Young Driver Insurance

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  • Hi I'm looking for some help/recommendations as I just recently started looking into the idea of living in a van and it really seems like a good choice for me. However, I don't have a driving license yet and I'm just nearly 20 so even when I pass my test I'm worried that I won't be able to afford the insurance on a van.


    Is it just sort of a wait until I'm older/more experienced before getting a van so that it'll be cheaper? Or is there anything I can do that will help the cost go down?

  • Making sure that the van is registered as a camper will normally get you a cheaper policy.


    I do not know about nowadays,but when I was in my early twenties I had a 7 tonne lorry which I insured for less than a couple of hundred quid,as it was registered as a motorhome. I paid much more when I had a mark three ford escort !!


    sleeping with an insurance broker may help too :reddevil:

  • Hi I'm looking for some help/recommendations as I just recently started looking into the idea of living in a van and it really seems like a good choice for me. However, I don't have a driving license yet and I'm just nearly 20 so even when I pass my test I'm worried that I won't be able to afford the insurance on a van.


    Is it just sort of a wait until I'm older/more experienced before getting a van so that it'll be cheaper? Or is there anything I can do that will help the cost go down?



    Is there a way to find out the possible costs of insurance early on - That might give you an idea but what is the alternative for you - paying to rent or van life.

    [FONT=&quot]“In the midst of winter, I found there was, within me, an invincible summer.” – [/FONT]

  • Is there a way to find out the possible costs of insurance early on - That might give you an idea but what is the alternative for you - paying to rent or van life.


    I've had a look on comparison sites using an example of information and got quotes of £2000+ a year so still cheaper than rent I suppose

  • Making sure that the van is registered as a camper will normally get you a cheaper policy.


    I do not know about nowadays,but when I was in my early twenties I had a 7 tonne lorry which I insured for less than a couple of hundred quid,as it was registered as a motorhome. I paid much more when I had a mark three ford escort !!


    sleeping with an insurance broker may help too :reddevil:


    That's really cheap. Would that have to go through a specialist insurer though? I assume I wouldn't be able to make up information to check those if they aren't online :D


    :p if only I knew someone

  • Get at least a year's experience of driving under your belt before you take on a big wagon - get on someone else's policy and/or drive a shitty 1 litre hatchback.


    Something like a Bedford Rascal or Suzuki Supercarry might be easier to insure as they don't cost much and also have tiny engines - you'll be unlikely to get offered classic insurance for a while though.

  • It was a Supercarry I was looking at that turned out around £2000. I guess I will have to wait for experience then, probably try and get on someone else's as I was still getting crazy prices for tiny cars.

  • Here's a tip, and it's legal. Get your own insurance, then add an older experienced second driver. That's your policy, with an added named driver.
    The theory is the insurance company sees it that two drivers can't drive at the same time, so an experienced driver will be at the wheel some of the time.

  • What, sleeping with a broker? I thought that too.


    Just a wild chance that trade cover may be cheaper than "retail" - try Think Insurance, they will know.


    :D


    Thanks, need to call them to get a quote so I can't check now but will try and remember them when I actually get a van

  • ah yes! tried this and got it about £200 cheaper thanks

    Here's a tip, and it's legal. Get your own insurance, then add an older experienced second driver. That's your policy, with an added named driver.
    The theory is the insurance company sees it that two drivers can't drive at the same time, so an experienced driver will be at the wheel some of the time.

  • Get yourself named as a driver on someone elses policy. Then in a years time, you MAY find that some companies will be willing to offer some NCD on your own personal policy.


    I have done this before, listing two cars and two drivers on one policy with a single NCD bonus.
    At the renewal we took out two separate policies and both had the NCD.


    YMMV since they make up fresh rules every week.


    :beard:

  • Just be careful entering your details online. They tend to hold and compare information you submit. There are many ways you can get cheaper insurance, but at your age it's never going to anything like cheap and set to increase in the coming years. You can have a onboard driver monitor. You can agree to drive only within set times of the day. Don't risk pretending a vehicle you own is your dad's vehicle and you go on the policy as a named driver. They are clamping down on that offence. Just keep in mind. £2000 is 4 x years insurance plus for us mature drivers. So budget and safe like fk. Do you smoke dope? If so buy a horse.

  • As alices said above dont get loads of quotes.
    Well actually do, but dont use your own name! Create an email address or use a temporary one. Put some details in same as yours - age, just passed test, same postcode etc then look on ebay for the type of van you want at the price you want.
    Using the reg of that van and a fake name and another address get loads of quotes on the same vehicle. Vary the quotes one thing at a time and write down all the prices. For instance reverse camera fitted tick yes and then no and make a note of the best option. Mileage put various ones in and write the one with the best price down. Job title, you can be creative with this but cannot lie - some titles have better prices. Excess vary this, etc etc. Look at extra courses and the price they cost compared with how much they save. If its an older vehicle look for an owners club, some companies may offer a club discount on classic insurance.


    Eventually you should end up with a list of all the correct answers. Use these when you get your own price.

  • thanks to both Ricky69 and alices wonderland


    I'd been using a fake name and an old email address but hadn't considered varying everything else like that so that'll be really helpful.


    I didn't realise it was quite so different in price, 4x + is pretty insane. I can only really hope that it starts to drop once I get driving it seems.

  • The postcode location of where you 'say' the vehicle will be stored plays a huge part in premium cost too. I'm an older-fart compared to you, and haven't paid more than £250 fully comp for car insurance for a very long time now. BUT, if I tell the insurance company that my car is kept at my folks house (where it used to be parked) instead of where it's really kept, it's an extra £50 on top of that per year. That's like 25% on top of my current premium. If your getting quotes for £2000, then that's £500 just for a change of postcode.


    Limited milage policy will drop the costs too. Less than 5000 miles a year will make a difference. As will increasing the amount of voluntary excess you are willing to forfeit in the event of a claim. There are of course massive pro's and con's for this, and if you need to claim you'll have to cough up the first few hundred £, but personally, if you're insuring a cheap beater first car just to build up no claims, then your not looking to make a claim anyway. Just be careful.
    Sometimes, a fully comprehensive policy will cost LESS than third party cover.
    Use your 'fake' details in a few price comparison sites, as it's easy to change a few details to see what effect they have.


    Oh, and if you can afford to, it WILL be cheaper to pay your premium in one lump as opposed to instalments. If you can afford the instalments, start stashing the money away now ready for when the time comes. You won't miss the money in the long run, and your a year ahead of yourself.

    It's no use shouting about who's to blame, when all that counts is how to change...

  • Don't always assume 3rd party is the cheapest, I normally find it costs more than fully comprehensive so get quotes for all 3 types,


    I have had friends who claim they can't get their own insurance, then you find out they are trying to insure a 1.4 Honda civic worth £4000
    I helped one 18yo last summer who couldn't get a quote for less than £2000 (apparently) get insured for under £1000 by changing his expectation of what he could own.


    I drive a 800cc daewoo matiz worth £100 and insurance is cheap.
    It's not cool, it's full of dents so I won't notice any new dents I add, it doesn't have alloy wheels but is a whole lot better that the bus.


    I find the value of the car makes the most difference so buy something cheap and nasty under 1000cc

  • Funny thing is, I agree AND disagree with every post in this thread.
    The main thing to remember is that the key to getting the best deal is trial and error. What works for us may not work for you.
    You have a 'test' account with price comparison websites you can play with, so have a good think about what you would REALLY like and enter those details in to ALL the price comparison sites. You'll find that even they will provide different quotes for the same brokers even though you put the same details in.
    The quotes you get will even vary by a a tenner or so depending on the time of the month you get the quotes! A lot of comparison sites will honour your quotes for a few weeks, so that can work in your favour too.
    Generally speaking, a cheaper car will be cheaper to insure, but a lot also depends on how cheap the parts would be to repair it in the event of an accident. A sub £1000 car can very easily cost more than it's actual worth to repair. From this point of view it pays to chose a vehicle that is a very common sight on the roads, as popularity will bring the cost of spare parts down. Plus there'll be plenty of second hand parts available in scrapyards that you can fit yourself (thats a whole different learning curve though).



    On the subject of scrapyards, they are great places to take a closer look at different vehicles that you might want to buy. You can have a good nosey round them without any pressure from a sales person, and you can have a good look at areas you wouldn't normally look at on a sales pitch. You can also gauge a good idea of what the common problems are with particular vehicles, as the problem parts will be the ones that usually get removed first.


    So, in hindsight, it might be worth spending a little more on insurance costs for a potentially more reliable vehicle that you have to spend less time tinkering with.

    It's no use shouting about who's to blame, when all that counts is how to change...

  • The way it was explained to me was that it's not the value of the car you're insuring, it's the damage you can do with it. So the car might only be £500, but if you hit a Porsche the payout will be thousands. That's what they worry about.


  • That doesn't work anymore, we tried that with my son. The policy price just defaults to the premium for the young driver. My car with just me driving £270, with my son added as named driver £3,200

  • Here's a tip, and it's legal. Get your own insurance, then add an older experienced second driver. That's your policy, with an added named driver.
    The theory is the insurance company sees it that two drivers can't drive at the same time, so an experienced driver will be at the wheel some of the time.


    Again they are getting smarter, that only works if the named driver is an immediate relative. Tried it last week

  • No, it's the other way round, as I said in my post.
    It's the young driver's car and policy, with an older experienced named driver.
    Having a policy with the young driver on it is called fronting, and if it's really the younger driver's car it's illegal.