Slow food on a solid fuel stove/ one pot meals/ perpetual stew

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  • Perpetual stew on a solid fuel stove:-


    (It's occurred to me that my burner will be slumbering away most days for the next few months so perpetual stew seems like a low heat, cost effective and labour saving way of feeding myself)


    I think this has come up previously as I have a vague recollection of AW mentioning the perpetual/hunters/poachers stew that his dad kept on the go when AW was a kid.


    Anyone else into perpetual (or semi perpetual) stew? I've had a never emptied pot on and off the stove for a few days now and it seems a very sensible approach to nutrition when using a stove with room for only a single pot.....stove top is big enough for a standard supermarket pizza though🤗

  • Post by NomadicRT ().

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  • Yep, a never ending pot is a good economic way, I do end it as 5 days of the same thing can get a bit boring but I am also happy to eat the same thing days on end, for one person it can go a bit off after a while and have a fermented thing going on which is when I end it and do a fresh one. I have a lamb mince, with peas, tomatoes, sweetcorn mushrooms etc on the go, last nigths was the third meal off it and now this morning I am feeling my guts bubbling like a witches cauldron on hot flames lol, dont trust a fart when its like this :shitfan: I will be keeping the pan in the fridge and missing a day me thinks. What I usually do is cook a big pan up for a few days, then when its cold its kept in the fridge then I decant what I need for one meal into a smaller saucepan then that goes on the burner.

  • Max for me is for three days as my palette gets bored, topping up with toms and mushrooms or broadbeans and the kids get the gravy / leftovers. Got a mince curry concoction going at present. (large pack of mince was reduced and I can't freeze it)

  • Made a gert big pot of veg stew with 1 pack of diced beef (reduced) & 1 tin of bully beef 2 days back. That should last another day or 2 now, probably grab some frozen yorkshire puds to fill with it for tea today, then do a pan of sprouts😋 to go with it tomorrow.

  • all us old 'uns seem to have the same ideas, big pot of veg stew, 1st meal veg stew 2nd to a small pot add mashed tata fish bits pinch of chilli to make a chowder,3rd add a bit of mince, after three days i need a change my mum always had a stock pot on the aga of veg stew/broth ready to add whatever me or brothers came home with fish rabbit or fowl fowl was the norm

  • Have to report pretty much the same as you guys. We like to cook up a big pot of mixed veg to start with, particularly in Winter. The first night some of that goes with whatever meat or fish is about, or maybe an omelette if we only have eggs.

    Then next day after that we can get either creative or lazy. Creative is if there is time, put a portion of the veg aside and make a lentil dahl or a separate curried meat dish, and add that to the veg. Lazy is open a can of curried chicken (Sainsbury's is good) or chick-pea dahl and throw that in, instead.

    Usually there is some left-over curry sauce from the second day, so that is either turned into soup with chopped-up leftover veg, or blended in with a new curry dish, three-day-old veg and all.

    In between meals the cooked veg are either kept in our small fridge in warm weather, or in the chilly 'pantry', which has concrete shelves and an almost-outside temperature.

    Haven't tried keeping the whole pot of cooked veg on the stove since the last time I did that, and lifting the lid one night found a growth of beard in there as big as mine, and much the same colour....:eek:

  • Ha thats great, if you lot landed at mine for a feed I wouldnt need to get inventive as we're all on the similar menu's, but it is wholesome, hearty and healthy fare. I am due for a proper old skool stew and dumplings but need to find what seems to be harder to get these days, mutton. We have a cracking local traditional butcher in the village but as he sais what there is not much call for he cant really keep in. I'm not huge meat eater but a nice bit of mutton done slowly for about 12 hours is the nutz.

    One of my favourite go to inbetween meals from the 3-5 day long pot I always do a a couple of poached eggs on two slices pf toast with salad, an avocado, Tzatziki, Salsa or houmous or whatever sauce type pots are on the reduced shelf, and its actually nice with a bit of smoked mackerel.

  • OMG my Mum's stew with home made dumplings was THE best - miss you Mum!:*


    Modern day busy 'house' folk still do a version of a never ending stew but after their meal on day one the remaining potful is decanted into separate containers and put in the freezer to have bits added to it later. Two days of the same thing is enough for me!


    BTW Wiz if you go to a supermarket, or butchers, keep a look out for 'hogget' - a sheep over 1 year old - its becoming quite popular atm.

  • OMG my Mum's stew with home made dumplings was THE best - miss you Mum!:*


    Modern day busy 'house' folk still do a version of a never ending stew but after their meal on day one the remaining potful is decanted into separate containers and put in the freezer to have bits added to it later. Two days of the same thing is enough for me!


    BTW Wiz if you go to a supermarket, or butchers, keep a look out for 'hogget' - a sheep over 1 year old - its becoming quite popular atm.

    Ah right, have had hogget and its pretty good indeed, but a proper bit of mutton is the best.

  • Post by NomadicRT ().

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  • Post by NomadicRT ().

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  • Trouble is the consumer doesn't decide what they want,the marketing companies/pr companies tell the consumer what they want & we just accept it. Mutton is by far superior to spring lamb, but not fast enough profit as you say therefore we are told we don't want it.

  • Post by NomadicRT ().

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  • Yep there is such a thing as consumer buying power to create a demand, as you say, if it sudenly hit the t.v screens then it would rocket in demand, but most people are sadly so dumbed down and blindfolded and bull shitted about all this they dont realise they have consumer buying power. I thnik I am probably the only one who has asked for mutton in the local trad butchers here, thats not enough for him to stock it and as he says, he would struggle to get it round here as its all lambs and farmers dont keep them on long enough, not ewnough profit for them, but there would be if there ws a demand.

  • Post by NomadicRT ().

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  • Ha how funny, ther eis a local tesco express in the village which is a few minutes fast bike ride away, longer of you pedal slowly, and just last year when i had no vehicle on the road while i was doing engine change stuff, I was having to love out of there, well, I wouldnt say I kicked off but I caused a right old stir about the lack of good bread over the utter abundance of total crap I wouldnt feed to a dog and several other items you'd expect them to stock as ingredients but no, twice I had the manager out and all I got was official head office schpeil. they have a tiny corner for furit and veg, a tiddly bit with the most basic of ingredients for home cooking which is so piss poor you'd struggle to get the gear to make a macaroni cheese from scratch, but, if you want microwave ready meals, the worst possible selection of high sugar low anything else and all the shit obese creating snacks imaginable than thats the place to shop and I told two different store managers that on two different occasions. The sad part was they could see my point and they even agreed but both said it is beyond them to do anything about it.


    All i can see of it is this store is a reject store where they get given whats been taken off the shelfs and changed at the big Tescos 8 miles away thats near best before dates or old stock thats been replaced by a fresh lot and it comes here to be sold off. so yes, they sell what they think people want and the stupid thing is people who go in there buy it because they keep restocking with the same or similar, its akin to a chicken and egg scenario, but they do a roaring trade as there is always people in there and for a rural village tey are open till 10 evey night, for why I cannot fathom, I suppose after 7 p.m its for folk after booze.


    Given the village has a very high retired/old folk population of whom they are the generation of home cooking, the store does not cater for that aspect, but I have seen plenty of reasonably healthy active olds buying ready mealsin there which surprises me.

  • Post by NomadicRT ().

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  • Post by NomadicRT ().

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  • Dunno really but would and do argue that I would rather not deal with merchants and middlemen nor contribute to their profiteering.


    Supermarkets tend to offer produce at minimal mark up that suits shoppers who receive sub inflation income...


    There is also the absolute joy of households having multiple wage earners who are time poor and in need of convenient solutions...


    It's also much less challenging to find convenient parking at the supermarket than nearby ones local store...


    Supermarkets tend to reduce the profiteering that stands between consumer and producer/manufacturer and that is in-line with my ideals...

  • Recalling back to when I was a kid - 1950's - the small corner grocery shops with their high-ish prices seemed to take up a bigger proportion of my old man's wages than the supermarkets do of my state pension today. Might just be because of hearing the constant moaning about it from my parents, though...?

  • Post by NomadicRT ().

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  • But surely the supermarket principle of mass production and mass sales can be used to advantage by the State?

    Producers could be paid a reasonable rate at a modest profit margin to themselves, instead of being flayed as they are at present, and the State stores then carry the savings to the consumer, because there are no investors to pay dividends to, and no board of directors to give themselves huge salaries. Enough profit would be made to invest for the future, without strangling either the producer or the customer. This applies to farming and horticulture as much as it applies to machine production. We as people should be benefiting from the machine, which enables us to make more of something much more cheaply via economies of scale. Proper socialist management of the means of production ensures everybody gets a reasonable share, and none get much.


    The principle of mass-production in itself is not 'wrong', it is the way that it is used to benefit the few, instead of the many, that is very wrong. When mass-production machinery was first used, it employed the economic slave labour of people - including children - working 12 hours a day to make a very few people rich. Things have not changed a great deal, and we are slipping back towards that way of life, especially under the present government. But there was a short period in between when workers earned livable wages, and investors took a modest profit on their investments. For the rich, that was not enough, of course.

  • Post by NomadicRT ().

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  • Yep thats all I can say, the current system for everything that makes the country roll on day to day in a semblance of order is for it to stay as it is and it is so well designed to work for the few who benefit the most and to keep the hamsters (working people) on the wheel to keep the wheel turning. so yes, we are stuck with what we have unless as you say there is a global catastrophy to force major change. The elite who run the show are not going to voluntarily bring about change for the greater good that many folk on the ground see that is fast becoming necessary and anyone who thinks that voting in elections is going to/can bring change as they say voting can do needs to rethink that one.

  • I would add that convenience stores appear to stand up reasonably well to challenges....I use them when I need/want that service and clearly the evolved generation of 'corner shops' do ok.


    Some people might choose to shop at Waitrose then Sainsburys then Tesco before going to Asda then Lidl then Aldi....bla...bla...etc...


    Many products are clearly exactly the same but sold at different prices. As with those supporting local shops and farm shops (for example) that is down to consumer tolerance and some folk simply being better off and making choices that reflect a wealthy/generous approach to wealth sharing.


    Sainsbury and Amazon have recently expanded minimum wage discussion by raising the bar.


    Yup producers and manufacturers should receive fair prices but so should all workers.


    The discussion explodes at the point where those in true control find it more profitable to lease to aspiring borrowers and risk takers.


    It's not OK to make me pay more for a product because landlords want more profit.


    Challenging the 'milk' thing:-


    I don't understand why any farmer would be running a dairy herd if it is sooo unprofitable???.....that dairy herd is saleable as beef...


    Surely one would switch to rearing geese (for example) at apx £50 per head (retail) if dairy farming was truly so pointless.


    LMFAO

  • Post by NomadicRT ().

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