Charities ... are they charities as they once were?

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  • Is that what charity shops were about before, or is it just that they weren't doing such a good job raising funds for their charities?
    Again I think you're missing the point - the difference between business and charity is that businesses run to maximise profit for shareholders and all that stuff, while charities may aim to maximise funds raised in order to spend it [helping fluffy bunnies/homeless people/whatever].


    It's not their job to provide you with cheap stuff!

  • Well.. not alot I can say to that is it.. thats me well and truly told lol


    Is that what charity shops were about before, or is it just that they weren't doing such a good job raising funds for their charities?
    Again I think you're missing the point - the difference between business and charity is that businesses run to maximise profit for shareholders and all that stuff, while charities may aim to maximise funds raised in order to spend it [helping fluffy bunnies/homeless people/whatever].


    It's not their job to provide you with cheap stuff!

  • Exactly Ma... whether its true or not but the founder of Help for Heroes for instance, started that out from nothing, gave up his job to run the charity giving himself a salary of 250,000 a year.. thats just obscene!!


    When you see what some of the CEOs of certain charities get paid ,its no wonder the prices get hoiked up !

  • Exactly Ma... whether its true or not but the founder of Help for Heroes for instance, started that out from nothing, gave up his job to run the charity giving himself a salary of 250,000 a year.. thats just obscene!!


    is it though? How much was he earning before he gave up his previous job? What has the improvement been in the fundraising ability of the charity since he has been working there?
    Should a Doctor who is employed by a charity earn less than a doctor who is employed by a non-charitable hospital?
    When a charity employs an accountant should he expect to earn less than from his other clients?
    Someone's skills are as much a commodity as the supplies that a charity purchases from suppliers to carry out whatever tasks the charity has set itself up for, so why should they accept less than the going rate for the duties that they are fulfilling?
    If a charity pays under the market rate for the services they wish you to provide there is a real danger that they will get less able people employed by them, which has a knock on effect on the service they provide.
    If however, the person is getting paid considerably more than the going rate for their skills set / the duties that they are carrying out, then that is indeed obscene.
    IMPO.

  • Well I would agree with you Colin, if it wasn't for this fact
    Most charity shop workers don't get paid.
    If it was just about getting the very best person to do the job, at a market rate, for the good of the charity, they should be getting the same as any other shop worker.
    Sorry but one person getting over £200k from a charity to do anything is nothing short of obscene.

  • Something I always ask chuggers if they stop me on the main drag: "How much is your CEO paid a year?"
    Often many of those at the top of charities are paid more than the prime minister.
    So what we see is a self-perpetuating highly-paid elite at the top, and most of the poor beggars in management getting a low wage, those in low-level management getting minimum wage, and much of the donkey work done by volunteers who get paid nothing. Just a reflection of the few rich and the many poor in modern society.

  • Chuggers don't work for the charity, they work for a company that collects for different charities.


    Can't stand chuggers, it's difficult to walk around these days without them trying to stop you, they can bugger off the lot of them. They work for companies that charities pay to raise money, the chuggers normally have targets of three or four people a day to get. I don't think half of them give a krap about the charity they are raising for, they are more obsessed with meeting their daily target, which would explain why some of them get in peoples faces or are a bit aggressive in their approach.

  • big fan of charity shops but some charge silly money i only give to charities that have affected me and would never give to one who knocks on my door but in saying that young lad from down street ask me to sponser him on a walk as he said honest mister we have got to do something with toilets in scout hut they stink gave him couple of quid

  • The expectation of ordinary folks going into a charity shop, for whatever cause that charity might be, is that the prices of the secondhand gear on display will be very considerably lower than the prices of new gear in the store down the road. Partly because the goods will be secondhand, and partly because they know the charity shop has been given them for free, and partly because they know most of the staff are volunteers who don't get paid, so not costing the charity any wages. There is also the more hazy background knowledge that landlords, especially council landlords, often let charity shops on a peppercorn rent, so the shop isn't paying much rent either.


    All this adds up to the expectation that the goods will be cheap. And if everyone working full-time in the charity was given only a decent living wage, including those at the top, (who would be doing it only because they were enthusiastic for that charity), then the goods would continue to be cheap.


    But as always, much wants more, and those at the top must spend quite some time feathering their own nests, and figuring out ways to pressurise the poor devils beneath them who actually have to do the work. So prices have to go up, because targets imposed from above have to be met.


    This is why quite often small local charity shops have cheaper prices, because they don't have a top-heavy structure to pay for. They may not have fancy displays and they might not all have a good flash, but they more than make up for that with cheap prices.

  • I used to buy all my clothes from charity shops, my jobs were always so low paid I was struggling. Nowadays I can't even afford to buy from charity shops! Unless it's one of those £1 charity shops, but the clothes are usually already badly pilled and faded, out of shape etc that they arent much use other than for decorating. They used to be for poor people, now they are a luxury for rich people wanting 'vintage' hipster items at a cheap price. It is madness!
    And I never, ever see hippy clothes anymore in charity shops. Because everyone knows they can get good money for them online.! :(

  • Is there any chance you could grow some vegies yourself? There is always a bit of spare land somewhere, the use of which can be negotiated for.


    I once bought a nice block of fair trade dark chocolate from an Oxfam shop situated in a labyrinth shopping arcade in the Melbourne CBD.

  • Duckman,there are allotments over here,which you pay low rent for per year.I've got one myself.As for charity shops,I'm afraid I'd rather buy new clothing (Usually heavily discounted)than buy second hand.I do occasionally buy homeware type stuff from a charity shop.Car boot sales are usually pretty good.I saw a job ad the other day for an assistant manager for Bernado's £15,000 odd a year.

  • and really at end of day it shouldnt matter what is happening to the goods once sold.. what ever they sold for is 100% profit and if it bugs the charity that much that people can sell on for more money, then the charity needs to step up and sell online or at car boots too.. but they either cant be bothered, its too much work or some do gooder thinks its below them to do so... this has been my personal experience by the way on trying to help the shop bring in more money.. and suggestions of how to get more donations.. but it was met with excuses on excuses...


    My mum works in a charity shop where they deliberately sell cheap because most of the customers are reselling on ebay or car boots.

  • Charity shops can be good but there are quite afew dodgy ones, remember Fara, they were on the news some years back. Charity shop for abandond children in Romania, this was before they joined the EU. cameras visited the orphanage and found the chidren in an awfull state, walk around Notting hill and there is a Fara shop for the well healed and misinformed.
    My time spent outside the UNISCO complex in Kathmandu I would be witnessing workers arriving in their brand new 4x4 motors, as the gates opened the street kids would rush the gate only to be pushed back. Not very charitable I thought.
    Charity shops dont pay business tax, have cheaper rent,dont pay VAT and the business only has to give 10% of the takings to their chosen charity, on top of that most items are donated and the staff are on low or no pay.
    One charity shop I noticed was selling cotton trousers for two pound more than the new price.

  • Be careful of telemarketing charities. Only 50% of what you give goes to the charity. Also whenever I tell them you do not have a credit card, I usually get an application for one in the mail a few days later. By all means give to a worthwhile charity. anyone who donates is entitled to believe that their donation is put to good use. What about local good causes? I like buying a cake from a charity cake stall as I am getting a better cake than anything from the shops and I helping in the cause. My Mum's church when she lived in Henley-on-Thames would sometimes have bring and buy sales.

  • Be careful of telemarketing charities. Only 50% of what you give goes to the charity. Also if you tell them you do not have a credit card, I usually get an application for one in the mail a few days later. By all means give to a worthwhile charity.


    Easy way to avoid them is to keep the landline phone unplugged and just use your mobile phone to contact people. We have our internet package but keep the landline unplugged, we never get any shitty cold calls as a result. :)

  • or.. get rid of all landline stuff and surf off neighbours wifi lol


    I do .. with permission though.. :)


    Easy way to avoid them is to keep the landline phone unplugged and just use your mobile phone to contact people. We have our internet package but keep the landline unplugged, we never get any shitty cold calls as a result. :)