When i was vegan i discovered....

  • For two years i had been suffering from chronic severe pain, severe itchy skin 24/7 with flakes falling off. Sleepless nights and a pretty bad temper too ( I dont do ill or sleep deprived too well )

    I tried vegetarian diet, washing in rain water, drinking bottled water.

    I had allergy tests that revealed I was allergic to my family dog, so rehomed him and still no better so that was a load of shit.

    I saw three consultants who said it was hives, then psoriasis and this and that. None of these guys had a clue.

    I was put on a course of steroids that ballooned my weight for a short time till i worked it off again.


    Then I went vegan last year, which was when i discovered a few things....

    I found out that i was dairy intolerant and also allergic to potatoes, tomatoes, paprika ( all relatives of the nightshade family) Yes I still smoke tobacco (which is also a nightshade plant ) but so far the smoking doesnt seem to cause me any chronic pain or rash.


    So i came off dairy and stopped eating nightshades and Wham im back to normal health. No chronic pain, no rash or severe itch. IM BETTER YIPPEEE.


    I am back to eating meat again as my diet is already limited i couldnt stay vegan.


    But would like to thank the vegan world for inspiring this change because had i not tried illiminating foods from my diet i would still be in pain.<3

  • I had same,terrible joint pains (dismissed by my doctor as all the rowing and cycling I did) and terrible dry skin itches and 'chicken skin' (my high protein diet according to my doctor) until I discovered i was gluten intolerant.Since cutting it out ive had no joint pains apart from occasional injuries and my skin was back to how it should be.Ive never been vegan but i did go totally veggie for quite a while but with no obvious benefits (other than to animals).

    Im allergic to strawberries as well as gluten....well worth getting allergy tests as I did if you suffer from chronic aches, skin trouble,itching,gut aches etc

  • I've met people who've stayed vegan in spite of quite severe food intolerances, including nut allergies, coeliac disease and IBS - even with restrictive diets such as low fodmap.

    Hi Paul,

    Thats great and Good luck to those who remained vegan. I found being and staying vegan very difficult given the number of foods im allergic or intolerant too.

    I would have to educate myself on more recipes before i begin that journey again, because I really struggled to find ingredients and food that I could live and thrive on.


    Yes Nomadic Rt I am dodgy with strawberries too. They turn my face into a ball of fire, a red hot rash. As do blackcurrants.

    Redcurrants close my throat up, Shame because I love berries. I can eat cherries though. Most bizzarre.

  • I think the majority of people who go vegan for health reasons fail because they forget the ethical side and make it about themselves.


    Basically veganism isn't a health thing and it's not a diet, as nobody ever got healthy from avoiding circuses, zoos, wool, leather, riding horses or using animal tested products - it just isn't about our convenience.

  • Post by treestump ().

    This post was deleted by the author themselves: forget it ().
  • Let me just get one thing straight here Paul.

    I understand fully what veganism is about

    Indeed my reasons were two fold -

    1.) wanting to better my health and

    2) also my regard for environment animals and ethics.

    I didnt just have a wee go at being vegan for a while because of current fads trends or crazes and i was certainly not doing it for any vanity reasons either.

    But i do understand your point Paul and im just making my point very clear too.

  • No I hear you, but I get pretty defensive about this as many people fail to understand exactly what it means. To me, animal rights are important enough to defend which is why I dig my heels in at the current trend of plant based eating and calling it vegan.


    As long as someone is rejecting the property status of animals they can live on chips, sweets and hobnobs and be vegan - because, by definition it's about animal rights before anything else.


    People can eat a plant based diet, and buy leather shoes and a wool jumper, and they still won't be vegan because they're not living within the constraints of the definition -- which is basically the emancipation of animals from human use.


    Also, while being vegan will benefit the environment more than anything else, veganism also means not going to zoos, riding horses or using animal tested products, none of which help the environment.


    As such, it is impossible to be vegan for anything other than animal rights - because other reasons still allow for animal exploitation.


    The definition as decided by the Vegan Society is that of animal liberation, with humans and the environment only benefiting "by extension*" and considering they invented the word, they pretty much have the right to define and modify its meaning as they see fit...

    Quote from The Vegan Society definition of veganism

    A philosophy and way of living which seeks to exclude—as far as is possible and practicable—all forms of exploitation of, and cruelty to, animals for food, clothing or any other purpose; and by extension*, promotes the development and use of animal-free alternatives for the benefit of humans, animals and the environment. In dietary terms it denotes the practice of dispensing with all products derived wholly or partly from animals.

    Anyway, peace :flowerpower:

  • So does that mean that if a vegan goes blind they cant have a guide dog? Or they have to stop saying their vegan if they get the guide dog? Is veganism prejudice against blind ppl by default


    From what i know being a guide dog is one of the hardest n most stressful jobs humans ask of any animal. The dog works round the clock for a couple of years before retiring at the age of 3 or 4, thats after a year of training. I only know this as i walk my dog with a blind woman and her dog.

  • So does that mean that if a vegan goes blind they cant have a guide dog? Or they have to stop saying their vegan if they get the guide dog? Is veganism prejudice against blind ppl by default


    From what i know being a guide dog is one of the hardest n most stressful jobs humans ask of any animal. The dog works round the clock for a couple of years before retiring at the age of 3 or 4, thats after a year of training. I only know this as i walk my dog with a blind woman and her dog.

    Having a guide dog (or any service animal) isn't vegan - I mean, I understand it'd be a difficult decision to make for anyone in that position, but it's still taking an animal and forcing it to work for the benefit of a human - on a moral level, why should we deny an animal agency over its life just to be a slave to a human?


    However, when it comes to survival (medicine for example), it's generally considered excusable if there are absolutely no alternatives, but still not justifiable -- a fine line between convenience and living in a world where very little money is invested in alternatives.

  • I suffer with IBS so I have experimented with all sorts of food 'fads'

    What I have read (many times) is that everyone is intolerant to dairy products to some extent, its just a question of how much it affects the individual.


    Coming at it from a purity of food thing, lots of veggies and vegans are just health food freaks and are motivated by entirely different reasons for wanting to limit what they eat.

    They have no interest or involvement in the animal rights aspect of it at all.

    I see it as purely a dietary choice, the rest is up to you.

    Being a member of the Vegan Society is a personal decision.


    Many of the "my body is a temple" brigade, who are common in the IBS world, actually go much further than vegans in avoiding food additives etc. Wheat is a big one to avoid for many.


    Antibiotics are a separate big 'avoid at all costs' issue because they destroy the biome in the gut.


    About a year ago mouthwash hit the news in a big way, the upshot being it has the same effect as antibiotics.

  • Coming at it from a purity of food thing, lots of veggies and vegans are just health food freaks and are motivated by entirely different reasons for wanting to limit what they eat.

    They have no interest or involvement in the animal rights aspect of it at all.

    I see it as purely a dietary choice, the rest is up to you.

    Being vegan isn't just about diet....it's about not wearing or using animal products too. Someone coming at it purely from a health food angle isn't likely to stop doing those things, so they aren't actually vegan. They've just adopted a plant based diet.

  • Yup.


    If an individual or a group invents a word they pretty much have the right to define its meaning too.


    The founders of the Vegan Society invented the word and, while their wording of the definition has changed over time, it has always been about animal rights first.

  • Im not vegan but ive always seen being veggie and being vegan as too entirely different and mostly unconnected choices.

    I also always thought that people who assume a veggie lifestyle for the benefit of animal rights a tad hypocritical as most still wear leather and wool and use toiletries tested on animals....if youre going veggie for animal reasons then go Vegan instead.

    I think for many though Veggie is a too casually used status term mostly meaningless but implies theyre animal conscious when mostly theyre doing it for dietary reasons.

    Im mostly 'veggie' because of the industrialised meat production system (45million turkeys just got slain for Thanksgiving ) but doubt i could make the transition to totally vegan (for one thing i have and always have had pets for company and had shire horses in the past all of which vegans see as animal slavery-which i dont,Ive always sern and treated them as much part of the family as my human family).

    I do my best to look at things as I go along replacing animal by products with synthetic wherever possible and avoiding meat.

    I suppose the best we can do is whatever we can do individually to reduce animal exploitation whether thats as a veggie or vegan.

  • but doubt i could make the transition to totally vegan (for one thing i have and always have had pets for company and had shire horses in the past all of which vegans see as animal slavery-which i dont,Ive always sern and treated them as much part of the family as my human family).

    Loads of vegans ...including me...take in animals that need homes. There's the ideal world and the real world...in the ideal world they wouldn't be kept as pets at all but unfortunately in the real world there are millions of domesticated animals that desperately need help. I would have thought the majority of vegans rescue animals though....for me the ethics of buying a dog or cat from a breeder would be highly questionable from someone who claims to be vegan..

  • same here, Emma. I have a crowded houseful of animals, all rescued from horrible situations. I feel very sad that they can have no real autonomy, I do the best I can but am aware of how I would feel if I were in their situations. However, there is simply no choice. I cannot simply open the door and say, "You're free, off you go".


    Occasionally if I can find a better home, with a better life, than they have here; I will let one go, but that is rare. Having said which, Fly the collie has gone to live with Pyke recently and I am confident that it is the right choice for her.


    Also Jinsy the rook has been taken in by the local family of wild rooks, and is doing well, so that is two success stories this year. Three, if you count little Spot, the emergency spaniel who came to me earlier this year.


    I think we have to remind ourselves of the good that we do, instead of beating ourselves up about the bad in the world that we can do nothing about, and taking in animals to live with us humans is often the right choice.

    If men bore wings and had black feathers, few would be intelligent enough to be crows.

  • ...for me the ethics of buying a dog or cat from a breeder would be highly questionable from someone who claims to be vegan..

    Not just vegans. I would never purchase a dog from a breeder, especially when there are so many dogs that need good homes.

    You can only accomplish your object in life by complete disregard of the opinions of other people.