So, I have a piece of Hadrian's Wall

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  • Back in about 1995 I took a trip to one of the more ruined sections of Hadrian's Wall with my then girlfriend - I can't remember exactly where, but we'd been to the Long Meg circle and headed due north. Anyway, she suddenly decided she wanted a souvenir. I remember thinking it was a bad move then - just one of those things you shouldn't do.

    Rightly or wrongly, I shrugged and let her get on with it - she was kinda mental so stopping her would've been futile. She started digging with her nails - I mean, considering she was also very much into her looks, very feminine, pristinely clean and always wore the wrong shoes, the actual sight of her doing this was insane in itself. :D


    But dig she did, and before I knew it she'd uprooted the brick you see here - and that was it, she immediately lost interest. It sat in my car for months, well right up until I got rid of the car, and then it sat on my fireplace for years, and when I got rid of the fireplace it went on a shelf and sat there for even more time. When I moved in June it came with me.

    Having a slightly different set of ethics nowadays, I'm, like "What do I do?" My email to English Heritage was ignored, so I'll assume they're not bothered. :S


    So, do I hand it in personally, hand myself in, hand her in, leave it, wait until I next go up north and drop it back in to a nearby slot somewhere ... or do stick it back on my shelf, confident that I'll always have a story about the crazy, non-archaeologist, ancient monument, brick-stealing ex girlfriend?


    (Incidentally me and the girl split up in 1996)


    brick.jpg

  • I wonder how many pieces like that are taken every year. Surprising there is anything left. I guess putting it back would be the best bet, but it's [STRIKETHROUGH]just another brick in the wall[/STRIKETHROUGH] a drop in the ocean.

  • Funny what we acquire over the years. I have no moral precipice from which to offer you wisdom, although I have some sympathy with what has already been said. I have a brick from the block of flats I lived in when I was born (where there is now a park) and somewhere I have a door handle from a house Nelson allegedly built for Emma Hamilton, although I can find no written evidence of this. In my defence on the latter I was told to dump it when the door furniture was changed forty years ago. In case the story about the house (now an office) had any truth I thought it better to hang on to it. I had no idea I would end up living in "Nelson's County", as the signs say.

  • Many years ago we had a great holiday in Orkney. Josh wanted a souvenir. On the basis that I didn't tell the truth about the price of the bracelet I love so much that I have worn since the holiday; I have always turned a blind eye to the stone that Historic Scotland might object to being on our bookcase.


    Having said that FriedOnion is probably right.


    In our defence it is a small stone.

  • I reckon you should keep it Paul - memories... Its hardly worth returning it as Fried Onion pointed out "its a drop in the ocean."


    I would have liked to have been in Berlin when they were taking down the Wall I would have treasured a bit of brick.


    Suppose you can buy them off ebay but how would you really know whether or not it came from the berlin wall or a block of flats they were demolishing in Govan Glasgow.

  • Paul. It doesnt matter what you do with it!!!!
    Theres enough evidence in ur original post that on the 19th september the trail will begin. Dont worry it wont take long to convict you as youve already admitted Aden and abetting, conspiracy to steal ancient artefacts and theft of ancient artefacts. You may aswell keep it for now but be ready to return it to, the people party of a free scotland.

  • I reckon you should keep it Paul - memories... Its hardly worth returning it as Fried Onion pointed out "its a drop in the ocean."


    I would have liked to have been in Berlin when they were taking down the Wall I would have treasured a bit of brick.


    Suppose you can buy them off ebay but how would you really know whether or not it came from the berlin wall or a block of flats they were demolishing in Govan Glasgow.


    :)my friends were there and brought me a small piece which is on my shelf still...i wouldnt worry either way paul

  • I'd keep it Paul. The damage has already been done. If you were to take it back up there it wouldn't become part of the wall again, it would just be another loose piece of stone kicking around.

  • I reckon you should keep it Paul - memories... Its hardly worth returning it as Fried Onion pointed out "its a drop in the ocean."


    I would have liked to have been in Berlin when they were taking down the Wall I would have treasured a bit of brick.


    Suppose you can buy them off ebay but how would you really know whether or not it came from the berlin wall or a block of flats they were demolishing in Govan Glasgow.


    I may be wrong but wasnt the berlin wall made of concrete? So if ur buying bricks from it i mite be a bit sus

  • Are you building a wall in your garden any time soon?? I think it would look better in a garden, than on your fireplace. She sounded like a keeper ;)

  • I am sure the builders over the centuries nicked far more stuff than you to build farms houses etc, why not put it under your chair and hold your own parliament refusing to give it to the old scotland, i think if it was me id take it back up there find the spot and re bury it, so that it kind of puts to bed the relationship in a nice way. Ps it looks more like a stone to me

  • I wouldn't be too bothered about a brick (it's quite a long wall, isn't it?). I regretted taking a little piece of metal from a WW2 plane crash site in the mountains when I was in my late teens. When I was in college my friend told me that when she worked in a remote west coast hotel near to another crash site, they were sent a piece of wreckage by an American tourist who had taken it while he was on holiday. He said he'd had terrible luck ever since and begged someone to take it back for him. I returned my piece soon afterwards!


    As others have said though, putting your brick back would be a good excuse to take a holiday :)