Rent out Your Van when not in use

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  • It would be daft do do it from your own :reddevil:


    I have to bow to your superior knowledge in these matters Ha Ha!


    but for the person having rented out the room its no fun having to fend off bailiffs and debt collectors knocking on your door for the next ten years trying to seize your goods.


    These bailiffs are not like you see on the TV, doing it by the rules. The real ones will just push you out of the way and walk in.

  • True.The last house we were in was an ex "seized repossession" house, rented out and baliffs,threats,letters were still coming for the ex tenants 5 YEARS on.They just thought we were lying about not being them, despite being shown bills,council tax stuff and sent to the council to check.The ex tenants were also still getting goods billed to our address for 2 months and picking them up from us claiming it was a mistake until we realised .Total scumbag cons.

    I have to bow to your superior knowledge in these matters Ha Ha!


    but for the person having rented out the room its no fun having to fend off bailiffs and debt collectors knocking on your door for the next ten years trying to seize your goods.


    These bailiffs are not like you see on the TV, doing it by the rules. The real ones will just push you out of the way and walk in.

  • I have to bow to your superior knowledge in these matters Ha Ha!


    but for the person having rented out the room its no fun having to fend off bailiffs and debt collectors knocking on your door for the next ten years trying to seize your goods.


    These bailiffs are not like you see on the TV, doing it by the rules. The real ones will just push you out of the way and walk in.


    I would agree that all the bailiffs that I have experienced were no angels , but they always bought the police with them in my dealings , and that has a somewhat calming effect on them , in fact they have known to be helpful, one lot even fetched a landrover and towed us 300 yards off a field , but then refused to give us a tow to get our truck started , that's when the police stepped in and helpfully tow started us with their transit .in fact they were so helpful ,they gave us a police escort for 10 miles out of the borough to make sure we did not break down !

  • seems like it might be a good way to supplement your income if you like building things, just build a van specifically to rent out and make sure the contract and insurance are up to scratch.


    If something bad does happen well then it was just a van and you're covered for damages and if nothing does you may recoup the cost and make a little extra over a few rentals. People are often asking how they can make money on the road, well a couple of rental vans would keep you in money for the summer i dare say.

  • Surely, anyone who has the money to rent a van would just go out and buy one? Unless we are talking about mega expensive holiday vans


    Not everyone wants to own a van, aside from practical issues like having somewhere to park it and having to pay for its upkeep all year round it's often less hassle to rent something someone else has to look after.


    Guy who comes to a regular meet up i go to once a year always rents a camper van for the long weekend, but that's the only time he ever uses one so the 500 odd quid he spends on it is still cheaper than owning one.

  • sometimes a campervan /motorhome hire is for a real special event , Glasto one year I was parked up inside the wire on a hook up in the disabled parking site , neighbours were in a 100k+ camper that had cost them 1400 quid in rental for 5 days , one of the middle aged couple was in really poor health and just wanted one more festival , this was made possible by the rental camper and hook up for the buggy.....,some times the monetary cost is secondary .

  • Firstly (and this is printed on the V5) the registered keeper does not prove ownership.
    Secondly, we had a driver that had our van for work, he stopped coming in but kept the van. The police told me that, as he hadn't taken the van, but it had been given it (all be it for the purpose of work) it couldn't be reported stolen. They weren't even that interested when I said the driver was no longer insured as he wasn't working with us any longer.
    Eventually we had to scour the streets where he lived and found the van.
    It's all to do with the definition of theft within the law.
    If a vehicle is handed over via a loan or hire, it's not taken without consent. Even if that consent is withdrawn, it's hard to prove to the police the person who has the vehicle does NOT mean to ever return it.


    Also another fact from the DVLA themselves, they do not store any details on the owner of the vehicle only registered keepers, and you are absolutely right a zoo keeper does not own the zoo, a lighthouse keeper does not own the lighthouse and a park keeper does not own the park that is why the criminals calling themselves part of a government dept. cannot remove the personal belongings of the owner only the registered keeper because they have taken ownership, I have a De-registered car that has been driving around the west midlands for years and never been clamped stopped or impounded.

  • What exactly is involved with de-registering a vehicle?

    The DVLA own the plates on the car which is registered as a vehicle when you contact them and tell them you will no longer require any of their products as from now on you will be travelling in your private car, and won't be driving anywhere as driving is in commerce hence why you need to pay tax (Drover) it is a bit more long winded than that but that is the bare bones of it, I still have the letter i sent them somewhere and their reply was I still needed MOT and a full Licence, a friend of mine has been driving for years with DEJURE as his plate and never gets stopped.

  • The DVLA own the plates on the car which is registered as a vehicle when you contact them and tell them you will no longer require any of their products as from now on you will be travelling in your private car, and won't be driving anywhere as driving is in commerce hence why you need to pay tax (Drover) it is a bit more long winded than that but that is the bare bones of it, I still have the letter i sent them somewhere and their reply was I still needed MOT and a full Licence, a friend of mine has been driving for years with DEJURE as his plate and never gets stopped.


    You'll be telling us next that he has no insurance either....

  • The DVLA own the plates on the car which is registered as a vehicle when you contact them and tell them you will no longer require any of their products as from now on you will be travelling in your private car, and won't be driving anywhere as driving is in commerce hence why you need to pay tax (Drover) it is a bit more long winded than that but that is the bare bones of it, I still have the letter i sent them somewhere and their reply was I still needed MOT and a full Licence, a friend of mine has been driving for years with DEJURE as his plate and never gets stopped.


    ?????...am I alone in finding this difficult to comprehend? Perhaps I need to take a crash course in "Woodstockspeak"

  • ?????...am I alone in finding this difficult to comprehend? Perhaps I need to take a crash course in "Woodstockspeak"


    Don't bother trying, it's bullshit.... There's a lot of this "freeman" twaddle on the interwebs... If they think they can invoke ancient "rights" to travel the highways without registering their vehicles, or paying road tax, then frankly, good luck to them....


    What scares me is what happens if they damage property or worse still, a person... It's morally unjustifiable for them to partake in the dangerous activity of traveling (not "driving", mind) in a motor vehicle, without insuring themselves against any damage they might cause...

  • problem with that is you may be aware of it but average cop and magistrate aint , whilst you are arguing your freeman status other more 'sustainable' charges tend to arise from peeps that that just think you are a law dodging smart arse ............

  • The DVLA own the plates on the car which is registered as a vehicle when you contact them and tell them you will no longer require any of their products as from now on you will be travelling in your private car, and won't be driving anywhere as driving is in commerce hence why you need to pay tax (Drover) it is a bit more long winded than that but that is the bare bones of it, I still have the letter i sent them somewhere and their reply was I still needed MOT and a full Licence, a friend of mine has been driving for years with DEJURE as his plate and never gets stopped.


    How does this relate to the Road Traffic Act 1991? A vehicle can be MOT'd on the chassis number but this has to be displayed on the vehicle. I really don't think you would get away with that in the City of London without being shot at.

  • Quirky campers, yeah mine would be a good one to rent out. On second thoughts, I fully agree with Sootyfoots first post. Because of all of the quirks, I wouldn't really want anyone else touching it for fear of disaster.


    Instruction Manual. Please be aware of the following:


    1) Doors
    There is only one key, and it only opens the two front doors. Please be aware of the passenger side door - upon closing, the door will open by itself when you brake, unless the handle is pushed in from the outside. Doors should be locked from the inside, and if the key is accidentally locked inside then smash one of the front door windows as they are easier to find on ebay. If you lock yourself in accidentally, then just unlock one of the doors and get out - remembering to take the one and only key with you.


    2) Starting the Van
    Put the key in, and turn until you hear the fuel pump start. Wait a couple of seconds before starting. When you feel a loud thud, release the key and try to coax the engine onto all 4 cylinders by gently pressing the throttle. Wait until all 4 cylinders are firing reliably before setting off.


    Troubleshooting
    Occasionally, the starter motor will just spin without engaging with the engine. If this happens, follow this procedure:
    a) Open the bonnet. Upon hearing it pop up, you need to use a screwdriver to release the second catch as part of it is missing. Locate the starter motor so that you know what you are dealing with.
    b) With a large adjustable wrench, hit the starter motor solenoid (not pictured)
    c) Retry stage 2.


    If the above does not work after 3 attempts, then you need to remove the starter motor and clean out the solenoid.
    Locate the long 8mm allen key, and remove the three bolts as not-pictured. Two are out of sight, but the non-picture will help you find them. Once they are removed, wiggle the starter motor out and remove all the un-pictured wires. Now, we need to overhaul the solenoid that sticks. No-one knows why it sticks, but overhauling it always works.


    Overhauling the Sticking Solenoid
    Remove the solenoid from the starter motor, and remove the plunger. With a petrol-soaked cloth, clean all of the parts including the plunger/slider. Now, reassemble and re-fit the solenoid to the motor. Re-fit the starter motor to the engine, this is the reverse of disassembly. Close the bonnet, get back in, and try starting it up again. Lets assume it works this time.


    3) Driving
    Lets assume the engine is running, and you are ready to go. You might have noticed that the fuel tank is empty - this is normal. The gauge doesn't work. Neither does the oil warning light, so regular manual oil checks are necessary. When filling up, remember how much you have put in - and for every 20 liters the van will do about 110 miles. The van drives like a regular car, except the steering will give your arms a workout because it is so difficult to turn. Also get used to the fact that the steering wheel goes round several times more than you think it should do. When driving, it is important to swerve to avoid large pot-holes, or sunken drain covers. This is because the torsion bars at the front have been slackened right off - and the impact from a large pot hole will dislocate the suspension components. Re-fitting by the roadside is outside the scope of this manual.


    4) Parking up for the Night
    Find somewhere remote. It is unlikely that you will be allowed on a public site. Note that the external appearance has the added bonus of scaring most normal people, so you will tend to be left alone. The procedure for stopping and parking up is as follows:


    a) Turn off key. Sit still and quiet for a moment, checking for odd noises or burning smells. Breathe a sign of relief.
    b) After 5 minutes, open the bonnet again. Double check that nothing is burning. Check the oil level, and top up if necessary.
    c) Close the bonnet and get back in. Check there are no new burning smells. Lock both front doors from the inside, and crawl into the back. Switch on the lights. Check that nothing is burning.
    d) Check that there are no new burning smells, and check that nothing is burning. Close the curtains. Make sure they're not burning.
    e) Get into bed, have weird dreams. Enjoy the rest of your adventure! Thankyou for renting this van from QuirkyCampers!



    I really need to get out more...

  • I did rent out my bus to a couple of bands, one of them was Killing Joke:eek: but it was on the understanding that the drivers seat and the bedroom was all mine. I couldn't have watched someone else drive my home away.
    When we flew to the UK for Glastonbury a few years back, we hired a mini camper. Seemed like a good solution.