Living full time in touring caravan

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  • Hi. New to the forum and I am interested in the nomadic life. I am 65, lost my wife 7 months ago to cancer. It's me and our dog now and I am lookIng to finding a new direction in my life. I have had an interest in "moving structures" I have a boat in the final stages of building and it's about to be moved to a boatyard, close to a river. Still some work to be done though. My idea at present is to get a touring caravan that I can use to live on, part time as well as part time on the boat, so as to have choice, options and not overstay my welcome by staying in the same place all the time!
    Anyone here lives in touring caravans?

  • A seasonal pitch is a cheap option,less than a third of the normal price, you still have to leave for 48 hours every 21 days though.


    Touring caravans are pretty good nowadays, though they lack insulation; a bit chilly in winter & way too hot in summer.

  • Does the caravan have to leave? Or just the inhabitant of said caravan? Easier if just you! No hardship really. I have a boat also, not quite finished. My plan is to alternate between the two. As it's the same with boat, can't stay there 365 days a year on it I believe something to do with council tax, although not yet clear on that. Besides, the Algarve is appealing in the winter.

  • I know that a friend of mine that had a seasonal pitch on a large busy cc site didn't have to move his van,and once he got to know the caretaker he didn't have to stay away himself.


    I met a guy doing the same in a converted bus. He was in to his second year on the same site. He even got the job of cleaning up the rubbish, sorting out the recycling etc. He got a free pitch with mains electricity, hard standing and beer money for working. On the second year he got grassed up. The Council visited the site and caused problems for the campsite owner. For the following year he had to hide himself and the bus around the back of the farm and keep a low profile. Over familiarity and staying too long in one place.

  • Hi Jackdaw
    Im really sorry for your loss, its really hard being on your own after something like that and you have to expect incredible ups and downs emotionally its only natural. That's why you need to be around people, that may appear opposite to how you feel


    For entirely different reasons I am looking at buying a tourer and "site hopping" most caravan sites are not legally able to let you stay for more than 28 days. So move around. As others have said its about building a relationship with the site.

  • Thank you Bernie. finding a new equilibrium is my goal for the near future. I quite like the idea of moving regularly hence my thinking about a caravan. I have looked at van thinking of converting one myself, I have the skills (worked as a boat builders for years) but at the moment I haven't got the inclination. Apart from having my boat to move shortly and work on before the next batch of wintry weather sets in! I have looked at some caravans recently, they do look really comfortable and roomy.

  • Thank you Bernie. finding a new equilibrium is my goal for the near future. I quite like the idea of moving regularly hence my thinking about a caravan. I have looked at van thinking of converting one myself, I have the skills (worked as a boat builders for years) but at the moment I haven't got the inclination. Apart from having my boat to move shortly and work on before the next batch of wintry weather sets in! I have looked at some caravans recently, they do look really comfortable and roomy.


    Self converted vans are a lot of work and old tourers are dirt cheap so it doesn't seem much of a contest really if you intend to site hop. Also the better sites are becoming difficult about the less sophisticated conversions. Top sites are hard to get onto, you have to book months in advance for the summer and you can rent a whole house in south wales for a lot less than the weekly site fee.

  • Does the caravan have to leave? Or just the inhabitant of said caravan? Easier if just you! No hardship really. I have a boat also, not quite finished. My plan is to alternate between the two. As it's the same with boat, can't stay there 365 days a year on it I believe something to do with council tax, although not yet clear on that. Besides, the Algarve is appealing in the winter.


    I believe its to do with the planning permission on which the site operates. They can only take holiday makers basically on a touring basis. The councils make the rules not the site, and presumably their reasons are fairly obvious

  • Also the better sites are becoming difficult about the less sophisticated conversions. Top sites are hard to get onto, you have to book months in advance for the summer and you can rent a whole house in south wales for a lot less than the weekly site fee.


    The Caravan Club HQ are picky, couldn't get an answer out of them regarding what was acceptable on site but from conversation with wardens on moving round it's down to how you approach them. A tidy unorthodox van is no problem as long as site rules are obeyed, parking to the peg ect and you don't look too much like a sack of shit when you go in. Draw the line before wearing Chums cumfy trousers, the fawn windcheater and Clarkes shoes which is standard uniform for most of the old coffin dodgers and their sterile highly polished white boxes. I may have been a source of amusement unloading the dogs from their garage home under the motor and the mud splattered sides may have shocked them but I've not once had a problem on site or been refused entry, just the opposite as they remember the dogs. Even had the offer of a massage off a warden at Lairg when I said I'd pulled my back, declined as she was a big strong girl and lamb to slaughter came to mind.