Posts by Bogwoppit

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    Hey guys. Long time no post I know, but we've been busy doing our lorry up and finding ways to get out of the pit that is Lincolnshire...


    So we're finally rolling down to Somerset in a couple of weeks... Anyone local to Bath/Glastonbury? Would be great to meet up :)


    Also, the lorry has no mot, tax or insurance... I know technically we can book an mot down there, but as our bricks address is up here I don't think they'd accept that if it came to it. Anyone have any experience of low loading vehicles at all? Price, difficulties etc. Just something I'm looking into :)

    Friend of mine is desperate to get away from an abusive husband and is looking for a van. She can only drive 3.5 ton and has no driving experience to speak of. She's got two young girls... LWB Merc I'm thinking? Does anyone know of anything ready to go as she has no experience of converting x

    Thanks Steve :) Yes, we take our Bengal out with us quite often in the van or the lorry, and we intend to take him with us when we go full time early next year. To be fair, a Bengal is more like a dog than a cat - he walks on a lead, follows me around the house, will sit on command etc - but we have another 'just' moggie who lives with us who also loves travelling. We're thinking about taking him too (he's not technically ours, next door left him when they moved and he lives with about three different households now) but he's getting on a bit and I'm not sure he would like living so closely with the dog and the other cat.


    Advice... get your cat walking on a harness and lead asap. Take him out on fun trips once he can do that - to the park or woods where he can have a good walk. Always always give him a treat or feed him when he gets back in the vehicle. If you can, get him to come to the vehicle to be fed before you go away in it. Start the engine as you feed him, then gradually begin to start the engine as a sign that food is on its way. That will get him used to coming back when he hears the engine start once you do feel confident enough to let him out on his own. Make sure he has a safe, enclosed place in the vehicle that he can go to when he feels unsure. Our boy is happiest, once he's explored, in his box or curled up in some blankets.


    It can be done, but it does take longer than with a dog, and you must be very consistent with your training.


    Good luck! :hippy:

    Fallingonabruise I had the exact same LDV that I did out as a camper. Best thing I ever did, he ran forever, no problems whatsoever and warm as anything even in Winter. I just used two layers of that silver bubble wrap stuff all over :mrgreen:


    The only thing I will say... you mention the brakes - just be very aware of brake problems and keep up to date on all things brake related. They are prone to that sort of thing x

    I'd love to contact them to film us doing our horse box... then they would know what 'on a tight budget' was, lol. But as Jay says, no one is actually making anything to live in - this is because they wouldn't be allowed to show anything that's 'illegal'.


    And to be fair, it's called 'Amazing Spaces', not, 'Build your Own Home for £50'. Though our idea of budgets and most of the people on there do differ vastly I have to admit :mrgreen:

    Wish I could have given you the other lorry mate! He's gone to a lovely lady though who we might see around here soon... I told her about this place and she's very keen to go on holiday in the lorry as well as take her horses out in it :D


    You will find something. If not we'll stick our caravan behind ours and you can live in that :pp

    Anyway... we're thinking about doing up the horse box, and I reckon we're going to go away from the kitchen at the back thing that people usually do in them and have the kitchen and shower/toilet at the front, wood burner in the middle and living space at the back so we can open the French windows (yes we are going to be that posh!) out onto the decking/ramp. That way we can do the front bit now while the back is still a horse box, and then when we decide to go for the full time living in it all we need to do is get rid of the horse wee smell.insulate and stick a bookcase and sofa in :D

    He he, thank you :D I would be most grateful if you would tweek it for me when you get a chance. There's no rush for it to be in as we don't intend to go before next Easter at least, if we go at all. I just wanted to make sure there would be nothing holding us back if we do decide to take him with us.


    Thanks hun, much appreciated x

    This will be my reply:


    Dear Mrs Baxter


    Thank you or looking into this for me. Unfortunately registering at another school for what would be a matter of weeks seems a bit pointless.


    I don't think you quite understood what I was asking when we spoke. I'm not asking permission to register Ryan as Nomadic. I'm telling you I will be registering him as Nomadic.


    This is the Law where nomadic children are concerned:


    The special position of Traveller families was recognised by section 199 of the Education Act 1993 and confirmed by the 1996 Education Act subsection 6 of Section 444. Traveller parents are protected from conviction if the parent can demonstrate that:


    he is engaged in a trade or business of such a nature as requires him to travel from place to place;
    the child has attended at a school as a registered pupil as regularly as the nature of that trade or business permits;
    where the child has attained the age of six years, he has made at least 200 attendances (i.e. 200 sessions or half days) during the preceding twelve months.
    This paragraph is The most important of all when the school dispute that you are a 'traveller'


    This next paragraph is also VERY important when it comes to markings in the register


    The Issue


    Categorising absence accurately is important both for the school and the family. For the school it may affect their position in the league tables and for the family it may lead to enforcement action including prosecution.


    The Law


    The DfEE School Attendance Policy document allows absence whilst the child is travelling away on family business or for cultural reasons to be marked as authorised suggested with the code (T).

    (T) stands for Travelling, not Traveller.


    Where Traveller children are on site or in a house and not attending school, the law is the same as for anybody else and the particular circumstances should be investigated.


    Distance learning is not currently recognised as an approved educational activity off site so cannot be marked as such.



    There is a very real possibility that my partner and myself will have to travel away for work next year, in which case Ryan will be coming with us. If this happens, then we will of course provide evidence of this, and do not expect Ryan's absences (kept to a minimum of course) to be marked down or investigated, as per the Law. While the government are attempting to change said law, and as such I can understand the education welfare officer attempting to dissuade us from doing so, as it stands at the moment, we are quite within our rights.


    Kind regards

    Does that sound ok?




    Thank you Gyro... that pack would be most useful if you wouldn't mind sending me the link please? (Or post, whichever is easiest for you... let me know and I'll PM you my address).


    So it's not up to the school to allow me to register Ryan nomadic then? I just do it? Do we have to prove we go away for work? Is there anything I can take in and show the school to prove that it's legal for me to do this?


    That is good advice Twister, and very true. As you know I agree whole heartedly with your views on child management as it were. I just wish I'd had the chance to do it all when they were both small to save this hassle now!

    We've just got round to watching The Tudors, which I didn't think I'd like but it's actually quite good :)


    I'm gutted that I've already watched all of BSG, Firefly, all the Stargates, Farscape et al... I'd love there to be another really good Sci-Fi series :(

    The concept of this sounds terrific. Personally, as I`ve expressed to others.... I simply dont have the spunk in me to "go it alone" so to speak... and I suppose in lots of ways...i`m inexperienced in this way of living.
    The idea of being amongst like-minded people is very appealing.
    With me... I sort of need "pushing"...cajoling sort of...and once i`m in a position---I`m fine...but being a bit older---I`m "scared" a bit I suppose.


    den


    I'm exactly the same... the idea of going in with others sounds ideal - my partner and I are planning to go travelling/live in our lorry in a few years anyway, so something like this would be a good start.

    My nephew has a Peugeot Partner van. He put a bed in the back under which his kayak fits perfectly, with enough room for stuff as well. He was only 19 when he got it and I know it was the cheapest vehicle he could find to insure as he did all his homework before he bought it :)

    i think it's so important to remember here that people, including children, do not fit into boxes and what's right for one child will not be right for the next.
    before either of my kids started infant schooll we discussed home ed and for reasons of our own chose conventional schooling.
    many times over the years i have questioned our choice from all those years ago (my youngest is now yr 11 and my eldest yr 13), and i've sometimes thought my youngest would have been better being home ed, but i have no doubt that school was the right choice for my eldest, both educationally and socially, she has always loved school and fits perfectly in to the social side of it, having always had a group of close friends, been involved in school council type stuff, been part of sports clubs and teams, and she also wants to do a law degree so she needs A level grades that i could not have helped her to get...........


    children thrive in all kinds of different situations and learn in different ways. i agree that school may not be the best option for a lot of them, but it can be the best option for some.


    Good luck Woppit :thumbup:


    Thanks hun :) Mine are exactly the same - my eldest loves school and her friends and would miss out on a lot if she had been home ed. She has developed so much this last year - now taking it upon herself to seek out higher papers on subjects to get a head start on college courses etc. Youngest however might have got on well at home, but he would have not had the social interaction forced on him at school, so might be even more in his shell than ever! As it is he has found a small group of friends who are into gaming and books like him, so he gets on well, but had he not found those he may well have been bullied for not fitting in. Who knows? We can only do what's best, as you say, for the individual child, not put them in boxes any more than schools already do!


    IMO only the parent knows that child inside out, and therefore knows what is best for them, but also discusses that with them too! So many parents think they know what's best without bothering to ask (I have to say - mainly mainstream, conventional parents). I don't agree that all children whatever their age should decide what's right, as young children do need guidance, but at a certain age (again, different for each individual) they should be given the opportunity to express an informed opinion. Travellers and 'hippy' children more than most seem to be mature enough to make those decisions for themselves, rather than being told "we know best" like so many conventional families. All my daughter's friends apparently think I'm great and wish their mums were like me. When I asked why they say because I don't nag, I discuss things, and I give Tasha some really cool come-backs to say to teachers when they get on her back, lol :reddevil:


    I am so lucky that both my children have grown and continue to grow into well rounded, intelligent, inquisitive and imaginative people. Don't know if it's anything I've done and I don't much care so long as they continue to do what's right and best for them :)

    And that's it exactly... It's never too late to become what you want to be. Therefore even if you have 'missed out' on a formal education, there's no reason why you still can't fulfil your dream in later life. I certainly didn't know what I wanted to do until about five years ago (I'm 44!) and even that ideal is fluid and changes from day to day! Luckily, although I didn't work very hard at school, I did get a Grammar school education and therefore came out with a few O levels, so I will be able to go back to college when I finally decide on a course which suits me.


    Alices Wonderland is one of the most rounded, well-versed, intelligently spoken, knowledgeable (in life as well as in an academic sense) people I know, and has had a diverse mixture of jobs in the course of what seems a pretty idyllic (if not always easy) life. If either of my kids (with or without a formal education) turn out to be anything like that I'll be well chuffed :)


    I've just had this posted for me on FB:


    The Law


    The special position of Traveller families was recognised by section 199 of the Education Act 1993 and confirmed by the 1996 Education Act subsection 6 of Section 444. Traveller parents are protected from conviction if the parent can demonstrate that:


    he is engaged in a trade or business of such a nature as requires him to travel from place to place;
    the child has attended at a school as a registered pupil as regularly as the nature of that trade or business permits;
    where the child has attained the age of six years, he has made at least 200 attendances (i.e. 200 sessions or half days) during the preceding twelve months.
    This paragraph is The most important of all when the school dispute that you are a 'traveller'


    This next paragraph is also VERY important when it comes to markings in the register


    The Issue


    Categorising absence accurately is important both for the school and the family. For the school it may affect their position in the league tables and for the family it may lead to enforcement action including prosecution.


    The Law


    The DfEE School Attendance Policy document allows absence whilst the child is travelling away on family business or for cultural reasons to be marked as authorised suggested with the code (T).


    (T) stands for Travelling, not Traveller.


    Where Traveller children are on site or in a house and not attending school, the law is the same as for anybody else and the particular circumstances should be investigated.


    Distance learning is not currently recognised as an approved educational activity off site so cannot be marked as such.


    So basically yes Julian, you are correct :)

    Yes I do see what you're saying :) My daughter is just coming up to her GCSEs and wants to go into the police or become a psychologist (bit random!). Obviously I wouldn't take her out of school until she's finished her exams, and I'm encouraging her to go to a good college and hopefully uni after that. My boy will probably go to art college as that's his first love and he's brilliant (he wants to be a Lego designer!) so I don't see that talking him out of school for a week or so at a time will hurt. Tbh I can't imagine anyone whose children wanted to become doctors being hippies in any case!


    I agree in principal that children should be able to make that choice, but then again, forcing them to go to school isn't a choice.

    Asked around at work today and no, nothing like that will ever happen. Madrat is talking about the CPC which is what I said I've just done... as popuptoaster says, these only apply to professional PSV and LGV drivers :)

    You may have years of personal experience, but so have most adults travellers who choose to continue with their way of life. A lot of school time is, if I'm to be honest, a waste of time, in a great many schools. Our children can and do learn a great deal from ourselves and others during travelling times. The school prepares education packs and this is monitored. Tell me why should our son take constant lecturing about why he needs to be more Christian and not learn valuable, basic life & survival skills at a early age. Don't get me wrong, school has a place and can deliver valuable education. So can we. We are not talking home schooling, unless the education system cannot meet the needs of traveller children. We need schools to understand that this way of life, will need cooperation from both school, child and parent/s to maximize a child's potential.


    Well said :)


    agatha... In this instance we're not talking about constantly changing schools, we're talking about my partner and myself having to travel to work for possibly three or four weeks during the Summer months, some of which will be in school time, and me asking if my son can be either provided with work to do 'at home', or for me to home ed during that time. As Alices Wonderland says, most formal schooling is a waste of time, with nothing productive coming from it whatsoever. I too spend an awful lot of time around young people, both in and away from work. The travellers' children I have met generally grow to be far more rounded adults, with more common sense and survival ability than 'conventional' kids. I have no patience for the current fad of only employing people with a degree... they have no life experience and generally have no idea how to do the job they are given if it involves dealing with people or having common sense.

    I've not heard anything, and I've recently done my cpc for my PSV so I would have thought they might have mentioned it...