What have you 'Wombled' today?

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  • Good idea, but it's a bit early; we haven't had Winter down here yet! (Wore the winter coat just once so far, and gloves maybe twice for short periods).
    You're right about not needing seed potatoes; some of the old guys on our allotments save some of their own, and plant them next Spring. The books tell you this encourages blight, but if it did I guess these guys would not be doing it.

  • Good idea, but it's a bit early; we haven't had Winter down here yet! (Wore the winter coat just once so far, and gloves maybe twice for short periods).
    You're right about not needing seed potatoes; some of the old guys on our allotments save some of their own, and plant them next Spring. The books tell you this encourages blight, but if it did I guess these guys would not be doing it.


    Far to early to plant spuds , the blight thing is a bit of a red herring thing as it requires specific weather (humidity/temperature) to make the disease viable, but chucking any old spuds in the ground might not give the best results. Personaly if I am going to all the trouble and effort involved in raising a crop , I like to keep all the odds on my side .I think the old boys at allotment will know what they are doing , I have my own strain of garlic , but I would not recommend planting stuff from the supermarket :beard:



    Not saying dont plant your old spuds , but be prepared for dissapointment :S

  • True, maybe a little early, I have the bonus of a very sheltered garden with mobile cold frames (reminds me, I need to repair them), so I can jump the gun by a good month with most things. Christmas new potatoes have worked more often than not.
    The blight and disease is usually down to not rotating crops well enough usually. Of course, the crops aren't amazing, but thankfully I don't have to depend on it to survive, as such :)


    Edit - This is of course in my Mansfield garden - I wouldn't bother planting anything until Easter up in the northern wilderness of Gothenburg! :D

  • Saw a nice dog blanket ova the fence in the buildin site. Dint want 2 go in but by luck a mate of mine wos doin a delivery to em. He got it for me. Its grey check an white fluffy fleece clean but a bit damp. It wil b nice wen it drys.

  • I'm un wombling just now , have been giving stuff away and selling stuff. Not sure if I will ever be able to pack my whole life in a VW van again but I'm wanting a lot less stuff in my life.


    I'm being given a new to me pair of rig boots next week which a friend wombled.

  • The O/H wombled two short lengths of the heavy-duty covers that go over narrow open drains, heavy metal about 4 inches wide, 2 and 3 feet long. What can I possibly use them for ?


    Two short bits will go into the bottom of the little rectangular firebox I'm making, to form a grate in the bottom. A copy of this one for the allotment, to boil a kettle on. Mine doesn't fold because it don't need to be portable. But it ain't costing me £60, no sir...

  • You're right Shroom, they are galved. I'm had a bit of experience with galv, mostly at high temperatures when welding, where it is best avoided. These grates aren't getting those sort of temps, but nonetheless they'll only be used outdoors, and we won't be standing over them, particularly the first couple of heatings when loose surface particles will become volatile and gas off.


    Once the outer molecular film of galv (zinc) has burned and gassed off, there is little residual gassing unless the metal temperature reaches toward welding temperatures. Fire rings, used for open fire pits in the garden, are often galved to stop them rusting. (Zinc melts at 787F, and doesn't gas until it reaches 1665F).

  • The O/H wombled two short lengths of the heavy-duty covers that go over narrow open drains, heavy metal about 4 inches wide, 2 and 3 feet long. What can I possibly use them for ?


    Two short bits will go into the bottom of the little rectangular firebox I'm making, to form a grate in the bottom. A copy of this one for the allotment, to boil a kettle on. Mine doesn't fold because it don't need to be portable. But it ain't costing me £60, no sir...


    You won't need a grate in your firebox old lad, unless you intend burning coal.
    If they are dipped galvanised and it's a thick coating, it really will take a fair bit of hot burning off, before anyone gets close to breathing in athe fumes.


    They would make good air vents for your shed floor or shed walls.

  • Ha, ha! Got quite enough ventilation in the shed as it is; we're in a windy spot half-way up a slope!

    Better go into more detail about grate in the firebox: To get a quick hot burn, an inrush of air is required, as you know, to provide oxygen to support combustion. A bit like the air inrush on a rocket stove. So if we have vents low down at the bottom of the box, facing the prevailing wind (see pic in expensive Fire Spout in link), they pull in the air on one side of the fire, giving it sufficient oxygen to combust at a reasonable rate.


    If we put a grate under the fire (15mm clearance), we provide access for the air inrush to reach all of the base of the fire instantly, not just one side. As the air is burned, the vacuum created draws in more air very quickly, so a powerful draught is formed. This results in much faster combustion, so a bit more wood is needed, but combustion is more complete (more oxygen), and the kettle sitting on top gets hot quicker. A series of holes an inch or two down around the sides will encourage secondary burning of any unburned gases just beneath the kettle.

  • i do recall an occasion on site whereby we were waiting on a load of concrete and i found an ACO grate , put a small red thimble shaped bit of plastic from the end of a roll of water service pipe on my finger and strummed the grate washboard stylee , suppose you could actually use them as a washboard and save a trip to the launderette ?

  • Now that's useful; I'll have to go ask the O/H about a washboard. Not that we let our stuff get to the stage when it needs a washboard, of course. But she does like improvised instruments, and does a bit of drumming already.


    AW, you're right, we don't need a furnace or forge for a cup of tea. But I'm used to rocket stoves, which boil a kettle quickly. So I'm just experimenting with this thing, see if it can compete or even be quicker:beard:

  • Wombled an empty carbon dioxide canister ( Valentine Gift )


    Of course we are just going to use it as a garden feature


    But if you are feeling creative you can cut the top off and use it as a crucible for melting aluminium



  • That's so cute Sarah. My first daughter would come out rag and bone-in with me when she was little. Oneday as she lay on the back of the horse and dray. She said, "dad, instead of asking for rags and bones and old metal things, can you ask for Barbie dolls". I smiled and said "no darling, think of my street cred"

  • I am a superwomble! Not too mention collecter of big brownie points. Wos in the van by asda an herd sum shoutin an ppl runnin about outside. Then took the dogs out an culdnt beleve the stuff I saw in a trolley in the car park. It wos small electrics like speakers an radios. So I put the dogs in the van an went in the shop. Came back wiv security. Turned out sumbody had it on ther toes thru a fire door!! Heres hopin I will b able to borrow ther car park from time 2 time ;)