cycling

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  • ok I would like to get back in to cycling , but i've know one to cycle with , what tips and handy hints do you have that could help me get out and about on my bike please :D

  • I bought some cycle leggings with a padded rump from Aldi........... not that that has helped me get my bike out :O Join a local club?

  • today i went round three village's local to me all about 2 miles apart, I set it out as i just need to get to the next village and carried on like that , I have somewhere some cycling clothing (use it out on the dirt bikes under waterproofs) and i do have abit of a plan , its 2.5 miles to my nearest cash machine so I'll cycle and get my money on a saturday , but my plan it i'm 6 miles from work and i would like to cycle to work in the spring and summer , to keep me fit

  • today i went round three village's local to me all about 2 miles apart, I set it out as i just need to get to the next village and carried on like that , I have somewhere some cycling clothing (use it out on the dirt bikes under waterproofs) and i do have abit of a plan , its 2.5 miles to my nearest cash machine so I'll cycle and get my money on a saturday , but my plan it i'm 6 miles from work and i would like to cycle to work in the spring and summer , to keep me fit


    Sounds like a plan. My bike is ancient, and was finally returned to me in the summer after being on loan to many people for a long time. I will start cycling with my neighbour once its dried up a bit. I think we have a cycle path to the next big town on the old railway line.

  • Being old isnt a problem for bikes - my only current working bike began life as a 3-speed gents' cruiser sometime in the 70s or 80s. The original rear hub gearbox lasted until late last year - it's now a singlespeed as I couldnt find an affordable replacement 3-speed wheel.

  • I'm a keen mountain biker so I mainly ride off road for fun in all weathers. No idea how much mileage I clock up because I ride up hill & down dale kind of riding.
    I'm lucky because I love being on my bike so I'm driven to ride more & put more time on it. When it comes to exercise I always say try to find something you love doing & do that. I hate stuff like jogging for instance, I just font have the interest at all lol


    But if you need to know anything about bikes I do all my own maintenance & repairs so am pretty clued up on push irons

  • My advice is to build up slowly and to remember it doesn't get easier, you just get faster.


    When it comes to climbing hills, put any bravado behind and remember you are not Bradley Wiggins and drop down to the easiest gear you can manage to spin at a decent rate. You will climb at a snails pace, but who cares, at least you will reach the top, most probably with your lungs burning and legs that feel like jelly mixed with pain.

  • Yep, on hills its better to drop the gear drastically so your legs are still turning at a reasonable rate.


    When I'm cycling to work sites I take it at a fairly relaxed pace. But when I'm out to do my body some good for the first time in a while, cycling or hill walking, it'll take me as much as 20 mins of hardish push to reach the point where I fall into a good rhythm. Half of the effort is my muscles and half my efforts in getting enough oxygen in. But once they're pumping in tune, distances seem much less challenging and I'm enjoying it ...




    When I'm keeping it regular, the warm up is much easier and quicker.



    In my early twenties, I did try to settle down once, got a job at Holdsworths cycles for a while, doing deliveries. I didn't have the obsession that I'd had as a young kid, cycling across the Country, but saw it as a job...Ha....Derek Cottington worked there(UK Amateur time trial champion back then)... after work I often ended up racing twenty miles down the A3 to Guildford where he lived, and then do the twenty miles back... to a squat in Penge, just round the corner from the factory. :rolleyes:

  • I found the road cycling scene around Manchester really friendly and sociable, every weekend official and casual trips out destination mainly pubs and plenty of evening and hols stuff as well, also comps if you wanted it. I dropped real lucky with the group I was with and still chat to most of the guys I used to ride with. Cyclists are realists and know what it is like when you have been out of the saddle for a while and set routes accordingly.
    I would imagine with FB etc it is now easy to spot a group you would like to join. But it is addictive and fun, I still trolley about now at my own pace.:D

  • Used to cycle lots, build up ther milage and try not to push to hard so your breathless, the biggest fitness gains come when your working arobic rather than anerobic. We used to ride nothing but steady between 1st jan and mid march trying to get 2500miles in before starting speed work! The key is just getting out and enjoying it :)

  • The club I joined at that time, definitely had a no pain, no gain philosophy. We'd be out training all winter, pushing as hard as we could, regardless of rain or snow, and Ron Keeble, an international rider from the sixties, who was our trainer, had a penchant for finding endless steep hills.

  • Luckly my coach was a bit used a bit more science behind his methods. We even had early heart rate monitors and he would harp on about zones and stuff! But when racing and doing speed work it was balls out and no excuses! Once before I riding a hill climb I asked for any advice, he said go out hard as you can and hang on till you cross the line, if your lungs are still In your chest and you don't throw up you should of gone harder! Got to the top and then threw up, he looked at me and smiled said what was your max heart rate? Never forget it was 214 and he said bloody hell you shouldn't of gone out so hard!! :D

  • Yep, I'd say go with the ticking over approach. Keep spinning easily and you'll build up speed over lots of rides like folks say. I used to do lots of off road cycling up the road. Stopped when i started the whole family thing then slowly got back into cycling but on road rather than off. What a difference age makes :whistle:
    Take it easy, the hardest bit is getting on the biike from your nice warm house. Once your rolling along it's great, you'll find yourself miles away without realising it.

    Through violence you may solve one problem, but you will sow the seeds for another...

  • One of my new year's resolutions is to take up cycling. I did a little when I was a kid, but didn't progress to doing any journeys on roads. I found my local council had sponsored a cycle training scheme, and went on their Level 1 course. It was brilliant - and has really got me started! So I would suggest you look around for anything like this in your area. Here are a couple of organisations I know of that do cycle training - www.bikeright.co.uk and www.cycletraining.co.uk


    Good luck with it!