Diesel £1.43 a litre. LPG 79p a litre. What does converting involve!?

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  • I was putting some diesel in today and noticed a strange-looking pump on it's own nearby. It turned out to be LPG, and when I saw the price of it my head nearly fell off. It was around half what diesel costs!
    Now at that price there must be a good reason why every vehicle isn't coming from the factory ready to use LPG, or that every garage in the country is doing conversions all day long.
    At the moment it doesn't seem so commonly available, and I'm sure once it is and becomes popular our glorious leaders will bring the price in line with petrol and diesel (anyone else recall diesel costing a small fraction of what petrol cost?).
    Anyway, does anyone here know anything about the conversion, pros and cons, experiences etc? I understand you can temporarily switch to petrol back to petrol if you can't find an LPG pump.
    Is the LPG the same as the stuff in our gas cylinders for cooking, heating etc, and therefore if so could I set up my van's gas to come from an LPG tank?
    It would be fascinating to know more about it, and I trust the folk on here more than that Google bloke, whoever he is! Thank you. Dave.

    Not a shred of evidence exists in favor of the idea that life is meant to be serious.

  • I had an LPG conversion on my old 1976 MK1 Transit ...


    Waste of time for me tbh because it cost me around £1000 to get fitted and, because it was an old vehicle running on distributor and points, was an absolute nightmare to keep tuned.


    While this won't apply to other vehicles, on steep hills I had to switch back to petrol as it was just too sluggish on LPG.

  • I dont think that you get as many mpg on lpg which would reduce your savings a bit. However, if you do a lot of miles, taxi driver for example like someone i know, then i think you could soon recoup the conversion cost.

  • Converting lpg on diesel isn't like I'm petrol motor, you still need to run in diesel with lpg injected into cylinders to allow a more efficient burn. It raises your mpg rather than running on pure lpg.

  • Is the LPG the same as the stuff in our gas cylinders for cooking, heating etc, and therefore if so could I set up my van's gas to come from an LPG tank?
    .


    basically yes, I have a friend with a tank that he tops up with LGV to use for cooking etc rather than buying the bottles

  • basically yes, I have a friend with a tank that he tops up with LGV to use for cooking etc rather than buying the bottles


    That's fantastic. So possibly we can buy a kit to install an LPG supply in our vehicles for cooking etc, and maybe have a back-up cylinder. LPG in cylinders seems to be about £5 a litre (have I got that right?) so it is one sixth the price from the forecourt pump.


    As for motoring though, nobody seems too enthusiastic about it, so I suppose it is just not significantly more economical to make it worthwhile converting, unless you're doing a lot of miles. I need to find out what is involved in the conversion job just in case even I could do it. If it costs around £1000 to convert then I'm thinking labour may be half of that, so perhaps a kit for £500 would make it less of a bad idea.

    Not a shred of evidence exists in favor of the idea that life is meant to be serious.

  • You cant use the same tank for both, cant remember which way round it it but domestic supplies and engine supply feeds from the top or bottom of the tank.


    My big old Chevy camper had LPG for the engine and for cooking/heating and used two tanks, you can however fill both up at a pump.


    Older petrol engines are easy to convert providing they have hardened valve seats already its really just a matter of adding a mixer plate under the carb, plumbing in some pipework and the tank and switch to turn it all on its a fairly easy DIY job, however almost all insurance companies will want it inspected by a ticketed fitter to make sure it's safe.


    Fuel injected cars and vans can still be done DIY with second hand gear but usually have a little more wiring and often require drilling into the inlet plenum to fit extra injectors.


    More modern stuff with the really sophisticated fuel systems are best left to the experts.


    I have bought complete old cars in the past just to get the systems off for one of mine and then weighed in the motor, IF you can get the gear second hand and IF you can mostly fit it yourself you can save money faster, on a live in you'll save money even quicker if you currently use gas bottles, but bear in mind if you want to travel that the Euro tunnel has gas capacity limits in place now i think. My Chevy could carry over 400litres of gas!


    You do get slightly less mpg on gas than you do on petrol BUT only if you run duel fuel and want to keep the petrol system, if you run purely on LPG it's usually slightly MORE economical, the more modern fully ECU controlled stuff is better in this respect as it can fully retune the engine for when you're on gas.


    http://www.tinleytech.co.uk/ are very good and also run courses so you can ticket your own instal. :)


    Oh, and the reason it's cheaper is because it gets tax breaks because it burns cleaner, although it has continually had this renewed it has never been said by the government that its permanent so bear that in mind too.


    It would be pretty cheap to set up a tank just for your domestic supply and you would make that cash back pretty quick, in fact you can get kits that use refillable gas bottles, if you travel abroad though make sure you have the adapters, they all seem to use different pumps.

  • Yip - Like Paul says, about £1000 for fitting and extra for the kit. I have thought about it for my old landrover, but the tank bottle will take up a lot of space in the rear tub.

  • Cooker uses the vapour and engine uses the liquid so two tanks needed, its not worth gassing diesel motors as it takes to long to see a return. i fill my own bottle at the fuel station for my hob as its much cheaper.

  • Cooker uses the vapour and engine uses the liquid so two tanks needed, its not worth gassing diesel motors as it takes to long to see a return. i fill my own bottle at the fuel station for my hob as its much cheaper.



    Hey is that right? never thought of doing that, so i could fill my old mans calor gas bottles for his gas fire or would it burn the jets out or soot em up etc?