They don't make stuff like they used to!!!!

  • We live in a council flat, so the landlord has to have all gas appliances tested once every ten months. Over the years the tests have got stricter, probably due to new (EU?) rules and regulations.

    A couple of years ago our old gas cooker, circa 1976, was condemned by some jobsworth, who also cut off the gas supply without notice.

    So we had to buy a new one, with all the modern silly gizmos on it. We wanted an eye-level grill, and only a very few models are made. Even though we chose a new cooker of the same make as our faithful oldie, it was a curiously tinny thing, with panels barely thicker than those on a modern car.


    It is impossible to turn down the gas to a very low simmer, because nowadays there is a risk that a puff of wind might blow the gas out. (This never ever happened on the old one when at low simmer). When a jet is turned on, one has to hold in the switch for several seconds with one hand, whilst pressing the spark switch with the other, before the gas actually lights and stays alight. Another 'safety' measure, presumably, that the old cooker never had, and never needed in all the years we used it. It does manage to cook food reasonably well, by the way, much like the old one.


    So our our new cooker, although looking new, is but a shadow of its predecessor in ergonomics, structural strength, and general operating ability. They certainly don't make them like they used to!

  • Had the same with my old Canon gas cooker...condemned because it didnt have safety gas cut offs and 'ya cant get the parts for them no more'

    It weighed a ton and took two of us to shift it.

    The replacement( electric) was made of tinfoil and virtually blew around the kitchen....soon packed up a year later and a new gas one procurred.

    In-built unreliability and obsolescence ..a dream come true for capitalism.

  • I love old fashioned stuff like that.Its reminded me of when my ex husband and I brought an old place,back in Oz,a few years back.The previous owner was an old guy,who moved to a retirement village.The house had a laundry (outhouse)which was detached from the house.We had a modern washing machine,but when we moved into the house,the old guy had left an old singer washing machine.My husband was going to take it to the dump,but I decided to give it a go and hooked it up.It had a large drum,with a big agitator in the middle.A long lever at the side started the wash cycle.(The only cycle)and it had a wringer placed over the top.Luckily the tap over the sink was a movable arm type one,which I hooked up to the rain water tank to fill the drum.Wow,what a fantastic washing machine that turned out to be.You could fit heaps inside the drum,and because there was no timer,you could wash how long you wanted to.I used to use rainwater to rinse the clothes in the large laundry sink,and then thread them through the wringer.I think the model of the machine was from the early 60's???Incredible.I never went back to using my modern machine.The old one was still working when I left.I never looked at washing that way as a chore.It was more a pleasure,and I was'nt in any hurry.It looked like this one...

    https://www.google.co.uk/searc…DAC#imgrc=LEFwb6ZsLs_VjM:

  • I used to help out my Ma and her bloke with house clearances so seeing that on the news gave me a big nostalgic smile as I remember lugging all of those appliances out to the Luton , usually a dab of jif and some elbow grease before going on sale in the secondhand shop they owned , but there were rules and regs introduced that meant a lot of the stuff could not legally be re-sold.

    The cloth covered flex was first to go , them fridges were outlawed as kids could climb in but not get out (them days fridges were not recycled so we were obliged to smash the lock/handle before disposal).

    The gaps in the guard bars on most electric fires were deemed to be too far apart, there again we were obliged to cut the flex off before disposal.

    Another thing is the materials used , a lot of appliances contained asbestos in one form or another.


    I remember one old house was like a time capsule and in the corner of the front room was what I thought to be a cocktail cabinet with big sliding woodslat doors,turns out it was a really old television set, 4 ft cubed cabinet containing a 20 inch screen, thing was when we hauled it out there were scorch marks on the wallpaper behind.

  • I recognise that first washer Cobra...my gran had one, or very similar.Before switching to a twintub which she had right up to mid 90's (about 30 years) then 4 modern front loader machines in the space of 6 months,3 packed up with programmer faults.Certainly dont make stuff to last anymore.

  • I think it’s a great time to ‘up grade’ for free, more folk replace appliances on a regular basis these days. Replacing appliances because they ‘dont Match’ or aren’t the latest design. I fitted a new kitchen that was pinched from a building site in 1996 a brand new (built in) dishwasher came with it. The ex banned me from using the new kitchen sink and I never mastaered the new fangled dish washer. Two years ago I picked up a used dishwasher from the side of the road and plumbed it into the standpipe. Ran a power cable to it and super cleaned one load of pots. Never used it again. This year again, found another stainless-steel dishwasher at the side of the road, much smaller than the last one. It had a handwritten note stick to it saying, ‘free to good home’ I loaded in into the vehicle. When opening it up. It contained all the cleaning products required, pipes and manual. It’s parked outside my wagon door now. I’m toying with the idea of using it for cleaning pots and engine parts etc.

  • I think untill not so long ago , stuff was made to last and be servicable . A lot of people used to by on HP on longish terms , they would not like it packing up before it was paid for .

    Modern stuff seems to have electronics in them that play up or fail all the time .

    Cars are a good example of build longevity There would be more old cars on the road still if it wasnt for there fuel economy . Everything today seems to be made to the minimum standard they can get away with . Things like washing machines are rigerouslty tested in developement to see how long they will last , and most just scrape through 2 years .

  • The pic I posted was for reference,but that was the jist of the design of my own machine.I really loved it too!^^ My Mum had her old twin tub washing machine until she died 3 yrs ago.My sister tried to persuade her to buy a new front loading one,but Mum refused and said "No way,what would I do all day if I had to just press a button"?:D

  • .

    I think untill not so long ago , stuff was made to last and be servicable . A lot of people used to by on HP on longish terms , they would not like it packing up before it was paid for .


    Nowadays when buying new they really like to sell extra guarantees with the product , sometimes the premiums are as much if not more than the value of a quick fix , problem is that modern consumers EXPECT things to fail within 3 years and therefore the insurance becomes a must have for peace of mind, I used to have this conversation with my wife when buying new, she was very straight and proper , the thought of not having something insured apalled her.

  • my parents have the same dilemma - mum doesnt do washing machines, but has a separate gas boiler for the sheets and a spin dryer. the big problem was when they replaced the cooker after the old one rusted out, they needed to find one with the gas takeoff point to connect the boiler. They eventually found one, but it cost.

  • I have an old Kenwood Chef. I bought it second hand at a carboot. I've picked up attachments and stuff over the years on ebay.

    The rubber seal on the blender attachment wore through, it was easy enough to find another one.

    I've had it for about 25 years now. My husband did buy me a new one in 2011. It is swankier looking but I do prefer the old one.

    Doc Marten's are my favourite moan. Whilst they aren't white goods, I have a pair I bought 2nd hand when I was 17. They are amazingly comfy.

    The new ones that aren't 'Made in England' are a bit rubbish, they aren't even finished off as well.

    They seem to be selling more on the designs than the quality now. The 'quality' ranges cost a freaking fortune, whereas they used to be the regular boots.

  • They dont sell stuff like they used too either . I liked it when hardwear stores sold nails loose by weight and screws by the box or dozen , not in wanky rip of bags of 6 . Yes , there are a few places that still do but few and far....

    I get sick of all the plastic too, thats why a lot of stuff is so fragile . Plastic biumpers ,WTF ! I want girders on the front of what I'm driving . Infact ban plastic . Bring back more wood, glass and metal .:/

  • I picked up about 15 boxes of screws at a boot fair for either 50p or £1 a box, I too deplore how you cant easily buy decent screws in quantity - chipboard screws - no problem, decking screws - no problem, but decent wood screws no chance.

  • wilkinson's sell screws and nails loose, pick and mix whatever you can get in the bags supplied.

    I saw that last time I was i there , but I think they still work out a bit expensive . I sometimes will want a kilo of staples or 6 ich nails . Luckily a screwfix has sprouted 10 miles away .

  • They dont sell stuff like they used too either . I liked it when hardwear stores sold nails loose by weight and screws by the box or dozen , not in wanky rip of bags of 6 . Yes , there are a few places that still do but few and far....

    I get sick of all the plastic too, thats why a lot of stuff is so fragile . Plastic biumpers ,WTF ! I want girders on the front of what I'm driving . Infact ban plastic . Bring back more wood, glass and metal .:/

    I usually go to a monthly farm auction sale or wholesale building merchants and splurge on boxes of screws nails vehicle fuses bulbs hinges drill bits etc .Ive come back with a car boot stuffed with gear for 50quid...I just cant be arsed with all that 6 nails in a pack bollox.

  • My best friend took her Grandma to Preston Park, where ancient rooms were looked at from behind plexiglass.


    One room, a kitchen, Grandma said that she had a kitchen like that when she was a little girl.


    Katrina said, "My friend Margaret lives like that . . ."

    If men bore wings and had black feathers, few would be intelligent enough to be crows.

  • I think it’s a great time to ‘up grade’ for free, more folk replace appliances on a regular basis these days. Replacing appliances because they ‘dont Match’ or aren’t the latest design. I fitted a new kitchen that was pinched from a building site in 1996 a brand new (built in) dishwasher came with it. The ex banned me from using the new kitchen sink and I never mastaered the new fangled dish washer. Two years ago I picked up a used dishwasher from the side of the road and plumbed it into the standpipe. Ran a power cable to it and super cleaned one load of pots. Never used it again. This year again, found another stainless-steel dishwasher at the side of the road, much smaller than the last one. It had a handwritten note stick to it saying, ‘free to good home’ I loaded in into the vehicle. When opening it up. It contained all the cleaning products required, pipes and manual. It’s parked outside my wagon door now. I’m toying with the idea of using it for cleaning pots and engine parts etc.

    dishwashers clean engine cases ect beautifully. Just put it on empty afterwards to clean it before putting dishes in it

  • Clothes!

    My Gran was a seamstress and my husband trained as a weaver straight out of school.


    I've seen 'properly finished' clothes. My Gran would spin in her grave at some of the clothes in shops today.


    Of course they aren't made to last any more. Clothes are made cheap and chuck away when next seasons range comes out.


    Most people are appalled at the price of quality clothes that are made to last - if you can find them, without having to advertise a brand on your sleeve - or another part of your anatomy.


    I try and get vintage clothes but without going to the hyped up vintage shops where the prices are hiked up and the 80's and 90's are considered 'vintage' - I lived then I know what the quality was like.


    My husband is sheer hell, especially about tweeds and cheap kilts.


    Most of my clothes are from charity shops or ebay. I get t-shirts, vest tops and underwear from high street but unless they are from shops that specialise (I have a tiny back so I cant buy bras out of most shops) I don't expect stuff to last.

  • My daughter rarely takes me clothes shopping any more. She pays mega amounts of money for something so poorly made that it looks as though the material making it has been cut and stuck together with glue!


    She has told me off so many times for looking at seams and stuff. It's awful the rubbish on hangers in shops now, waiting to trap the unwary into buying something that they can wear no more than once or twice before it disintegrates.

    If men bore wings and had black feathers, few would be intelligent enough to be crows.

  • I think its a shame that clothes have become that way-like everything else,thrown together- The people who make the clothes are not without skill,it takes a lot of skill to put clothes together super fast with few or no errors but theyre not allowed to take their time or make a good job and the materials they use arent top quality either.Its the whole industry mindset of kidology.Make it as cheaply as possible,make it look and feel like quality and charge as much as possible.If it falls apart 'it will encourage them to go buying new clothes'.

    I know where you husband is coming from on kilts DM.

    A proper kilt made the traditional way costs many hundreds of pounds and made/put together by artists.

    not the 25 quid fake kilt you can buy on ebay.

    One thing I love about the Hebrides is we've still got proper weavers up there who know what theyre doing and how to make quality cloth.Harris tweed is one of my favorites.


    On the whole though,quality is fake nowadays....like most everything in modern life 'all pie and no filling'.

  • You get what you pay for. Bought a German shooting jacket from a country store in about 83 as it looked smart and fitted (getting clothes for my size is hard) and I'm still using it on a regular basis as a best coat now and it still looks smart but just a little worn in places if you look close. It was made well.

    I felt guilty about the price as it was damn dear but it was a good buy. Also boots, On my second pair of Lowas in 25yrs and they need resoling (bike use is hard) again damn expensive but comfy and do the job.

    The Hebridean weavers turn out the best cloth and if I was flush I'm sure I could justify buying one of their jackets and as for kilts, my last was 2nd hand for £60, old and rare with a new price of well over £600. Just got to lose a few inches off the waist to get back into it.

  • Still have my Harris tweed jacket I bought when i was 20 when i lived in London.It still fits fine.

    Ive still got my Italian and German suits that cost a fortune only ever been worn to weddings funerals and a couple of events in London.

    I dont wear them now but im not getting rid of them either as id never get anything like them again Id never afford them.Ill give them my lad when hes older.

  • Still have my Harris tweed jacket I bought when i was 20 when i lived in lived in London.It still fits fine.

    Ive still got my Italian and German suits that cost a fortune only ever been worn to weddings funerals and a couple of events in London.

    I dont wear them.now but im not getting rid of them either as id never get anything like them again Id never afford them.Ill give them my lad when hes older.

    I have a lovely Harris tweed skirt suit. It's vintage. I bought it on ebay.


    Like a lot of vintage clothes it doesn't suffer from vanity sizing and hadn't got too many bids due to this.

    Luckily I'm a skinny bugger.

    I just took the skirt up a bit and made it less 'A' line. Looks great.


    I did have a hacking jacket for the Marches - cost a freaking fortune. It got too big when I got skinny and I hadn't ridden in years - sadly. I donated it to charity.

    Karma for the nice charity stuff I have picked up over the years.