width: 100%']

    [tr]


    [TD='width: 455'][TABLE='align: center']

    [tr]


    [td]

    Latest on our position on badgers and bovine TB and fracking

    [/td]


    [/tr]


    [tr]


    [td][/td]


    [/tr]


    [/TABLE]
    [/TD]

    [/tr]


    [/TABLE]
    [/TD]

    [/tr]


    [/TABLE]
    [/TD]

    [/tr]


    [/TABLE]
    [TABLE='width: 100%']

    [tr]


    [TD='width: 100%'][TABLE='width: 550, align: center']

    [tr]


    [TD='width: 550'][TABLE='width: 100%']

    [tr]


    [TD='width: 550'][/TD]

    [/tr]


    [/TABLE]
    [/TD]

    [/tr]


    [/TABLE]
    [/TD]

    [/tr]


    [/TABLE]
    [TABLE='width: 100%']

    [tr]


    [TD='width: 100%'][TABLE='width: 550, align: center']

    [tr]


    [TD='width: 550'][TABLE='width: 100%']

    [tr]


    [TD='width: 550']You may have followed recent AGM in Cardiff. I am writing to update you on our debate on badgers and bovine TB.
    [/TD]

    [/tr]


    [/TABLE]
    [/TD]

    [/tr]


    [/TABLE]
    [/TD]

    [/tr]


    [/TABLE]
    [TABLE='width: 100%']

    [tr]


    [TD='width: 100%'][TABLE='width: 550, align: center']

    [tr]


    [TD='width: 550'][TABLE='width: 100%']

    [tr]


    [TD='width: 550']This is an emotive and difficult issue. The National Trust is not pro culling badgers. The effectiveness is unproven and we have criticised the recent cull pilots. We are trialling vaccination at Killerton Estate and assessing its effectiveness. Whatever the Government eventually proposes, we want a package of measures backed by strong scientific evidence.
    [/TD]

    [/tr]


    [/TABLE]
    [TABLE='width: 100%']

    [tr]


    [TD='width: 100%'][TABLE='width: 550, align: center']

    [tr]


    [TD='width: 550'][TABLE='width: 100%']

    [tr]


    [TD='width: 550']You may also have seen misleading coverage of our position on renewable energy and fracking. Climate change is a long term threat to our properties so we are committed torenewable energy that works in the landscape. I want to reassure you that our position on fracking has not changed: if it were proposed today on our land, we would say no, because of the unknown environmental impacts.
    [/TD]

    [/tr]


    [/TABLE]
    [TABLE='width: 100%']

    [tr]


    [TD='width: 100%'][TABLE='width: 550, align: center']

    [tr]


    [TD='width: 550'][TABLE='width: 100%']

    [tr]


    [TD='width: 550']These are complex issues with no easy answers.
    [/TD]

    [/tr]


    [/TABLE]
    [TABLE='width: 100%']

    [tr]


    [TD='width: 100%'][TABLE='width: 550, align: center']

    [tr]


    [TD='width: 550'][TABLE='width: 100%']

    [tr]


    [TD='width: 550']Thank you for your support.
    [/TD]

    [/tr]


    [/TABLE]
    [TABLE='width: 100%']

    [tr]


    [TD='width: 100%'][TABLE='width: 550, align: center']

    [tr]


    [TD='width: 550'][TABLE='width: 100%']

    [tr]


    [TD='width: 550']Helen Ghosh
    Director-General



    [/TD]

    [/tr]


    [/TABLE]
    [/TD]

    [/tr]


    [/TABLE]
    [/TD]

    [/tr]


    [/TABLE]
    [/TD]

    [/tr]


    [/TABLE]
    [/TD]

    [/tr]


    [/TABLE]
    [/TD]

    [/tr]


    [/TABLE]
    [/TD]

    [/tr]


    [/TABLE]
    [/TD]

    [/tr]


    [/TABLE]
    [/TD]

    [/tr]


    [/TABLE]
    [/TD]

    [/tr]


    [/TABLE]
    [/TD]

    [/tr]


    [/TABLE]

    Has anyone had lodgers, or been a lodger, and could give me advice on how to go about things? Any pitfalls to avoid? I've been looking on the spareroom website for ideas, but of course any real experiences and ideas would be helpful.


    If you don't own your place and are renting, you might want to check your lease for whether it's okay to sub-let or not. You can still sub-let on the quiet if you have to, but it is not good for peace of mind (she says from bitter experience).


    I've been a lodger and had lodgers in the past. If you're easygoing and they're easygoing, there's no problem.


    Finding out if they really are easygoing is the hard part. I would suggest you spent at least an hour chatting with your prospective housemate to see if you can size them up. An hour's not much time to get to know someone but at least it gives you time to discuss each other's schedules and lifestyles, and be clear about common issues like: cleaning, parties, people staying over, utility bills, grocery bills, pets, noise. Meet them with a friend in a public place if possible, for safety. Go with your instinct. The best house shares I've had were with people I liked immediately and the worst were with people I didn't.


    Both of you should sign a tenancy agreement so you both know where you stand. If you wish to read the advice section of shelter.org.uk or https://www.gov.uk/private-ren…ghts-and-responsibilities you'll have the basics on your rights and responsibilities. You should be sure to get as large a rent and damages deposit as you can, not to be greedy, since you're going to give it back when they move out anyway, but since it's pretty much the only leverage you have against them trashing the place. Get landlord's insurance if possible, too. Have a lock on your bedroom door, at least until you and your housemate know each other better.


    Good luck with your clear-your-debts plan; it sounds good.

    Indeed. I belong to a minority religious subculture too, and it is a fact that the more fundamentalist groups within it have a higher rate of children with special needs, simply because of the limited size of the gene pool.


    It's interesting though how much less likely an Amish person is to get cancer. Swings and roundabouts, I guess.

    My sister keeps the chicken beasts and, as well as the fence, has a hen house in the run into which she encourages the chickens at twilight by bribing them with grub. Locks them up at night, lets them out in the morning. I think they run around my sister's smallholding during the day, and the run is for when she and her dog are off the property.


    I haven't heard of the urine deterrent before. I must tell her.