Repairing Kit - Repair or Throw?

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  • It looks we've had nowt new on here for awhile, so I'll take a punt with a thread about repairs. Mostly concerning repairs to everyday stuff that you wear in some way or another, or stuff around the home, garden, etc. Let us know about what stuff you've repaired, how you felt about it, and even how much dosh you saved.


    Now I know a lot of modern stuff just isn't worth repairing if you can get a new one for next to nothing, but probably out of habit, I still have a bash at repairing most anything. Keeps me out of mischief, I guess.


    Only tonight I was given the job of repairing the backstraps on the O/H's favourite little backpack, straps which had half pulled out of their stitching. The straps had been sewn into the seam at the top of the pack. with no reinforcement whatsoever, so a bad design, and probably done for cheapness in manufacture, saving a couple of operations at the sweatshop or factory. It is only a cheap pack, we could get another for a tenner, no doubt. But it's her favourite pack, so yeah, got to be mended....:flowerpower:


    So I looked out my leather kit of scrap pieces, rivets, hole punches, sewing stuff, then made a couple of cardboard templates, and hopefully tomorrow I'll do a little bench-work and get it repaired. While I'm at it I'll maybe take a look at the second strap, which is just starting to go, and repair that one as well. Finding blue leather patches much the same colour as the pack was a bonus; not that she's that much bothered about a fancy job. If it works good, that's always been enough for her, thankfully. And for me, of course...;)

  • Got some Lowas about 15yrs old, heels been cracked for about 5yrs but soles just parted company at the toe. Saving up having had some big bills of late for a resole, about £50. They're now about £300 to buy new. Repaired they should see me out.


    Good quality kit is usually well worth repairing.

  • I'll try to repair anything and everything before resorting to buying a new one.


    It's a bad thing in some cases when i look back and think i invested a couple or three hours into something that i could have replaced with a new one for a fiver.

  • Well, I got the O/H's backpack straps repaired. Picked them both out of the top seam, taped the seam on the inside where it was flaking plastic, then resewed it along without attaching the straps.

    Then made up leather patches inside and out, glued them on first, then riveted them. Then did the same with the ends of the straps. Where they meet now a carabiner just goes between the loops and holds them together.

    So now the straps can be removed if necessary and US Army Alice straps substituted if required:thumbup:. Highly Unlikely!:D

  • Luckily I only generally get to repair the O/H's packs, and sometimes she just chucks them if they are too far gone, and buys another at a charity shop if it takes her fancy. (If they look a nice colour, and are clean enough:)).


    I try to buy myself cheapish but strong stuff in the first place, like ex-Mil kit. I have an old US Alice pack (medium), a Norwegian Army WW2 (40-50L), and a couple of old Swedish Army bags, 35 & 70L. I've had these for years, - some of them used every week or two - and never had to repair any of them, although I have done one or two small convenience mods.


    Modern packs - I have a couple of cheap frameless/internal frame jobs, bought s/h. and they are pretty much rubbish by comparison, and sweaty on the back to carry in hot weather. I've had to do a few repairs on these, and generally only use them nowadays as carry bags in the car when we go on holiday or camping.

  • Electrical contact cleaner can be very useful for getting switches to work and for electrical motors to work,

    And for spraying inside Amplifiers which are giving a lot of static noise on the speakers!

    One Amp we had would gradually built up static over about three years, and one thorough spray inside with Servisol used to put it back to first class output to the speakers.

  • Almost lost count of the number of dead angle grinders and similar devices that have come my way with the same problem. In order to preserve the commutator at the end of the brushes life, each brush contains a spring loaded plastic slug, which when triggered jacks the brush off the commutator breaking the contact, and rendering the device inoperative. A new set of brushes and judicious application of grease in the bearings gives it a whole new life.

  • Repaired the waistband on an old pair of underpants yesterday. The elastic had gone pretty slack so they were uncomfortable to wear, especially when things slipped out of them. All I did was fold over the elastic waistband a couple of inches, then stitch it flat into place. This brought back some degree of elasticity; they feel okay now, but I'll let you know how it goes....:D

  • My newest toy is good for mending things , its a hot glue gun , cost about 15 quid inc 100 sticks of glue plus I bought another 100 various coloured glittery ones for a fiver. Only regret is that I did not think to look for a 12v version, but no big deal as it works fine off the inverter. :)

  • One of my favourite tools, used in so many ways, is a basic digital multimeter, less than a fiver on a well known auction site, and along with an understanding of Georg Ohm's Law allows the diagnosis and repair of so many electrical devices.

  • Yep, that's so true. Several times we've picked up duff electrical items left out in the street for the refuse operators, and all they've needed is a wire soldering back on, or a new switch fitting, or a new pair of brushes, etc.

  • So as I mentioned in another thread, I finished repairing the wheelbarrow today. The one the O/H found in a pile of rubbish the builders had left outside someone's house (She did knock and inquire before taking it:)), with a broken wheel mounting and a broken metal frame. It's a hard life being a builder's barrow, but now it's been repaired it should have an easy retirement with us, mostly used in the garden or allotment. The heaviest job it can get is moving farmyard manure!

  • So as I mentioned in another thread, I finished repairing the wheelbarrow today. The one the O/H found in a pile of rubbish the builders had left outside someone's house (She did knock and inquire before taking it:)), with a broken wheel mounting and a broken metal frame. It's a hard life being a builder's barrow, but now it's been repaired it should have an easy retirement with us, mostly used in the garden or allotment. The heaviest job it can get is moving farmyard manure!

    Sounds like the sunnyvoid retirement home for abused wheelbarrow mate, barrows everywhere salute you!👍😛

  • So today I got out in the yard to measure my neighbour's cat 'house' or 'tower', which is falling to bits because it was never made to be sitting outside her ground-floor flat in all weathers. The top storey is falling down, so I've got to put a new floor on it. The posts that hold up the top floor don't look too good, neither.

    First time I've gotten to repair one of these things, and looks like I'll be doing it from the top down, so the cats can still sit in one level while another level is getting repaired. I've made up a new top floor from scrap ply so far, and just painted it with fence paint. (It needs some protection from the elements, as it will continue to stand outside). This new floor won't be seen much, as it will go under the fluffy covers when the rotting floor is stripped out. It should last two or three years, I guess.


    I do get some jobs.....:)

  • Hmmm....

    I think it's mainly because the O/H kind of tells folk I can do all these jobs....:)


    (Good thing I'm not telling folks in the States that I'm repairing a cat-house; it means something rather different over there ....:D).