'Experience: I live in my car' article from the Guardian Weekend

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  • Interesting. There is a woman near us does just that, she tends to stay around the same area where there is a butty bar and a small commune, I see her regularly as I drive my bus past. She has a Citroen people carrier and looks comfortable enough.

  • I read the article. It seems to be explained as "personal choice". But what about the fact that he probably couldn't afford to find anywhere to live, unless he agreed to ridiculous tenancy contracts? Didn't go into that. Probably too political?

  • I lived in a mark 3 escort for a little over a year and enjoyed it. I was working at the cornwall coliseum at the time,so I had private parking down the beach and I had showers and cooking facilities that I could use in the main building,so life was quite easy.
    As long as you are dry,warm and fed,then you can get by happily.


    I feel like a millionaire now in my ldv :D

  • Interesting article, life is all about experiences, it's a great way to live, it's amazing how time flies, I have been in my van since 06,
    trouble is now I can't live in a house, I have tried, but just makes me miserable. I have a great park up in Keswick where I live, it's an
    unused road about 1/2 mile from the town, during the week it is quiet just a few of us, at weekends it is packed from one end of the
    road to the other, it's a sight to see, it is a great community - mainly tourists for the weekend, everyone is respectful, no mess or
    anything, now our local jobs worth county councillor is getting his nickers in a twist about it - said it looked like a 'gypsy encampment',
    so we will see what happens. I say you better get used to it as more and more people are van/car dwelling:D


    Dolly

  • When I was in the van I used to park 1 or 2 nights a week in a big lay-by near where I am now. There was a couple living in a vaux cavalier, they were in the same place every night, I saw them for several months. I felt sorry for them, and like I was in real luxury in my high-top trannie with a full size bed ...

    ' When you feel like giving up, remember why you held on for so long in the first place '

  • If I was on my own I would move into the shed at my allotment. I reckon I could live there without anyone realising especially as I have more than one allotment so I could move between them.


    We have a toilet and running water at one of the allotments, I would insulate the shed well and use calor gas for heating and cooking. I have solar power in my shed already I think I could live quite comfortably for very little money (£40 a year)


    paul

  • Dolly basset its interesting you say that you can no longer go back to living in a house. Ive never lived in a van before but embarking on it this year, i know it will be tough at times but im really REALLY looking forward to it.
    I also know that once ive converted to this lifestyle im going to find it pretty hard to intergrate back into "normal society" whatever normal is.
    Ive also been homeless a few times in my life and it has changed me and my outlook profoundly... i can never accumulate a lot of belongings or clutter without feeling uncomfortable. I live light and havent really settled amongst town folk for years. I did live in the countryside whilst bringing up my son and now i dont have my country property its like- to hell with this - im off.
    Im also suprised by how many women there are that have taken the leap to live in a van. it really is inspiring.

  • Hi Treestump,


    I am 49 now and when I look back on my life I think I have always struggled with house living, I have always craved
    the simple life and like you I have never needed a lot of belongings, living in my van I have what I need not what I want,
    and I am much happier for it. I too am surprised how many women I come across who are van/car dwelling. I am not sure
    I could survive in a car, there is a guy who parks near me sometimes, he is in a car, I see him in the mornings with a
    shirt and tie on ready for work, I do feel concern for him because I don't know how he does it, I have spoken to him
    a few times and he tells me his car gets frozen up in the winter, I feel very fortunate that although my van is small it
    has everything I need to survive, stove, cooker, bed, shower etc.


    I have met many people over the last few years who have come away from conventional living, and I say to them,
    be careful because once you become accustomed to van life it is very hard to go back!!


    Treestump van life can be tough and at times scary, but it can also be a very rewarding and colourful life, your whole
    outlook on life changes and you will meet some very interesting and lovely people, all the best in your van adventure xx

  • If I was on my own I would move into the shed at my allotment. I reckon I could live there without anyone realising especially as I have more than one allotment so I could move between them.


    We have a toilet and running water at one of the allotments, I would insulate the shed well and use calor gas for heating and cooking. I have solar power in my shed already I think I could live quite comfortably for very little money (£40 a year)


    paul


    You've got 2 allotments? You lucky bugger. Been on 5 waiting lists for years and think the highest I'm on any of them is 25th one of them I'm 78th.


  • I also could never live in a fixed dwelling,though I will say that on the contrary to what dollybassett says (though I respect her thoughts and opinions),I do not find anything scary at all about van life and have never found it tough,but between that way of life and a couple of yurts,I have been nomadic for over 2O years,so have probably got very good at it.


    I think that as a rule you will get out of your way of life,what you put into it and if you want your your nomadic life to be perfect,then you can create it to be so.


    Love and light


    Fly xx

  • I think it is a bit different van dwelling when you are female, sometimes you can feel vulnerable.
    Generally I have been fortunate not to encounter too much hassle from people when in my van at
    night, but it does happen, we would all like life to be perfect, but that is unrealistic and sometimes you
    do get bothered. Recently someone threw a firework at my van at night, and yes it did scare me, I have
    had eggs thrown at the van and a few years a go some lads decided to wake me up at 2am by rocking the
    van.


    You learn from experience and you deal with it van dwelling isn't for everyone, because you do need a certain
    attitude to live that way.

  • I'm new to the site
    I've lived in a mondeo estate for 9 months now moving around London as my work moves I don't put much faith in bricks and mortar and you can never really own anything on land but me and monty do fine. It would be nice to meet some likemindeds though not many understand currently near heathrow watching planes through the sunroof

  • Positive article I thought. He seems happy.


    Musicians often do really well - don't need much and can even busk for coin (although this guy does have extra storage). I still have no idea where I would put all my art supplies even in a caravan!

  • Positive article I thought. He seems happy.


    Musicians often do really well - don't need much and can even busk for coin. I still have no idea where I would put all my art supplies even in a caravan!


    I think about this with my books... I'm considering building a little book shelf into my current conversion project for my 'essentials' and sacrificing clothing/food space! Obviously the sensible thing to do! ;)

  • I think about this with my books... I'm considering building a little book shelf into my current conversion project for my 'essentials' and sacrificing clothing/food space! Obviously the sensible thing to do! ;)


    Haha, I hear ya... I once moved from country to country and my suitcases were mostly books, having left clothes and other bits behind lol.


    About 10 years ago I had around 1700 books, I have been ruthless about skimming this down and am currently at 200. 80 are reference books I need, 10 are rare-ish, but the rest I could forego.
    This is from someone who could live in a library lol

  • I must admit it's a bit unnerving at first people can and do walk up to your car and stare at you (sometimes in disbelief) usually curiosity and it's really uncomfortable playing the guitar or using a laptop but a folding stool cured that. I try not to stay in the same place more than a day at a time.

  • Haha, I hear ya... I once moved from country to country and my suitcases were mostly books, having left clothes and other bits behind lol.


    About 10 years ago I had around 1700 books, I have been ruthless about skimming this down and am currently at 200. 80 are reference books I need, 10 are rare-ish, but the rest I could forego.
    This is from someone who could live in a library lol


    Wow 1700 books is a lot.. I've probably got about half of that but I daren't really count! And yes, if I had to live in bricks and mortar, I'd be quite happy in a library! (Maybe my next project should be one of those library buses...)

  • I must admit it's a bit unnerving at first people can and do walk up to your car and stare at you (sometimes in disbelief) usually curiosity and it's really uncomfortable playing the guitar or using a laptop but a folding stool cured that. I try not to stay in the same place more than a day at a time.


    So true, keep moving and nobody seems to mind much.
    This time of year the condensation starts becoming an issue so this week I'm experimenting with staying at a campsite and using small oil filled radiator.
    People sometimes see me making a brew and ask what I'm doing so I tell them I split from gf who kept the flat, to which most folk just say "ahhh" in understanding, though some rude types (I call them sour, not 'rich') tend to stare or say people shouldn't 'have' to live like that but its water off a ducks back now.
    The housing in cornwall is FULL, and I see more and more people living this way, the smart ones ask questions - its amazing hearing others stories, and its usually from those in same situation: poor white straight males .

  • Post by Fire-Tree ().

    This post was deleted by the author themselves ().
  • Yep, until I find a caravan...hopefully before first frosts.


    I live *from* it not in it, you'd go crazy living in a car :)


    I know what you mean it's very boring. I'm looking to upgrade to a double cab canter soon living "from" the cab while building a home on the back. The cad looks interesting so far. I'll post some pics later

  • I know what you mean it's very boring. I'm looking to upgrade to a double cab canter soon living "from" the cab while building a home on the back. The cad looks interesting so far. I'll post some pics later


    Cool, I'd like to see what you've done, might give some inspiration.

  • Post by Fire-Tree ().

    This post was deleted by the author themselves ().
  • I'm currently living 3 nights a week in my unconverted van. Cold, cramped, uncomfortable but the worst part is finding somewhere to spend the night. The local industrial estate had tons of kids in their noisy cars acting like fools, while the dark areas had kids in cars shagging. Built up areas have restricted parking, are too light (glass on all walls) and I'm too conspicuous to passers by. I managed to find one place that was a little remote, to find an ambulance arrive during the night & lorries before 7am.


    Any suggestions regarding park ups?

  • I'm currently living 3 nights a week in my unconverted van. Cold, cramped, uncomfortable but the worst part is finding somewhere to spend the night. The local industrial estate had tons of kids in their noisy cars acting like fools, while the dark areas had kids in cars shagging. Built up areas have restricted parking, are too light (glass on all walls) and I'm too conspicuous to passers by. I managed to find one place that was a little remote, to find an ambulance arrive during the night & lorries before 7am.


    Any suggestions regarding park ups?


    I'm parked next to a big yellow van conversion at the mo is it anyone on here I'm at a heathrow tescos