Countryfile feat Veganism

Welcome to UKHIppy2764@2x.png

UKHippy is a long running online community and of likeminded people exploring all interpretations on what it means to be living an alternative lifestyle -- we welcome discussions on everything related to sustainability, the environment, alternative spirituality, music, festivals, politics and more -- membership of this website is free but supported by the community.

  • Hi all,

    I'm a keen watcher of Countryfile Sunday nights,and on tonights show,they featured the growing interest in becoming a vegan.(8/4/2018)I believe you can watch this on Catchup.

  • I understand why, but it isn't called for.


    This forum isn't for debating the pros and cons - or shaming non-vegans. When this website started I was merely vegetarian, which is why this was a "vegetarian and vegan" forum as set up by Stu when he was the other admin.


    This, in accordance with the original plan, is a support forum for anyone who already is and moving towards that lifestyle -- welcome to anyone interested in cutting out meat, or anyone with something useful to share.


    The debating stuff is welcome, but meant to go elsewhere.

  • Thanks Paul,I found the show pretty interesting viewing.May visit the vegan restaurant in Bath soon too,the food looked delish! I can see Veganism becoming more main stream very soon,its definately gaining in popularity.:)

  • Countryfile vegan feature sees calls for new farming show

    Lauren Harris
    Monday 9 April 2018 16:40

    Dairy cows in a shed© Tim Scrivener

    Farmers have called for a new rural affairs programme to represent “true countryside matters” after the BBC’s Countryfile was criticised for its coverage on veganism and animal welfare activists.


    On Sunday 8 April, the BBC programme looked into how these groups are impacting on Britain’s farming community.

    Over the course of the programme, presenter Tom Heap spoke to an animal welfare activist, a vegan, a dairy farmer and a Nuffield Farming scholar.


    See also: Countryfile ‘scapegoats’ farmers over hedgehog decline


    Countryfile reported 1% of the adult population in Britain is now vegan, some 559,000 people, and those who have taken that decision due to animal welfare concerns often take “direct action”.

    Mr Heap first spoke to Toni Shephard, executive director at Animal Equality, an organisation which campaigns to improve animal welfare standards, but also stages protests and trespasses on farms in order to film and take photos of what they find.

    She said: “The greatest contribution we can give is ending cruelty to farmed animals. The best way to stop suffering for animals is not to eat them.”


    Footage


    During the interview, Ms Shephard said she wanted to alert people to “pigs being fattened indoors on slatted flooring” and “caged hens in windowless environments”. Animal Equality footage was also shown of animals in poor conditions.

    However, this has prompted criticism from some viewers who believe the videos showed animals in countries other than the British Isles, with some pointing out writing in a foreign language, and asking why Countryfile failed to explain where they were filmed.

    Members of the British Farming Forum Facebook group called the programme “anti-farming”, “Townfile” and a “disgraceful misrepresentative programme by townies for townies”.

    Some stated they now only tuned into the programme to watch the weather for the week ahead segment.

    Others called for the development of a new rural programme, with farmers presenting and appearing, to boost the industry’s reputation and report on “true countryside matters and obstacles”.


    Impartial


    But a Countryfile spokeswoman insisted the programme had dealt with an important item “in a balanced and impartial way”.

    “Countryfile has a long history of covering issues that matter to the farming community and the countryside,” she said.

    “The programme appeals to a wide audience, but we don’t compromise on the editorial integrity of our rural stories and farming journalism.”

    The BBC has said the Animal Equality footage shown on the programme was filmed within the UK.

  • Hi all.

    Just watch, then ignore it!

    Why would anyone want to waste a minute eating a nut, when you can eat a chicken? Where's the pleasure in that?

    Anyone who enjoys eating chicken who has not followed-suffered your posts and does not know that you are a vegan would see this as a fair question.

    However from someone who has read what you have to say about how nasty meat eaters are,I find that this post would appear to be trying to drum up arguments rather than healthy debate.


    I have always had a respect for people who practice veganism and admire their strengh in sticking to what they believe in by trying to make a difference,but do find recently that my respect is now withering because of some recent comments,especially those of you constant.


    I do not mean this as an insult,but constructive comment.

    You are doing the vegan cause lots of damage by alienating people by your antagonistic and hectoring tone. There is enough conflict in the world without comments from a hippy site only adding to the confusion.


    There are Many great people who use hippy forums who are also doing great things to help the planets flora and fauna thrive and survive and just because their-our way is not the same as yours,we still deserve respect for our efforts in trying.


    Respect is a two way street and I really want to keep hold of my respect for people with vegan beliefs,though have been having that respect challenged recently.


    Try a less chalenging way of explaining your beliefs and try to be a bit more accepting of other peoples beliefs. Just because you do not believe in something,does not mean that it is wrong.

  • You are doing the vegan cause lots of damage by alienating people by your antagonistic and hectoring tone.

    I see both sides to this. I don't think it's helpful to constantly shame people -- except in the case of people who troll vegan threads with photos of bacon etc. in which case they're kinda asking for it.

    However, the arguments for eliminating animal products stand on their own merits, and as such "a vegan was mean to me" defence is not really an excuse.

  • An interesting read, AW, for someone like me who doesn't have a telly.

    (although to be fair I have seen the programme a few times when calling on relatives).

    Perhaps the programme likes to be seen as daring, now and then?

  • Has anyone read The China Study by T. Colin Campbell? It's a pretty interesting read about the health benefits of veganism. The book is partially based on the China-Cornell-Oxford research which looked at regional diets and mortality rates in China. I think the book also provided the foundation for the documentary Forks over Knives.


    I would like to make the switch from vegetarian to vegan, I've tried quite a few times over the last 10 years but it's never stuck for more than 6 months. Maybe I'll start again today.


    Sorry that the comment is slightly off topic. Thank you for the heads-up about the country file episode, Cobra.

  • I would like to make the switch from vegetarian to vegan, I've tried quite a few times over the last 10 years but it's never stuck for more than 6 months. Maybe I'll start again today.

    Don't focus on things like The China Study - they're all relevant, but veganism isn't a health thing - you can't, for example, get healthy by avoiding leather.

    It's much easier to stay vegan when we focus on the victims, rather than making it about ourselves.

  • Don't focus on things like The China Study - they're all relevant, but veganism isn't a health thing - you can't, for example, get healthy by avoiding leather.

    It's much easier to stay vegan when we focus on the victims, rather than making it about ourselves.

    I think for me, transitioning to veganism is a mix of health, ethics and respect for the planet. I don't believe there is a right or wrong answer to why people choose to adopt a vegan diet.


    I don't buy leather products and I haven't done so for years, and I don't buy wool as I can't stand the feel of it. I became a vegetarian because I don't agree with industrial factory farming practices. I've read enough about the dairy industry to understand that it's vile so that's why I'd like to cut out dairy and I don't eat eggs unless they're from the hens that my parents keep in their garden.


    The fact that a healthy vegan diet can potentially reverse type 2 diabetes or help people to have good health throughout their lifetime is pretty awesome. But that is purely my own opinion.

  • I don't believe there is a right or wrong answer to why people choose to adopt a vegan diet.

    A vegan diet on without the associated ethics is known as "plant based" - veganism can only be about animal rights by definition.

    You can also eliminate animal products and live on chips, beans and Oreos, and you won't get any healthier as a result.

  • A vegan diet on without the associated ethics is known as "plant based" - veganism can only be about animal rights by definition.

    You can also eliminate animal products and live on chips, beans and Oreos, and you won't get any healthier as a result.

    Fair enough.


    I've never held the word 'vegan' to mean anything more than a person who abstains from animal based products. Perhaps the definition has changed like it seems to have done for gender & racism, but that's a discussion for people who wish to argue about semantics...

  • Perhaps the definition has changed

    The founders of the Vegan Society invented the word Vegan in 1944, which really gives them the right to define it's meaning, and this has been their officially documented definition since they achieved charitable status in 1979:

    "A philosophy and way of living which seeks to exclude—as far as is possible and practicable—all forms of exploitation of, and cruelty to, animals for food, clothing or any other purpose; and by extension, promotes the development and use of animal-free alternatives for the benefit of humans, animals and the environment. In dietary terms it denotes the practice of dispensing with all products derived wholly or partly from animals."


    Bearing in mind that "practicable" means doable rather than practical and the words after "by extension" demonstrates the distinction from non-human animals.

    That definition is generally accepted throughout the vegan world, as it closes the loopholes for people who want to get away with deliberately non-vegan practices.