Mobile business ideas???

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  • Hi there I am looking for mobile business ideas for mother and 18 year old son.
    My long term plan is to live off grid in about 2 years time and in the mean time I will have to secure an income that I can take with me and do from my off grid site. Currently I work from home but I doubt BT are going to run a phone line to my future dream low impact hut in the woods.
    So any ideas anyone




    My skills are wood working, art, crafts and gardening and my son is rather good at photography and a grafter.



    Will have van soon and just wondered what other people do to earn an income when they are living offgrid.

  • Who needs a phone line* mobile broadband is the way to go.
    Box.


    Good Luck with your low impact hut - Which area are you hoping to be in?




    *well I do, but only because I aint set up the tother yet.

  • OK might be hit or miss this but could be worth a punt. This involves minimal start up costs, you shouldn't run low on stock and bulk ordering could be possible.







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  • Hi Tobyjug
    I cant continue with my existing business as it requires a phone line.
    Hi boxvan yeah sounds like a good idea.
    Mountain air , had to laugh though!

  • Just been in newquay for a few months, caught the early morning surf, fresh salty water up your nose, followed by something you can't bottle,?a full English breakfast; spicky.

  • Highland walking/photography tours
    This may need need broadband to market, but sniff out some awesome off piste photo opportunity sites, arrange 3 day self sufficiency (living in a tent) photo shoots and charge people for the pleasure...oh, throw in some 'make your own divining rods' or whatever to show off your woodworking talents
    Wish you good luck, keep us posted

  • Highland walking/photography tours
    This may need need broadband to market, but sniff out some awesome off piste photo opportunity sites, arrange 3 day self sufficiency (living in a tent) photo shoots and charge people for the pleasure...oh, throw in some 'make your own divining rods' or whatever to show off your woodworking talents
    Wish you good luck, keep us posted


    If you want to do walking tours for money , you will need suitable insurance. If someone has an accident and you will be in deep. to get insurance you will need a suitable qualification.

  • Look at Forestry Commission enterprises taking place up in the Highlands. They have been driving small scale business initiatives, which allow successful entrepreneurs to build/work and reside in log cabins within the forest. It all started back in 2007 ish. I would be up there now. I wanted to apply for the post of coordinator, but its too hilly in spring, midge infested in summer, too pissed in autumn, too bleak in winter :D

  • ... but its too hilly in spring, midge infested in summer, too pissed in autumn, too bleak in winter :D


    So more ideas of work: -
    Get a JCB to make the landscape less hilly in the Spring time.
    Extra potent (natural of course) midge repellent for the Summer time.
    Bulk orders of Coffee for Autumn.
    and millions of LED's to help light things up in the winter.


    Genius.

  • Some good ideas there - walking tours and photography. Thanks... I am still deciding, have thought about planting trees and selling saplings etc harvesting xmas trees, making charcoal and green woodworking facilities... Ive also thought about renovating furniture...

  • Hi Tobyjug
    I cant continue with my existing business as it requires a phone line.
    Hi boxvan yeah sounds like a good idea.
    Mountain air , had to laugh though!


    you know that phones are mobile those days right? :P
    You can get a landline number for your mobile too those days or even externally managed landline numbers and you get the messages in an e-mail or they put the customer through.

  • Maybe you need a mix of activity - that changes with e seasons - so walking tours or free lance guide in summer and something to sustain out with that. I think many visitors to the highlands miss out on so much - Perhaps your actual location will suggest an activity - you need to be close to a tourist centre to get a mass of people to advertise to. Depends maybe on your van - would you take paying passengers - what about insurance etc.


    I just joined here as I am looking at options to live off grid - a simpler life - would welcome any ideas or suggestions but it will be March 2014 before I can sell my house in Dundee and make a move.

  • Andy you may be able to settle this question for me. I believe that if you buy/own land in Scotland then you are able to live on it in a van or caravan etc. Am I correct? If so are there any restrictions?


    Also with regard to the tourist thing I remember seeing a bloke who was van dwelling around the banks of Loch Ness who made his living selling little self made clay 'nessies' to the tourists.

    Yesterdays gone, tomorrows a mystery, today's a gift, that's why its called the present.

  • Andy you may be able to settle this question for me. I believe that if you buy/own land in Scotland then you are able to live on it in a van or caravan etc. Am I correct? If so are there any restrictions?


    Also with regard to the tourist thing I remember seeing a bloke who was van dwelling around the banks of Loch Ness who made his living selling little self made clay 'nessies' to the tourists.


    I am not really certain of the restrictions - it may vary around the country with councils but you never know - buying land can be expensive - or you need someone willing to rent an acre or two. I am currently mailing farmers and other land owners to find land.


    Other than that with a few people maybe even a land grab - must be somewhere -

  • Andy you may be able to settle this question for me. I believe that if you buy/own land in Scotland then you are able to live on it in a van or caravan etc. Am I correct? If so are there any restrictions?


    Unfortunately its not correct. Planning law still exists in Scotland in the same format as the rest of England. Wales has relaxed somewhat to the Ecological/off grid/sustainable development in some parts. Scotland is focusing on rural development with strong economic benefits from residential/business developments.

  • Andy you may be able to settle this question for me. I believe that if you buy/own land in Scotland then you are able to live on it in a van or caravan etc. Am I correct? If so are there any restrictions?


    Also with regard to the tourist thing I remember seeing a bloke who was van dwelling around the banks of Loch Ness who made his living selling little self made clay 'nessies' to the tourists.


    Certainly a good question and I had not thought about some aspects so I checked


    http://scotland.shelter.org.uk…ut_mobile_homes_and_sites


    Note Shelter has sites for England and Scotland so this is the Scottish one.


    Quote

    Are there any sites which don't need licences?


    Yes. A site doesn't need a licence or planning permission if:

    • a caravan or mobile home is parked in the grounds of your home, provided it is only used for leisure purposes and nobody lives in it permanently
    • travelling caravans are parked on a site for no longer than two nights
    • the site is used by an exempted organisation such as the Boy Scouts, Girl Guides or Caravan Club
    • up to three mobile homes are stationed on undeveloped land of five acres or more, provided that they are there for no more than 28 days a year
    • agricultural land is being used temporarily as a caravan site by seasonal agriculture or forestry workers
    • mobile homes are stationed on or next to engineering or building sites, to provide accommodation for employees during the course of their work
    • the land is used by travelling showpeople, provided that they belong to an organisation recognised by Scottish Ministers and are either travelling as part of their business or are taking up winter quarter


    Just what counts under say seasonal etc but it does give me some hope.

  • See no different to planning law in England.
    [h=2]What is a protected site?[/h] To have legal rights, your mobile home must be parked in a protected site. A protected site is one which:

    • has planning permission to be a mobile home site, and
    • has been granted a site licence, or
    • is run by the council.


    And so it goes.




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    [h=1]About mobile homes and sites[/h] [h=2]Contents[/h]


    This advice applies to Scotland only Get advice if you're in England.
    If you live in a mobile home your tenancy rights depend on whether your property meets the legal definition of a mobile home, and whether you live on a 'protected site'. This page explains what these terms mean.
    [h=2]What is the legal definition of a mobile home?[/h] A mobile home is defined as:

    • a structure designed to be lived in that can be moved from place to place (eg, by being towed or transported on a trailer or motor vehicle), or
    • a motor vehicle designed or adapted for you to live in.


    The maximum size of a mobile home is 60 feet long (exclusive of any draw-bar), 20 feet wide and 10 feet high inside. Be aware that if you add a porch or extension to your mobile home, it may take it outside the legal definition, although if the attachments can easily be removed, they can be disregarded.
    Railway carriages and tents do not count as mobile homes.
    Your mobile home may be classed as a 'dwelling house' rather than a mobile home if it:

    • has mains supplies of electricity, water and telephone, and
    • is used as a permanent residence, and
    • is static and cannot be moved, or
    • is so large that it cannot be moved in one piece.


    [h=2]What is a site?[/h] A site is an area of land on which mobile homes are situated. A site can contain one mobile home or several hundred. Residential mobile home sites are often referred to as parks. The area of land within the site where the mobile home sits is called a pitch.
    [h=2]What is a protected site?[/h] To have legal rights, your mobile home must be parked in a protected site. A protected site is one which:

    • has planning permission to be a mobile home site, and
    • has been granted a site licence, or
    • is run by the council.


    All residential mobile home sites or parks should have a licence which makes them protected sites.
    If you buy your own land to station a mobile home on, you'll still need planning permission and a site licence. You can get these by writing to your local council.
    [h=2]What is a site licence?[/h] Site licences are granted by local councils. They can impose conditions which the site owner must keep to in order to retain their licence. Conditions can cover:

    • the number and type of mobile homes allowed on the site
    • any restrictions on when mobile homes may be stationed on the site (for example, for a limited period of time only, or only during the summer months; this must be in agreement with the planning permission)
    • where on the site the mobile homes can be put and how far apart they should be
    • landscaping (for example, the planting of trees and bushes)
    • fire precautions
    • electricity, gas, water and sewerage supplies
    • other health and safety issues.


    The only protected sites which don't require licences are those which are run by the council.
    [h=2]Can I see the site licence for my mobile home park?[/h] If your site has more than three mobile homes, the site licence should be displayed so that all residents can see it. If the licence is not displayed and the site owner won't show you a copy, contact the council and ask to be sent a copy, or arrange an appointment to see the licence at the council offices. Usually the licence will be held by the environmental health department.
    [h=2]What if the site licence is being breached?[/h] The page on park conditions tells you what to do if you think the site owner of your park is not complying with the licence.
    [h=2]Are there any sites which don't need licences?[/h] Yes. A site doesn't need a licence or planning permission if:

    • a caravan or mobile home is parked in the grounds of your home, provided it is only used for leisure purposes and nobody lives in it permanently
    • travelling caravans are parked on a site for no longer than two nights
    • the site is used by an exempted organisation such as the Boy Scouts, Girl Guides or Caravan Club
    • up to three mobile homes are stationed on undeveloped land of five acres or more, provided that they are there for no more than 28 days a year
    • agricultural land is being used temporarily as a caravan site by seasonal agriculture or forestry workers
    • mobile homes are stationed on or next to engineering or building sites, to provide accommodation for employees during the course of their work
    • the land is used by travelling showpeople, provided that they belong to an organisation recognised by Scottish Ministers and are either travelling as part of their business or are taking up winter quarters.


    However, as these sites are not protected, residents will have fewer rights.

  • So getting back to the original post -


    Sorry Sam did not mean to sidetrack your thread.


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  • in many towns there are groups who look for speakers ... if you have a specialist subject you can talk on check out town noticeboards for organisations ... or start your own speakers group. I used to help run one .. we called it Open Minds, held it in Quaker Meeting Rooms, charged people £2 ... used to get about 100 people a month turn up, and within that group will be people worth knowing for further ideas etc . . .