Twin wheels - inaccessible valves!

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  • The twin rear wheels on my recently acquired Transit Luton have the valves of the outer wheels facing the inner wheels and vice versa... so it is fiddly to remove the valve cap on the outer wheels and almost impossible to remove the inner wheel valve caps with the fingers.... I have never had a twin wheeled vehicle before...


    I see various valve extensions on ebay and amazon including this one:


    http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/210M…ain_3&hash=item20d76aad85


    Any comments from experienced members would be very welcome!


    Also I am considering a compressor so I don't have to fiddle around on forecourts... this one is inexpensive and has good reviews... The power lead would need extending - which is nothing - and crocodile clips on to the battery would be another simple mod...


    http://www.amazon.co.uk/Ring-R…fRID=1321D0M4FRVDB0XEPSSD


    Anyone had one of these? Any other comments, folks?

  • There's no reason why you should be finding it too difficult. I have a transit twin wheeler flat bed and although awkward, not impossible. Run it into a tyre fitters. See if there's a problem with the set up. Join the ford transit forum. Loads of good advice from their members and replacement parts. If your tyres are good. You will only need to top up pressure once or twice a year. Is it worth carrying a compressor? Some tyre fitting services have adapted air hose nozzles. Makes reaching behind tyres easier. First port of call for you to check out your set up. Compressors tend to be crap unless you buy professional range.

  • Fully understand the double wheel issue.
    I couldn't figure out how to get to the valve between the two wheels, I could see the valve, but there was no way to get an airline to actually reach it.
    The answer I was given was to remove the outer wheels, which I thought a little excessive for checking the pressure.


    Thankfully, I no longer have that vehicle, or that problem.


    I use a valve extender on the motorbike because forecourt airlines will not fit between the spokes.
    The one you showed looks OK, mine is a solid brass right angle.


    Remember to remove it before driving.
    Otherwise it will rip the valve out of your wheel.


    Usually when it is dark/cold/wet/far from help (pick any five from the list)


    The compressor is the same one Halfords gave me as a free gift when I bought my last battery.
    Good piece of kit.
    I use it for bicycle wheels to a very high pressure (180 psi)
    transit wheels (60 psi) to counteract a slow puncture
    and for damsels in distress who have destroyed a tyre in the wilds of Wales and have a flat spare!


    Better to have one and not need it, than need it and not have one.


    HTH/IANAL/YMMV


    :beard:

  • There's no reason why you should be finding it too difficult. I have a transit twin wheeler flat bed and although awkward, not impossible. Run it into a tyre fitters. See if there's a problem with the set up. Join the ford transit forum. Loads of good advice from their members and replacement parts. If your tyres are good. You will only need to top up pressure once or twice a year. Is it worth carrying a compressor? Some tyre fitting services have adapted air hose nozzles. Makes reaching behind tyres easier. First port of call for you to check out your set up. Compressors tend to be crap unless you buy professional range.


    You must have read my mind... I thought after posting of nipping along to a tyre firm in the next day or two...


    With cars and Landies I've always checked pressures weekly... to nip any problem in the bud... it looks a real pain to get a gauge in between the twin wheels... and I have never thought that the gauges on the airlines at filling stations were liable to be accurate... also some of the air-lines only give you a limited time before you have to get another token or whatever... hence my thinking of a compressor.


    But yes... tyre specialists first priority!

  • You can buy several types of valve extensions but mainly they for inner wheels, an important thing to remember is when replacing or refiting outer wheels is to line up hole in outer wheel face with valve on inner wheel, you can get slightly longer valves for inner wheels but they are the pull through type, fitted if you ask when getting new tyre fitted. T here are several types of screw on valve, avoid the equalizer extentions as one puncture results in two rather soft tyres. If you cant get the outer wheel valve caps off maybe just a bit of practise they shouldnt pose a prob, for now if you need to a pair of long nose plyers and if your eyesight lke mine a torch should help.


  • Your experience of the compressor echoes the reviews shown on the link I posted. I'm inclined to get one.


    Interesting what you say about the extension ripping the valve out when driving. But I seem to remember seeing large trucks with extensions permanently in place... (I'd have paid more attention if I'd realised....)


    Maybe some types you can leave in place and some you can't?

  • It is possible when you replace the tyre on motorbike to get a right angled valve fitted.
    More expensive than standard, AND you have to ask for it.


    I have had a tyre with the angled valve, replaced the tyre and asked for another angled valve.
    Turned up to collect my nice fresh wheel and they had fitted a standard valve.
    Apparently it had taken them ages to inflate!!! lol.


    They were not impressed when I insisted they take it all apart and fit the valve I wanted.


    If I had kept the twin wheel beast, I would have had extended valves fitted when I replaced the tyre.
    I might have even gone to my local tyre fitter on a quiet afternoon and got him to change the valves out for me.


    :beard:

  • I think as usual its down to the penny pinchers/bean counters at ford, our old works tranny was easy to check pressures through twin wheels it had bigger holes on wheels and extensions on the valves, now the newer pickup we have is an absolute sod to do i get what you mean i have a compressor at me dads that i use but its easier to check pressures at garage because the inflator had a double haeded thingy.


    i guess valve extensions are the way forward they used to be metal or plastic loads better.

  • yep thems the daddies, tight buggers at ford must have stopped doing them, the old metal rigid things were the best


    It is a 1997 smiley LWB luton... :) it may just be that tyre fitters have extra skinny fingers and enjoy grovelling on the ground... thanks for confirming I'm on the right track!