Woah check this beauty out.

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  • I spotted it in Liverpool while getting my passport.



    It's so robust and being a fully serviced commercial vehicle was in immaculate condition!!


    My perfect van!


    How many of these 816's are about? I love the militant looking body on it! Any clues as to what the name of the model is?


    I would deffo paint this matt black or camo green. Or both!

  • The fuel costs are beyond unreasonable. Transporting all that armour plate leaves very little weight for any conversion. If you were to find the windscreen needs replacing through damage or fogging it would cost a fortune. The cab windows don't wind down, so again relying on aircon and extra fuel costs. Like you, I like the shape, look of them. It would certainly get noticed. If it was parked out of the way, say down a lane. They locals would be on the phone to the old bill. Thinking its a bank robbery abandoned vehicle.

  • Haha this post reminds me of when I am driving along the motorway and I keep seeing vans go past and when they do I say: "Oh maaannnn look at that beauty!" or "That'd made a good one!" etc. Best is when someone is with me and I make odd noises of approval at seemingly random intervals and they have no idea what I'm thinking. "Oh yeh.. just saw a nice van/house.." Swear our motorways are like Zoopla or Rightmove for nomads!

  • Keep seeing these around my way, would love one to convert.



    Every time I see that van I do that nod thing that means 'that would convert lovely that would'.


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    Haha this post reminds me of when I am driving along the motorway and I keep seeing vans go past and when they do I say: "Oh maaannnn look at that beauty!" or "That'd made a good one!" etc. Best is when someone is with me and I make odd noises of approval at seemingly random intervals and they have no idea what I'm thinking. "Oh yeh.. just saw a nice van/house.." Swear our motorways are like Zoopla or Rightmove for nomads!


    Ha ha. That's JUST what I do too!

  • UPS stuff does come up for sale very occasionally, but they keep their vans a lot longer than most other companies do partially because they are expensive in the first place!


    Was talking to a mate last night about these trucks and were thinking want one cant get one,rare as rocking horse s+++ to find for sale.

  • If they did decide to sell them on fleet. They would be well out of our price range. These will be classics in their own right and greatly in demand all over the world by enthusiasts. We can wish, we can hope, but unless we are willing to part with best part of 20k for a very high mileage vehicle, sadly we will have to be content with smiling and nodding as we meet them in passing.

  • I saw a left had drive US one converted quite a long time ago which drove me to investigate, basically i think in Europe you have bugger all chance of getting one, but in the US there may be other companies using the same truck and those occasionally DO come up for sale, you can find varying info online. :)


    Here's two examples.


    "Mercedes running gear with a custom built body by Spier GMBH of Germany, There is plenty of these still about but they have been mostly been moved out to the country due to emissions regs in cities, London for example meant all the P80'/P75's had to be replaced by LEZ compliant vehicles.


    You wont find them for sale anywhere, UPS run them into the ground to get their moneys worth, each vehicle due to them being custom built to UPS's specification costs close to £60k and they are built only for UPS, you wont find any other company using them, In Europe anyway. In the US they are readily available off the shelf as a list vehicle.


    At the end of their life they are indeed scrapped, the bodies as someone said are all aluminium and as such don't rust, another reason they keep going for so long. They are routinely resprayed every few years as the brown does fade over time. UPS dont sell their vehicles mainly due to the image, if someone were to have a bad accident in an old UPS truck then despite it not being owned by them or having the name on it people will still associate it with UPS. Same reason when the Sprinters etc are sold off they are stripped of their internal shelving and resprayed white. UPS is very protective of its image and go to some quite extreme lengths to protect it.


    That said however, i have seen a few very old ones converted into campers, these are dated from around 1980 and are LHD so probably came from Germany and weren't owned by UPS."



    "When UPS ground vehicles reach the end of their useful service life and are no longer roadworthy (typically 20–25 years or more, but generally when the body's structural integrity is compromised), they are almost always stripped of reusable parts, repainted in household paint to cover up the trademark, and then sent to the scrapyard to be crushed and broken up. The only exception to this policy is when a package car is repainted white for internal use, usually at a large hub. Prior to scrapping, UPS trucks and trailers are assigned an ADA (Automotive Destruction Authorization) number and must be crushed under supervision of UPS Automotive personnel, which records the vehicle's destruction, as UPS does not re-sell any of its ground vehicles."

  • You see them come up in the US, I remember looking and test driving one at one when I was looking for my live in vehicle, enormous with great head room, but thirsty as heck, they get converted in to mobile food vans a lot. The gearing was quite short for long distence highway use and the one I looked at had a 3 speed autobox.


    Older campervans are pretty cheap in the US and so DIY van conversions are much less of a thing.

  • I'm pretty certain that any armoured van is scrapped at the end of it's life. I worked on the Cash in Transit side of Securicor for a year or so and that's what we were told. The armour plate was apparently reused in new conversions, all of which were carried out by Bedwas Bodywork, a Securicor subsidary, in South Wales somewhere.

  • I've got some German pals who live in an old mobile bank. When they were renovating it they had to take the roof off and get a crane to remove the safes that were inside. The best bit is that they made a sliding roof so now they can lie in bed, roll half the roof back and lie under the stars.


    DSC08737.jpg

  • I'm pretty certain that any armoured van is scrapped at the end of it's life. I worked on the Cash in Transit side of Securicor for a year or so and that's what we were told. The armour plate was apparently reused in new conversions, all of which were carried out by Bedwas Bodywork, a Securicor subsidary, in South Wales somewhere.

    that can't be right as armoured vehicles (cash trucks) come up for sale often on eBay.

  • I think it depends who owns them, I'm sure a big company like Securicor can afford to absorb the cost of building and dismantling their trucks as an extra security measure while smaller companies buy and sell them just like normal trucks, I'd heard Securicor broke up their trucks to keep he details of the armour secret.