Slow food on a solid fuel stove/ one pot meals/ perpetual stew

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  • I have to go fetch every drop of water I use and every drop is precious, I have a roller but and two stainless steel water jacks, I dont wash up after every meal but washing up can be done minimally to preserve water.

  • If everyone had to fetch their own water they wouldnt consume a fraction of what most households do.

    Yes indeed, thye would realise how precious a resource it is. Even though people pay for it, thye still waste way more than they actually need. Main stream society has had its life made convenient and easy, turn a tap and out it comes or flick a switch and on it comes, and all thye do is pay for it to ge tit, but, its been designed like to free people up from working at living life to get the basics to survive to going to work to earn money to buy the daily things people need. At one time way before the industrial revolution, what is now termed as self sufficiency was the everyday work that folk done for them to survive, but the workplace took over as the industrial revolution needed people to man the machines and factories etc so they left the life thyeyhad in favour of what the new ways offered them, to them, it was improvement on what they had but it left behind what was a much simpler more natural way of life, and its turned into what we have today as standard issue lives.

  • We try to keep things simple, so far as we can.

    No point in having the water heater on all night to provide hot water in the (tiny) bathroom first thing in the morning when what was left in the kettle to make the tea will do.

    No heating in the bathroom, so in cold weather a complete wash down once a week from the kettle instead of a bath is the usual thing. Other days it's just pits, hands, face, and sometimes feet.


    No central heating, so a healthy chilly bedroom this time of year is okay so long as the bed is warm. If hair-washing in the bathroom in winter the blower fan gets stuck inside to warm it up ten minutes beforehand. As said above, the living-room gets warmed by kitchen when the oven is on, otherwise heating off all day if the sun is coming in; the other day it got up to 18 C from 14C with the sun streaming in through the (double-glazed) window.


    Electric background heater on if it's cold enough, and sometimes we light a wood fire in the evenings, supplemented with a variety of coal or coal-derived fuels, depending what's locally available. 16C is generally warm enough inside if we are doing something, and if we feel chilly sitting about we can always put another sweater on.

  • having come into my possession a diary from my great grandmother which includes the food that they ate, a staple was root vegetable broth with a piece of rough bread ( corn broke down with a pestle and mortar to make flour) salted pilchards, seagull eggs, shellfish and the occasional rabbit and berries from the hedgerow in season or dried for winter use.he was a tin miner and she was a tin washer, both worked twelve hour shifts six days a week and walked to work average of ten miles each way depending on where the work was. they had 11 kids and the kids started work at six or seven years old only six kids reached adulthood. so you think we have it hard ?

  • Hmmm.....not every zero hour worker is going to afford to progress beyond renting a small, cold room with thin walls and inconsiderate neighbours...


    I kind of understand that we should count our blessings but the outlook remains pretty bleak and still requires a ridiculous amount of effort in order to meet contemporary social, cultural and psychological needs.

  • I think those who run the scene are trying to get us back to those days that WG is talking about. I know plenty folks where both partners work 12-hour shifts, just to try and pay the mortgage or pay some abortive private rent.


    They don't have to walk to work but a vehicle is often a necessity because work is often further away than it used to be. And the kids aren't down the mines yet, but for what some of them seem to learn in school they might as well be.

    I think we had the best time, born into the fifties and sixties when a kind of paternalistic socialism still held sway, and things would get even better as time went by, wouldn't they....? Born at the right time?

  • The clearances are already in full swing but this time its not for sheep its to clear out the prime city areas and rural villages of hoi polloi so the nouveau riche petit bourgeoisie can have it all to themselves.


    Im pretty sure youre right about pushing everyone back in time,paying them all peanuts and forcing folks to work all their spare time just to survive so no one has time to think about rebelling.


    Definitely we wont see a return to a more compassionate society any time soon, we havent hit the bottom yet.

  • Cheesus, I just remembered we're still in the slow-pot thread, and we're lookin' like gettin' a little political again....:reddevil:


    Had the last of the three-day vegetable stew tonight, along with a pack of mushroom pasta on the side, and a nice German bratwurst... Eh, will we still get those if we Brexit....?


    Oh no, gettin' into politics again....:D

  • I think....my generation ...(70s/80s dob) is going to be doubly penalised:-


    First penalised by an elder generation that hold a majority interest and have exploited it to the full....and secondly penalised by a younger generation who have clearer objectives (having seen the the greed of the baby boomers take a negative toll on some of their parents) defined by a clear gap in privelidge.


    My generation is likely to experience the second wave of rebellion that should be directed at the babyboomer generation


    The outlook is bleak


    Yup....slow food....I'm at three and a half weeks of, kinda perpetual stew now..... sometimes it's only a few spoonfuls left in the pot but it's working out ok .....I've had at least one meal a day out of the stew pot.


    It does save on washing up and food costs and is highly vitamin rich (lots of veg).....so far I've not experienced any vomit or diarohea.

  • Stew is a good peasant diet anyhow so we're already into politics 😀


    Which reminds me i forgot to post this recipe for Irish boxty Here

    I was told by a French person of a younger generation that the French now call 'peasants' "people of the land".



    The shift of words and meaning was interesting to me and I tried looking it up online but was defeated by my lack of French language understanding...


    Maybe someone else can find or knows the appropriate phrase in French.

  • Thing is,many of the babyboomers were very much against and fighting the establishment responsible for the mess babyboomers get labelled with.Hippies Punks NATs and all the eco warrior movements came from babyboomer era.


    Im not trying to shift blame just that its not a simple case of babyboomers did this and generation x y or whatever have to sort it out.

    Theres good and bad in all age groups.Much of which is wrong is currently in the hands of a conservative backwatd looking generation older than babyboomers...

    Many of the protests of the 80's contained people of that age group alongside youngsters.

    Everyone needs a scapegoat when we really need common ground and a unified resistance.




    Anyhow glad the perpetual stew is working out,you shouldnt get ill if the pot is always hot and careful with meat.

  • It does mean that in French and English but in France not used in the same derogatory sense traditionally applied by English ruling class.

    The French revolution put everyone on a more even base and reflected in its language, unlike that which unfortunately exists here.

    Until the rise of the current elite the French peasant farmers were still held in high regard.

    Not so much now as the French establishment is becoming like ours.

  • This is an Italian beef stew i do occasionally, it involves wine of course.Its quite quick and eat with crusty bread or fresh Ciabatta.


    https://www.themediterraneandi…ck-pot-italian-beef-stew/



    I make this Russian Solyanka also.Its delicious sweet n sour n spicey flavors.


    You can make it with beef chicken lamb fish whichever you want,its traditionally referred to as soup but is much chunkier like stew.

    You need beef,pancetta or bacon and smoked sausage,also salted cucumber, mushrooms.

    This recipe is pretty much what i make.But search Solyanka you find all kinds of variations.


    https://russianfood-ie.com/solyanka-soup-recipe/


    Quick and simple жаркое (zharkoye)


    Requires quick frying of potatoe cubes onions first but rest is done in crock.


    https://tatyanaseverydayfood.c…ems/stewed-beef-potatoes/


    Also dont forget Cajun cooking has some awesome stews and combinations that originated in North West Africa.


    https://www.southernliving.com…orleans?slide=61253#61253

  • When I was in my twenties, which is more than a few years ago, I once lived in a rooming-house in Northampton, run by an Irish landlord and his wife. I was working shifts at the time, and was awoken one day by the landlord banging on my garret-room door and shouting loudly. The gist of it was 'Are you alright in there? Has the smoke not got you?'

    I put on some trousers and opened the door. 'Thank god!' He said, 'The place beneath ye is on fire!'

    The room beneath mine was occupied by three or four or sometimes five Irish labourer chaps who worked on a road-gang, and left early. They were in the habit of leaving a stew-pot simmering all day.

    We ran downstairs to this bedsit beneath mine. There was a very strong smell of burning. He opened the door with his master key, and the room was full of smoke. 'Jasus,' He shouted, 'I'll call the fire brigade!'

    I went inside and turned the gas off at the stove. A huge pot of stew was burning with a great deal of smoke and no flames that I could see.

    'The bastards!' The landlord cried. He wrapped a towel around the handle of the pot, took it into the hallway, opened the emergency exit, and threw it two stories down beside the fire escape. Being cast it shattered, spilling the burning contents across the yard.

    Typically, the landlord's mood changed abruptly:

    'The pot is broken,' The landlord said as we looked over the fire escape. 'Those poor bastards will have no grub after a cold day on the roads. I'll get the wife to make them a feed!'

  • We had Indian Cottage Pie tonight, with baked taters, stewed veg, and a bit of salad.

    ICP is leftover curry in a dish in the oven, with leftover mashed spuds on top, and any additional seasoning required. Put it in about half hour before the spuds are done, so it browns up nicely.

    There's a similar one where chicken leftovers are used with any leftover stew, and peppered mashed spuds on top. This is known as Smallholder's Pie.

  • We had Indian Cottage Pie tonight, with baked taters, stewed veg, and a bit of salad.

    ICP is leftover curry in a dish in the oven, with leftover mashed spuds on top, and any additional seasoning required. Put it in about half hour before the spuds are done, so it browns up nicely.

    There's a similar one where chicken leftovers are used with any leftover stew, and peppered mashed spuds on top. This is known as Smallholder's Pie

    As soon as I read your post Oldkeith, for some weird reason the words I wonder what you would put in a pie if you called it a multi-cultural pie came into my head.

  • I quit the (sort of) perpetual stew a couple'a days ago so back to salad and other (up flavoured) raw veg for me for now....


    Keeping the pot hot on my solid fuel stove was causing me to overheat myself and after cycling the stew back to chilli/ curry I just couldn't face the (highly nutritious) brown mush.


    I did a good four weeks without emptying the pot entirely but (with hindsight) should probably have kept it more vegetable based throughout.

  • I quit the (sort of) perpetual stew a couple'a days ago so back to salad and other (up flavoured) raw veg for me for now....


    Keeping the pot hot on my solid fuel stove was causing me to overheat myself and after cycling the stew back to chilli/ curry I just couldn't face the (highly nutritious) brown mush.


    I did a good four weeks without emptying the pot entirely but (with hindsight) should probably have kept it more vegetable based throughout.

    Salad in this weather????

  • There's nowt wrong with salad based nosh in this weather, but 4 weeks of not emptying a one pot, thaty must have been getting a bit vinegary and fermented, that would have turned my guts out after 2 weeks and partly it would have seen me sick at the sight of it rather than being physically sick.