Vegan & Oral Moral Issues

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  • I can think of no better place than here to settle this debate which arose in the pub last night


    Q. Can a true Vegan perform Oral sex with his/her partner as Sperm is an ANIMAL by product ??


    Reply here or on the back of a postcard to
    Blue Peter
    PO BOX 69
    Wood Lane
    London W6

  • Sounds a bit like the ancient spliff question


    PC - is that an illegal substance you are smoking?


    Smoker - I do have a lit spliff in my mouth but I'm not inhaling.

    "The European Union is just like a jigsaw puzzle, except the pieces all come from different puzzles". - Red Dragon

    "The surest sign that intelligent life exists elsewhere in the universe is that it has never tried to contact us".
    - Calvin+Hobbes

  • Hah, humans don't count. I'd rather eat a human than an animal.


    However, a better question is, as a vegan can you give oral sex to a meat eater?
    (though seriously, why would you want to?) :reddevil:

  • On reflection, I think that it's fine to swallow and perform oral sex in the first place, even if both are vegans!


    The Vegan Society defines its core tenet as - Veganism is a way of living which seeks to exclude, as far as is possible and practicable, all forms of exploitation of, and cruelty to, animals for food, clothing or any other purpose.


    Therefore, if I understand the concept of veganism correctly, it's all about exploitation of animals rather than all about the consumption of animal products and so, assuming both vegans perform willingly, there is no exploitation and no problem.

    "The European Union is just like a jigsaw puzzle, except the pieces all come from different puzzles". - Red Dragon

    "The surest sign that intelligent life exists elsewhere in the universe is that it has never tried to contact us".
    - Calvin+Hobbes

    The post was edited 1 time, last by Red Dragon ().

  • Not all vegans are concerned with animal rights aspects, some are just foodie based preferences to do with all the additives, hormones etc they give to farm animals


    I'm a veggie but its purely around healthy eating principles for me

  • I once, many years ago, asked a vegan lass this question (I knew her well enough to ask, you know, it was a random question thrown out at a lentil party or anything like that) and she told me that as sperm was willingly given by the man (really, and I was thinking men were reluctant) it was okay. Jokes aside it seems a reasonable explanation if you discount semen being of cellular structure.

  • Not all vegans are concerned with animal rights aspects, some are just foodie based preferences to do with all the additives, hormones etc they give to farm animals


    I'm a veggie but its purely around healthy eating principles for me


    U.K. Farm animals receive no hormones.

  • U.K. Farm animals receive no hormones.


    Not strictly true.


    Some hormones are used as medicines to treat sick cattle or to aid fertility control in cattle, pigs and sheep. They must only be prescribed under the strict control of a veterinarian. These products have been licensed as safe to use in food producing animals by the Veterinary Medicines Directorate, with withdrawal periods imposed to ensure no harmful residues can enter the food chain.

  • There are as many reasons for being vegan as there are vegans. Its all down to personal choices, there is no rule book.

    Incorrect - you can only be vegan for animal rights; that is recognising animals should not be property.


    There are human and environmental benefits from veganism, and you can eat a plant based diet and be healthy - but nobody ever got healthy from avoiding wool, silk, zoos, horse riding, honey or animal testing.


    The word "vegan" was coined in 1944 by the founders of the UK Vegan society, and despite their flaws, they do have the right to define the word. The first official definition was as follows:


    “to seek an end to the use of animals by man for food, commodities, work, hunting, vivisection, and by all other uses involving exploitation of animal life by man”


    In 1979 they updated it:


    "A philosophy and way of living which seeks to exclude—as far as is possible and practicable—all forms of exploitation of, and cruelty to, animals for food, clothing or any other purpose; and by extension, promotes the development and use of animal-free alternatives for the benefit of humans, animals and the environment. In dietary terms it denotes the practice of dispensing with all products derived wholly or partly from animals."


  • Post by Paul ().

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  • Therefore, if I understand the concept of veganism correctly, it's all about exploitation of animals rather than all about the consumption of animal products and so, assuming both vegans perform willingly, there is no exploitation and no problem.

    Unless at some stage they discover sperm sentience and realise that they all suffer horribly in the process. :D

  • How do vegans deal with squashed insects on the windscreen or running over a rabbit for example? Driving is a choice so it is avoidable although seems a bit extreme to give up driving for a few bugs?

    Motorised transport is pretty much unavoidable, which means critters will get killed by buses and trains as much as they will by cars, vans, lorries etc.


    Some people get the idea that veganism is about either eliminating all animal harm or not try - but it's more about adopting a baseline of minimising it as far as is actually doable, thus focusing on the avoidable commodification first and addressing the rest as we go.


    Pretty much everything humans do causes harm and as such we the less we use of everything the better.


    I cleaned my own car yesterday and was happy to report not a single bug -- but that's an advantage of living in the city I guess.

  • I know a crofter in Scotland who has highland cattle. They are born in the field, with the family standing around watching, as a holistic vet oversee's the birth, no injections all natural. Then they all go and live naturally as a family in various fields, up to them, living on fresh grass and all the other lush vegetation you get where a fresh stream meets a lochside, a pure stream runs through their lands. You see them on the beach sometimes, that's funny.
    Several times a year they are taken on the ferry, to one of islands (the name escapes me), and they walk a familiar route, and through a wee shed, have a good feed, then back on the ferry home. When the need arises to kill one of them, for food for the winter, that animal is at the back of the queue and would be dead long before it knew what happened.


    Can you get meat any more humane than that? No fear, no negative energy in the food, as near to "no guilt meat" as you'll ever get :hippy:

  • When the need arises to kill one of them, for food for the winter, that animal is at the back of the queue and would be dead long before it knew what happened.


    Can you get meat any more humane than that? No fear, no negative energy in the food, as near to "no guilt meat" as you'll ever get :hippy:

    Firstly there is no need. It's not obligatory, necessary or mandatory to eat animals.


    Secondly, there is no feasibly humane way of killing something that would rather be alive - and given the choice I assume the cow would have an interest in its own life. :S