Posts by astartosteerby

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UKHippy is a long running online community and of likeminded people exploring all interpretations on what it means to be living an alternative lifestyle -- we welcome discussions on everything related to sustainability, the environment, alternative spirituality, music, festivals, politics and more -- membership of this website is free but supported by the community.

    Yes please do Aman. I "blew in" as the local saying goes from Northampton in 1998, so not at all Irish. Built my own house on wife's family land, doing most of work myself, and now live as self sufficiently as I can. I have to, as I haven't had a proper job in Ireland since the crash in 2007.


    PM me by all means.

    I live in Ireland, while planning regulations have tightened up in the last couple of years it's still possible to buy land with a house for less than 50k euro. So long as a house is present, in any condition, you can move in and start growing. No restrictions on caravans or mobile homes beside the house either, at least in rural areas, there's plenty in County Mayo living in them. Here's an example http://www.daft.ie/sales/inishcuttle-kilmeena-mayo/931246/

    Pallet wood - it splits easily for kindling after which the cube shaped spacers can go on. The place I worked at used to give away broken pallets to anyone who'd have them, doubtless others would also.


    I have two woodburners at home and aren't too fussy about what goes one. Ash is great when available, otherwise anything will do. It's more important to make sure it's dry, I leave mine for at least a year before burning for that reason.

    I'm looking for a base vehicle with the intention of taking some time away from home and working/travelling, and I find this site very useful for information. In return I've been able to help others with their questions. My usual fora are nomadic lifestyle, vehicles for sale and babylon.


    In my view the site is fine as it is. Can't think of any way to improve it.

    Surely one advantage of mobile living is the ability to park up somewhere fairly close to the workplace? After all a five mile radius from work gives about eighty square miles in which to either find a permanent berth somewhere, or to locate a number of safe night parking spots.


    I should say at this point that I've never tried personally to do this, and have yet to even find a vehicle!

    Zoe,


    You don't say what your situation is at the moment. If you have somewhere to live and are working, I'd scrape as much cash together as you can during the week, and go WWOOFing at the weekends. Keep up the veg growing as it's a useful skill as well as connecting you with the land as opposed to Tesco's, and may bring you into contact with others with similar ideas. Diggers and dreamers has been mentioned.


    Best of luck with the rest of your life!

    I make my own bread (using a bread machine), wine from scratch, beer from kits, chutney from surplus tomatoes from my tunnel ..... I'll have a go at making or repairing anything. I work on the principle that if something's broken or worn out, it can't be made any worse by attempting a repair and failing. Most of the time though my repairs are successful.

    "5 statics, 4 caravans, they are taking in £1000 a week". That works out to £111 per unit per week, Sounds a bit pricey to stay on a caravan site.


    Come to Ireland, I know several people who lived in statics on their own land, or someone else's by permission, for years, some still do. In theory it's against planning regulations, but in practice they aren't enforced, or not that I've ever heard of.

    If I was you I'd think twice about digging up a large area for cultivation, you're better off starting small and concentrating your efforts on getting that well manured and weed free and then digging up more next year if needed. I am virtually self sufficient in veg on a patch 20 square meters, that's about 4 by 5 metres. That doesn't include the spud patch which I move around annually to try to beat the pests.


    I've seen a couple of failures by over enthusiastic veg gardeners who dig up a great acreage, then find they haven't the time to keep up with all work it entails. I spend about 4 hours a week on mine, less in winter, which enables me to keep on top of it.

    Easy wine:


    KIT:


    1 gallon demijohn
    hydrometer
    airlock


    (But a clean bucket covered with a cloth may do as well)


    6 bottles and corks


    INGREDIENTS


    4 cartons of Lidl grape concentrate
    750g sugar
    Wine yeast


    METHOD


    Day 1 - Pour half a carton concentrate into a gallon demijohn. Add yeast and shake. Leave in warm place.
    Day 2 - Should have bubbles or froth at surface. Add the rest of the carton and the whole of another.
    Day 4/5 - Should be fermenting well. Add another carton. Make sugar mix by dissolving sugar into about 1 litre drinking or boiled water. Add to DJ.
    Day 10 ish - When fermentation eases off a bit add the last carton of juice to the bottom of the DJ neck.


    Keep an eye on it, and when the airlock bubbles about once every 40 seconds, or hydrometer shows its ready, bottle. Drink as soon as its clear, normally around a week. It ends up cloudy anyway as it's sparkling and the bubbles stir up the sediment when opened.


    The result is a light sparkly red wine that can be drunk and another lot made while your proper country wines are still in DJ's. I make some to fill in gaps in production of the proper stuff.

    As an Irish resident I can confirm that you are unlikely to be troubled by the authorities for at least six months, if your vehicle has Irish registration plates. I worked in UK for six months in 2010/11 and wasn't taken the least notice of.

    I've seen a few shipping containers converted to living quarters, usually for accommodation while self building a house. They can sit either on the ground or on a semi-trailer, although the latter would be better if you intend moving it occasionally. Then all you need is a friendly tractor unit owner to shift your trailer where ever. It shouldn't be too hard to keep the trailer in order between moves, and the container is more robust than a mobile home.

    Another way to dodge the legislation, if it appears, is to run a standard pick up with all of your fettling and ingenuity contained in a demountable camper body. This body is a "load" and under MOT rules must be removed before taking your now bog standard pickup for its annual test.


    There's always ways round the rules!

    You wouldn't consider staying in Ireland I suppose? My place is the sort of thing you are looking for, situated in Co Mayo. Try as I might I can't make a living here and would like to have a bash at the UK again, if I could rent this place out. Built year 2000, solid fuel CH, possible access to turf bog, veg garden, polytunnel, rural yet within a mile of supermarket, national school, PO, and decent pubs.
    PM if interested.

    You wouldn't consider staying in Ireland I suppose? My place is the sort of thing you are looking for, situated in Co Mayo. Try as I might I can't make a living here and would like to have a bash at the UK again, if I could rent this place out. Built year 2000, solid fuel CH, possible access to turf bog, veg garden, polytunnel, rural yet within a mile of supermarket, national school, PO, and decent pubs.
    PM if interested.

    I've been on bike rallies in the snow and frost and never suffered. All good advice so far, all I can add is to bring a 1 litre empty milk, plastic with screw top, container to save a chilly walk(s) in the night! What goes in must come out!

    Hmmm, not sure if they're much of a bargain at £4850. The body condition depends on how long they've been parked up outside. I bought an ex military motorcycle with very low miles, and I've had electrical problems which were expensive to rectify, also anything rubber will have perished. Not just the tyres but all the various grommets and seals that keep things weathertight. Exhaust and battery will probably need replacing.


    I wouldn't pay more than 3k unless they've been properly preserved somewhere.

    Living aboard a sailing boat has been rattling round in my head for years now. I've owned dinghies, a GP14 and a Mirror, and would heartily warn against a wooden boat. Yes they look lovely all varnished, but I spent more time repairing those boats than sailing them. I'd go for GRP, it doesn't rot like wood and it's easy to repair.


    I'd also go for a bilge keel rather than a single deep fin. They have a shallower draught and if you run aground on a falling tide (WHEN I run aground in my case!) they will stay upright.


    Good luck!