Cyber attack on NHS, news

Welcome to UKHIppy2764@2x.png

UKHippy is a long running online community and of likeminded people exploring all interpretations on what it means to be living an alternative lifestyle -- we welcome discussions on everything related to sustainability, the environment, alternative spirituality, music, festivals, politics and more -- membership of this website is free but supported by the community.

  • I'm just fascinated to find out if the NHS will have to pay the ransom.


    I don't agree with computerising all aspects of healthcare. I see it as a waste of time and resources the closer it comes to the patient.


    Maybe NHS fatcats and profiteers will take a little step back and realise that IT is sometimes more time consuming and money sucking than it's worth patientside.


    What will probably happen is that the NHS will pay IT consultants far more than the sum worth of paying the ransom.


    Course the NHS will be hard pushed to find IT contractors willing to work under recently introduced discriminatory public sector tax rules that discriminate against independent contractors so will be forced to pay way over the private sector rate in compensation.


    Funny how things just do not ever work out.


  • The technology actually does make things more efficient, if the NHS went back to pen and paper it would not be able too function and you would just end up waiting even longer for appointments and things to get done. The reason the virus has spread so badly is because a lot of trusts have either not up dated their software with the latest security patches and also some trusts are using old systems that are not supported anymore. The NHS IT departments and their employees are the ones working on fixing the problems, they will have some work ahead of them. Hopefully the Government will learn from this and give the NHS the money it needs to update their systems and invest in better security. It is also important to remember that this virus is an e-mail virus which spreads when people open suspicious e-mails and click on the links within them, it is most likely that staff opened e-mails that looked genuine, clicked on the links and caused it to spread. :)

  • The amount of money that has gone in to the NHS IT system is staggering & yet they still have such out of date systems. I don't see how they can get past this issue.


    Hopefully the Government will learn from this and give the NHS the money it needs to update their systems and invest in better security.


    Haha, that won't happen. They've been systematically destroying the NHS for years, even labour that claim to support it have done little towards the long term. This may lead to the further break up of the various groups that make up the NHS.


    You're right about the email, the scary thing is that even on an older system you have to click past several warnings to open that dodgy mail attachment. That kind of dumb takes some effort and makes me wonder if it was intentional.

  • One of the main things to do is update windows and back up anything that you really don't want to loose.


    If you get this worm/ransomware then immediately disconnect it from any network and bin the computer.


    You will not remove the infection and whilst it is connected it will try to infect further computers.


    Probably not worth paying the ransom as they wont bother to release your computer


    paul

  • If you have it backed up (regularly - if not, why not) then disconnect from network (wireless or wired) wipe disk and reinstall your os of choice. Restore backup, couple or three hours work.


    Some people (idiots) disable the macro warning on office as they regularly use files legitimately containing macros, and its a pain to click the mouse a couple of extra times every time they open a particular spreadsheet apparently. This and people taking photos etc in to work to print, or a funny video they got emailed etc on an infected usb flash drive are the most common ways of infection spreading - the usb doesnt even require an external internet connection, people do the infecting thenselves.

  • the main NHS hospitals that were hit seem to be in London, Kent, Surrey, the Midlands and Scotland, surprisingly not one hospital in the far South west was affected.

  • I started a thread about the documentary ZERO DAYS, which shows how easy it is to corrupt systems world wide. I saw another the other night about hackers. There are what they call "white hats" and "black hats". The black hats destroy stuff for profit, the white hats are hackers that show companies like banks and hospitals how to protect their systems from being attacked. The black hats out number the white hats a thousand to one.

  • they reckon there will be another attack on Monday when everyone switches their computers on for the start of the new working week.

  • they reckon there will be another attack on Monday when everyone switches their computers on for the start of the new working week.


    Most NHS computers are switched on 7 days a week, so the damage is pretty much done, it should not get any worse for the NHS. All the other companies who shut their computers off for the weekend, they will have more chance of issues.

  • Most NHS computers are switched on 7 days a week, so the damage is pretty much done, it should not get any worse for the NHS. All the other companies who shut their computers off for the weekend, they will have more chance of issues.


    whatever, as long as it dosent affect mine I don't much care.

  • It will not affect yours unless you open a link on a dodgy E-mail or are using an old operating system that is no longer supported. Anyway, as you are a prepper, you most likely have a type writer in case such emergencies occur :pp


    yeah, they did say that some hospitals were using Windows XP still.

  • Which stopped being supported in 2014 for normal users, but the gov had some sort of special deal with Microsoft to provide ongoing support, but they pulled out of it two years ago apparently.


    probably about the time windows 10 came out.

  • I think the gov pulled out because they just did not want to spend the money, it was a 5.5million annual deal. Had they have not pulled out the NHS would have still had support for the old XP systems.


    If that's true it's really sad; and sad that hospitals use any Windoze system, let alone XP, when they have technically far superior systems like Linux or Unix which they can use without paying for hundreds of thousands of licences. It is all too obvious that engineers are not in charge. Just another area of the NHS that needs close assessment and rebuilding.

  • If that's true it's really sad; and sad that hospitals use any Windoze system, let alone XP, when they have technically far superior systems like Linux or Unix which they can use without paying for hundreds of thousands of licences. It is all too obvious that engineers are not in charge. Just another area of the NHS that needs close assessment and rebuilding.


    It is true, the gov signed up for a deal and then ended it. :)


    http://www.hertfordshiremercur…0330354-detail/story.html


    http://uk.businessinsider.com/…nhs-cyber-security-2017-5

  • Engineers are never in charge because they just want to build things.


    The people that make decisions will argue for proprietary software for many reasons, few of them valid. Redhat brought out a fully supported version to counter some of those arguments and the idiots still found reasons to complain, if nothing else they resort to "it's still open source". Yes it is, and that's a good thing, it means the code is reviewed by thousands of people around the world to make it more secure rather than a small team under pressure because the release schedule is behind.

  • haven't heard anything new about the cyber attack, news is now all about Labour's manifesto.

  • As far as I understand it was Microsoft that didn't want to continue. The paid support was always only intended to last until 2015 or 16. Even if the NHS wanted to pay for it, it wasn't there any more.
    However, the NHS was told this in good time, when the original support was withdrawn from XP (2006?)
    It was cheaper to pay for the support than to re write the programs that would only work with XP.

  • As far as I understand it was Microsoft that didn't want to continue. The paid support was always only intended to last until 2015 or 16. Even if the NHS wanted to pay for it, it wasn't there any more.
    However, the NHS was told this in good time, when the original support was withdrawn from XP (2006?)
    It was cheaper to pay for the support than to re write the programs that would only work with XP.


    General Support for XP was withdrawn in 2014, but the gov signed up for an annual 5.5million tailored support deal with Microsoft, but then the gov did not renew it.