WATER OR ROAD ???

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  • I had a 28 ft boat i lived on in Pembrokeshire on a tidal estuary fir a while and loved it.Bit exciting in severe storms even in the estuary and a PITA getting on and off the boat by dinghy tender....I kept the boat but moved into a static caravan 2 years later as it was just too much hassle ferrying gas fuel wood and food in the tender...ok in summer but not so ok in raw mid winter ...Id love to do it again but it would have to be on a bankside or marina mooring with parking for a van before id seriously move onto one again and would have to be river or tidal stretch, id find the canal s too restricting personally...not
    to mention the horrendous costs involved with safety certification.

  • Or get a van with space to keep a small boat on the roof :P


    I've always found it odd that living on a boat is seen as socially acceptable (if a little eccentric) but living in a van somehow makes you a wrong'un.

  • Yes well after i gave my big boat up i only had my rowing scull and kayak on my vsn roof everywhere i went but youre perfectly right,there is a strange difference in perception of people living in carsvans and vans to them what lives in boats...due to ignorance mostly.

  • I've always found it odd that living on a boat is seen as socially acceptable (if a little eccentric) but living in a van somehow makes you a wrong'un.

    Nomads on the roads have always been suspect through their association with gypsies, travellers (New Age or otherwise), etc. Whereas I have it on good authority that all the nice girls love a sailor**



    ** poor chap must be exhausted!


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  • On water you can get just about anywhere in the world (don't try this with a narrowboat), which is quite a seductive idea.


    Narrowboats are very constraining and rather expensive, and the inland waterways are a nightmare in the summer.


    Thats the main reason i prefer tidal waters..i used to go over to Ireland or round the welsh coast quite a bit....being captive on inland waters would get on my wick after a while.Scottish west coast is brilliant for sailing and kayaking..and plenty of places you can leave your van safe whike youre away...not quite so easy with canal system.

  • If only more investment opertunities were on the table for habitat residing, marinas etc. If they could relax a little on the red tape, holt any increases in licence fees, what a great place it would be on the canals and rivers here in the U.K.
    I've always felt I need to be close to water but never achieved living closer than 10 miles away.
    How hard can it be to skipper a narrowboat singlehanded, with limited physical mobility on some days? I've looked a disabled (wheelchair access narrowboat before, but like everything modified it comes with a price tag. I know bow thrusters and modern equipment make most things possible, but to manage day in day out it could be one hell of a hard ride.

  • with limited physical mobility.. it would be dam near impossibe to skipper a narrow boat singlehanded..( unless of course you didn't go near any locks ).... i have worked the locks on my own before... and it's hard work also you need to be ultra vigilante and nimble.. you need to be able to move quickly and react quickly or the boat will end up on ' the cill ' and sink !.. to try to do that in a wheelchair would be outright dangerous you'd end up in the lock with your boat and no-one around to help:eek:...... France is a different kettle of fish.. all locks out there are operated by lock keepers.. so all you would need to do is steer the boat or throw a line ect... yes it would be very doable in France:clap:.. in a well designed boat

  • i have my eye on a possibilty... correct size for my needs.. loads of work done on he hull .. so no worries there.. only downfall is that the engine has been removed ( for re-furbishment ) work has been completed on the engine but they want £700 to re-fit onto the boat !... am i wrong in thinking this is a lot !:eek:... or does it sound reasonable considering the access required ?... it's a boat afterall so not as easy as replacing / fitting an engine to a vehicle ?


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    i have my eye on a possibilty... correct size for my needs.. loads of work done on he hull .. so no worries there.. only downfall is that the engine has been removed ( for re-furbishment ) work has been completed on the engine but they want £700 to re-fit onto the boat !... am i wrong in thinking this is a lot !:eek:... or does it sound reasonable considering the access required ?... it's a boat afterall so not as easy as replacing / fitting an engine to a vehicle ?

  • Depends on the engine, really...lining up gearbox to propshaft is pretty tricky... And if it's a big lump like a Lister it'll need a specialist crane... £700 doesn't sound too unreasonable to do it all.. and it should come with some kind of warranty too...

  • it's a lister sr3 .. so not enormously heavy... it came out of the boat so it's not as if it's a ' replacement engine ' . so it should go back in reasonably easy :eek:... ah ! didn't think of the engine storage costs !!...???...spoke to the ' broker ' and the price includes fitting and running incl..... AAARRGgHH caution swear word coming.... **** V.A.T.***** ...... just thought that £700 is a lot of wonga for maybe 1/2 a day's work !... wish i could earn that !... their whole set-up seems expensive.... over £200 per month for un - serviced moorings...possible thoughts were to maybe buy an out board ( 100-150 QUID ) .. slap it on the back and drive it outta there... course they gonna want paying just to lift the engine on to the boat :eek:... hhhmmm.. further talks / investigation is re-quired me thinks:insane:

  • got my other eye:eek: on this.. Mercedes Optare Solera 1999 35 seater ***( 201710097906 )


    geeze just shot up 2k in the last hr !... only 20hrs left ... this is the sort of thing i am looking at ( for the road )... a midi coach just the right size for one methinks... seen another one which is most excellent .. but he wants 10k for it and i'd be left with 12 x fulling reclining leather seats that i have no need / use for ... for sale due to retirement .. not bin used for 6 months... so why is there.... wait for it.... swear word caution .... **** V.A.T. ***** .... payable... ??:eek:

  • i agree... that's why i though it was a bit pricey :eek:.. lol i remember stepping the mast on my cateraman ... .. i positioned it bow onto the quayside and attached a rope to the top of the mast... other end attached to a mates tow-bar... he drove slowly forward while i held the baby stays in place .. 2 mins later mast up and secured..:clap:... boatyard says ' why didn't you ask us to do it ? and use the crane ?'... answer = crane hire £25.... mates tow bar = 6 pack of beer.... and by the way i saw your crane operator put 2 holes in the side of another mans boat last week when you put it back in the water :eek:... this .....after making him wait 2 weeks to get a decent crane in to the boat yard to do the lift .. just cus you wanted 1st dibs on the crane to put your daughters boat in the water... :eek:

  • A lot of this decision surely has to do with how much you enjoy being on the water. I bought a 30ft sailing boat at the start of the year because I love sailing and being out at sea. I was living in my van and now share my time between both. The boat is more expensive and requires a lot more maintenance but all of those things are worth it when out sailing. If I didn't like sailing/sea I would most certainly not have a boat as they are a labour of love.


    One interesting point that was mentioned earlier is about social perceptions. When I told people I lived in a van there was that assumption that something had gone wrong in my life to end up in such a situation. Whereas when I now tell people I live on a boat far more people think it’s really cool and express that they have had a similar desire at one time or another.

  • ... I've looked a disabled (wheelchair access narrowboat before, but like everything modified it comes with a price tag. I know bow thrusters and modern equipment make most things possible, but to manage day in day out it could be one hell of a hard ride.


    Sorry, I've only just read this again. I think you are right. Wheelchair access narrowboat? That would have to be a special build surely? No bulkheads to carve up the living space and a lift for getting in and out (at both ends?). Single handing can be a challenge under the best of circumstances, but there is always the unexpected. There have been a couple of occasions when I have had to slam the engine into reverse, hop on to the roof and charge along the length of the boat to catch my chimney before an expectedly low bridge knocked it into the cut. Once that was in a sharp tailwind. Just that once, mind. The fear of being separated from one's boat by an expanse of water focusses the mind somewhat. I try to remember to remove it before I set off if I know there are going to be low bridges or I'm on an unfamiliar route.