Clothing chaos

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  • Rag mats? What decadence.


    My grandfather made those, used to call them peg rugs too. I has a rag mat in my trailer wot i made.


    I cant remember tje last time i bought any remotely fashionable clothing. I live in ex army surplus stuff.If it doesnt last a few years and cant be recycled into something else afterwards its no use to me.

    Di occhi belli ne è pieno il mondo,ma di occhi che ti guardano con sincerità e amore, c'è ne sono pochi. :hippy:

  • Fashionable clothing is mostly tatty shyte, anyway!

    The thin-legged jeans and trousers now in style (skinnies) are crap to wear; too cold in winter, too sweaty on your legs in summer, and wet and cold and clingy if you get caught in the rain or snow. With no air space around your legs, you have little or no insulation from the weather.

    And don't get me started on fashionable jeans with holes in! WTF good are they? I saw a gal with more leg than jeans on show today, bleddy gret holes all the way down her legs, and up to her ass.

    Interesting, mind.....:whistle:

  • Tut tut..Youll blow a fuse Mr Keith


    I still havent any logical answer for why the fashion for youngsters is to wear ones trousers half way down the legs showing off ones underwear and thus forced to walk like one has seriously shit onself.:/


    Not exactly a new fashion anyway is it...builders have been doing it for decades.:D

    Di occhi belli ne è pieno il mondo,ma di occhi che ti guardano con sincerità e amore, c'è ne sono pochi. :hippy:

    The post was edited 1 time, last by NomadicRT ().

  • Tut tut..Youll blow a fuse Mr Keith


    I still havent any logical answer for why the fashion for youngsters is to wear ones trousers half way down the legs showing off ones underwear and thus forced to walk like one has seriously shit onself.:/


    Not exactly a new fashion anyway is it...builders have been doing it for decades.:D

    Awwww come on you old miserables didn't we look like twats in our youth so many moons ago??

  • As a very, very, little me I remember a large rag mat beside my bed - it was lovely to stand on its warmth before we had wall to wall carpeting. I think my parents had bedside rugs too and, if I remember correctly, there was a half circle hearth rug too.'''''


    We should have a ''HOW TO MAKE'' thread to keep these old, one time, essentials alive! :shrug:

  • I can remember my gran having a rag mat in front of the fireplace in their living-room, when I was a kid in the 50's. It used to get taken outside and beaten about once a week over the clothes line. When my grandad got to do the beating it was particularly impressive - even awesome.....

    I used to get taken outside & beaten once a week too....😕

  • Ah, yes, I remember the old half-moon or half-circle hearth rugs. Our cat used to take up a commanding position right in the middle bit nearest the fire on cold nights.

    My widowed stepmother got remarried.

    My new stepfather got back from work one night, and set himself down in an easy chair near the fire. He went to stretch his legs, but the cat was in the way. He nudged it with his foot once or twice, but it never even blinked. So he looked around the room to make sure my stepmother wasn't present, then gave it quite a dig with his shoe, once or twice, a bit nasty, like.

    The cat opened it's eyes, looked up at him balefully, then reached out a paw and slowly and powerfully raked its claws down his calf to his foot, drawing blood through his thin socks. He screamed and leapt out of his seat, and us kids cracked up laughing as he picked up the poker and chased the cat around the room twice before I opened the French windows and let it out. Hearing the pandemonium my stepmother rushed in from the kitchen.

    "What's happened?" She cried out.

    " it's alright dear," he said, clutching his bleeding foot "I was just letting the cat out". ^^^^^^

  • As a very, very, little me I remember a large rag mat beside my bed - it was lovely to stand on its warmth before we had wall to wall carpeting. I think my parents had bedside rugs too and, if I remember correctly, there was a half circle hearth rug too.'''''


    We should have a ''HOW TO MAKE'' thread to keep these old, one time, essentials alive! :shrug:

    This is the problem with modern technology based western life.No one is taught,learns or uses or is bothered with old skills.

    My generation we were brought up with and taught skills to make or repair stuff from scratch with basic handtools. The skills have virtually vanished except in mostly older generations of uk.

    Go to developing countries in Asia and Africa Eastern Europe and South America those skills are still common everyday thngs most of the population has.

    My neighbour 74 can still make a leakproof bucket from scratch that looks no difference to a modern machine manufactured one.

    How many people can do stuff like that these days.

    I agree we should have these skills preserved. We never know we may need them again.

    Di occhi belli ne è pieno il mondo,ma di occhi che ti guardano con sincerità e amore, c'è ne sono pochi. :hippy:

  • Very true, NRT.

    We see this in the Shed; all the older folk have different real skills, and the younger ones don't, and need to be taught. The older women tell me the younger ones just don't know how to cook a boiled egg, even. I guess this is why so many pre-cooked meals are sold.

  • When we had cadets start we had to teach them how to do toast or fry eggs. Parents hadnt bothered to teach them.

    No clue how to iron clothes or polish boots or simply organise kit and personal belongings.Its abysmal state of affairs.


    On the plus side its a bit magical seeing youngsters excited when they master how to make fire and build bush shelters.....stuff we did so regularly as kids its second nature.

    Digital technology is great but it has a lot to answer for.

    Di occhi belli ne è pieno il mondo,ma di occhi che ti guardano con sincerità e amore, c'è ne sono pochi. :hippy:

    The post was edited 1 time, last by NomadicRT ().

  • Tut tut..Youll blow a fuse Mr Keith


    I still havent any logical answer for why the fashion for youngsters is to wear ones trousers half way down the legs showing off ones underwear and thus forced to walk like one has seriously shit onself.:/


    Not exactly a new fashion anyway is it...builders have been doing it for decades.:D

    These skills will be needed very soon if things keep heading the way they are at the moment!

    I've just modified a ride on mower to all electric, is that a step in the right direction?

  • Tell you what, end of season sales at Mand S are sometimes amazing. Last year I bought 3 good, thick shirts for £1.90 each! Honestly, I couldn't believe it and the clothes rack was stripped in about 15 minutes! Must be out of fashion I think.

  • I've repaired socks in the past, but only summer nylon ones which don't wear very quickly. A lot of modern socks only make polishing rags once they get holes in; not worth repairing.


    We've lost our local M&S; apparently they've been losing money with lots of folks buying online, so have closed a lot of their stores. Usually good stuff though, and I still look for the label in charity shops.


    I think I've discussed my underwear repairs on here before.... when the elastic gets too slack I take up about two inches (50mm) of the elastic waist and sew it close against the remainder. This takes them in nicely, and so long as they don't get crotch-rot, they're good for another year or so.:thumbup:

  • Nope, never repair undies.I only wear cotton ones. When theyre expiring cut off the elastic for bungee type use. Great for keeping rolled up rugs tight.

    The rest goes in the burner.

    Socks i only wear wool sometimes i repair mostly they go in the burner too.

    Most of my clothes are cotton or natural fibre, they reconstituted into wiping rags,trousers legs make great bags for storing stuff....once beyond further use well...burner.

    Di occhi belli ne è pieno il mondo,ma di occhi che ti guardano con sincerità e amore, c'è ne sono pochi. :hippy:

  • Wool is warmer next the skin than cotton, and doesn't make you cold if it gets wet, like cotton does. But some folk can't stand it: too itchy. Thin smooth wool garments don't bother me, but I draw the line at coarse wool next the skin.


    I tend to wear thin wool sweaters next the skin in really cold weather, makes for more warmth with less bulk. Wool doesn't smell like cotton or nylon after being worn for a few days. If it does eventually begin to whiff after several weeks, you can turn it inside out and hang it on a bush in the pale winter sunlight for a few hours, and it smells fresh again.....:whistle:


    I have cut the lower legs off old jeans, and using only the backs, sewn them on to patch other old jeans; sewing a big patch at the seams is more long-lasting than little patches over holes.


    Now I'm finding the sewing a bit of a drag, I often don't bother, as I can often pick up a hardly-used pair of decent jeans in charity shops for four or five quid. This time of year I tend to put the jeans away in favour of cords for colder weather.

  • I cant stand wool on my hands it drives me insane..


    Smell is good for deterring visitors. :D


    I really cant remember the last time i wore Jeans or Cords, maybe the 90's :/

    Di occhi belli ne è pieno il mondo,ma di occhi che ti guardano con sincerità e amore, c'è ne sono pochi. :hippy:

  • The irony is as lads we used to buy jeans as teenagers, then when they were looking a little ropey we used to wear them for work, ( manual ) almost like oh well theyl do for work next week, same went for old jumpers and the like, to us it seemed extragavent and wasteful the irony is it was more greener than what kids do nowadays. Nowadays I buy more work clothes than best clothes, and they wear out faster,work socks start life thinner now im sure than 5 years ago and wear out. but yeah guess it was extravagant, but back then no knee pad trousers just heavy toe capped boots and goggles were the only required ppe. once went to work in a pair of no fear balloon trousers much to the bemusement of a much older work mate.

  • I still do that with charity-shop jeans. Use them everyday in summer if out and about, then when they get a bit stained or worn they get used for jobs around the place or down the Shed (woodwork, etc), until they get holes in. When I can't put them on without putting my feet through I generally chuck 'em out or use for rag or compost. Rarely sew patches on now.

    I will buy used work trousers in good nick in charity shops, but for obvious reasons you don't see them often. They wear better than cheap cords, and are a bit warmer than jeans in winter.