Posts by stupot

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UKHippy is a long running online community and of likeminded people exploring all interpretations on what it means to be living an alternative lifestyle -- we welcome discussions on everything related to sustainability, the environment, alternative spirituality, music, festivals, politics and more -- membership of this website is free but supported by the community.

    A very long time ago I worked in the body shop of a large motor dealership. Although mostly we'd replace damaged panels/doorskins etc sometimes we'd effect a repair using filler. Like I said in the previous post, if you do it correctly, you should have no problem with the rust reoccurring. Although we never used rust killer I always made a point of it when doing work on my own vehicles & always found it better than not. I remember patching up numerous rust blisters & dings on an old banger I owned which I then ended up keeping for about five years & the rust never came back. A good tip for sprucing your vehicles paintwork up (though this only applies to white paint) is to add a small amount of bleach to the water when you wash the vehicle - a couple of capfuls per bucket) & it will bring the paint up like new.


    Back to the bodywork thing. Success lies in the preparation. Take your time (spay not brush) & you will be rewarded with a panel which need no further attention.

    If its only cosmetic there's no need for it to be welded. You can arrest it's development though. Firstly sand over & about an inch beyond the rust then treat with a proprietary rust killer. Fill with body filler & wet & dry sandpaper (use a block for this rather than your hand as you will get far better results, prime & paint (using aerosols - I wouldn't bother with the paint code - just drop by an automotive shop & you should get a match). Once you've painted & you have allowed it to dry for a couple of weeks you can finish with a product called farecla, this is applied like polish & will smooth off the paint & overspray to give you a nice shiny finish. If you do this correctly it should last for the remaining life of the vehicle.


    Hope this helps.

    stardust, no it's not my business, I was just wondering if anyone had lived in one & if so, given the 'romanticism' (if that's the correct word) of such a vehicle as perceived by some, did they find the reaction they got to nomadic living by passersby was a little less harsh than sometimes encountered?

    Can't sing or dance? That never stopped some artists or singers ;)!!!!


    I remember seeing a gentleman at the seaside not all that long ago. He had a couple of those string operated puppets which he could operate in unison because he had fixed the strings to a batten of wood. He had made a little stage/backdrop for them to 'perform' on. Now this chap had NO puppeteering skills whatsoever. All he was doing was moving the baton up & down so it gave the appearance that the puppets were dancing to a CD he had on. The kids were transfixed & quite a crowd of families had gathered to watch the show. I spent about ten minutes watching to see how many donations were going into the hat & I reckon during that time he took about a tenner. A pound a minute, not bad & something a little off the wall to contemplate in order to generate some money if you find yourself close to holiday resorts or visitor attractions.

    Further to this, I was wondering if anyone has any experience of living full time on touring caravan sites? Does anyone if there any near the coast (particularly in Lincolnshire) who have 12 month residency or winter opening? I don't want to be on the move all the time so hence the seasonal pitch thing.


    I am also considering something else as far as pitching up a caravan is concerned but I'll save that for another thread.

    Thanks for the replies. The beauty about this type of work (I'd get myself a pedlars license so I wasn't being hassled from the polices) is the fact that every transaction would be cash in hand, therefore I needn't bother myself doing too much form filling in :whistle:! All I would aim to do is remain self sufficient while staying way below the radar.


    Thanks for the commissions ideas but, frankly I'd rather steer clear of that one. I used to do commissions for several people who collected my work but, since setting myself up with the task of completing six oil paintings over the Xmas holidays period one year, I decided I didn't need all the hassle which goes with it.


    Boxvan, please paint wherever & whenever you can. Ability is subjective, it's what YOU get out of it that counts!

    I have long harboured the following dream, to make my way around the coastline of the UK (the slower the better) setting up my easel on the seafront & painting then (hopefully) selling my works - or prints thereof - to holidaymakers. I have a decent track record when it comes to selling my art so my ability to produce stuff which is of 'merchantable quality' is not an issue, indeed I tried the pile 'em high & sell em cheap approach a few years ago at the roadside near to a tourist venue. I was into 'spray painting art' at the time & if my memory serves me well, during the course of the morning I managed to shift about eight pictures at £5 each - I thought that wasn't bad for a couple of hours


    I was wondering if anyone has tried anything in the same vein &, if so, have you any hints or tips which you would care to pass on.


    As far as the mechanics of the enterprise is concerned the plan is to live in a touring caravan on a seasonal pitch, moving as/when required.

    Just another option for you to consider (I too picked up from this & your other thread that you may be considering the 'stealth' option). What about an old military land rover ambulance? A little tight for space but it would take you far off the beaten track to where you won't be seen or disturbed. There are plenty of cheap used examples to be had.


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    Hope it helps.

    i was thinking of buying a small woodland/forest ( 10 acres ) what do you reckon my chances of staying hidden/ living there?.. i understand that i can't build anything there ... only stay there (officially) 28 days.. etc..etc...it borders an busy A road... but i cant see any neighbours...there must be 1 pretty close cause the farm is up for sale but has been split into different lots... the woodland being 1 of them it is over 100 acre farm in total for sale..... i will have to check public footpaths ... any tips/advice would be much appreciated.... also this 28 day rule thingy... does this mean the owner or anybody? or somebody?...what i'm getting at is if the owner puts his motorhome on the land and stays the night that counts as day 1... now supposing his mate stays the following night ( in his motorhome) does that count as day 2 of the 28 days or day 1 of 28 for the owner and day 1 of 28 for his mate?.. also what if owner moves his motorhome off after day 1 and friend moves his camper on?


    crazytim, if you intend to stay hidden, do you really need to buy a woodland? You could just set up shop in any number of sites &, so long as you stay away well away from paths etc & keep your activity to a level which will not attract unwanted attention, you should have little difficulty in remaining there undetected indefinitely. If you invest in one or two ex army camnets & set them up correctly you won't get spotted from the ground or the air.


    cammed-up (sunny).jpg
    If the person who rigged this net up moved only a few metres back into the woodland he would be very difficult to spot, so imagine the same in the depths of a forest, away from dog walkers etc. Just don't shoe any lights at night!

    also, what about building a bender to live in? much easier to hide/blend into the surroundings. done right and you will be toasy warm in the winter plus have more space.


    Please forgive my ignorance but what is a bender?


    Also I made a post here (my first on the forum but it never appeared - held in the ether of the moderation queue). I hope this one goes 'live'.