Homebrew wines

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  • our rhubarb, japanese knotweed and himalayan bolsom wine is ready and yummy now :D a great way to deal with invasive species :P


    we're gonna check out carboot sales soon thanks aliceinwonderland! wilkos has lots of good stuff as well tho my oh checked it out today :) pity it's not legal to sell the wine you make lol!

    we reenact Noah's ancient drama, but in reverse, like a film running backwards, the animals exiting

  • God knows what Japanese knotweed would do it got into yer bowels.... I dont think I could drink it knowing what the potential damage is :D
    xx
    den

  • Making this now would see a nice tipple in time for Xmas. I`ve used billberries (or whaever yer call em!)...cos they were cheap at the time...and i made a batch with Gin, and one with Vodka.
    Various recipes say use good quality alcohol etc..and i`m sure it adds that extra edge...but tbh...I`ve used the cheapest...and the results are more than adequate.
    Kilner Jars are a couple of quid in Wilkos...



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    The fruit...thisd applies to sloes/damsons etc... I did faff on and prick em all (i`m single...got nowt esle to do)...some say freeze em--then bash them. But all you need to consider...the alcohol and sugar need to permeate into the fruit.
    I used 250g of sugar. Remember-- you can sweeten afterwards....so do`nt over do it.


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    Tip all the ingredients into the Kilner Jar and mix thoroughly... watch you dont spill any...its sticky! mine came up to just over 2/3rds of jar.


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    For next 2/3 weeks swill around daily to disperse things...you`ll see the colour starting to change and a deep hue takes over.
    Then...store in a cool dark place and leave alone for a few months.
    If you have filtering gear...then by all means filter it...you could use Coffee Filters at a push.
    I havent bothered... I just tip it into me shot glass and knock it back.
    Theres no sloes or damnsons around here...so I`m stuck to make those.
    Have a go..its easy peasy lemon squeezy.
    Next up is Skittles Vodka.....
    xx
    den

  • First time properly having a go at wine for me.


    I currently have 3 D/Js of Elderflower wine, 2 D/Js of Rose petal wine and 2 D/Js of honey wine doing their 2nd round in the D/Js. The quick taste when siphoning was very promising. All but one of Elderflower are clearing nicely.


    I did read in a few places, that moving to a colder place can help clearing....I have purposely decided not to use any finnings for this until I can locate something which is vegan/veggie.

  • First time properly having a go at wine for me.


    I currently have 3 D/Js of Elderflower wine, 2 D/Js of Rose petal wine and 2 D/Js of honey wine doing their 2nd round in the D/Js. The quick taste when siphoning was very promising. All but one of Elderflower are clearing nicely.


    I did read in a few places, that moving to a colder place can help clearing....I have purposely decided not to use any finnings for this until I can locate something which is vegan/veggie.


    Good on yer!! You can always just use a Filter instead of finings. Keeping them in a cool place does help clearing and also any secondary fermentation too. The Honey sounds intertesting...Mead I suppose...
    Good luck with it all.
    xx
    den

  • ....and now we have 10L (2xD/Js), of Blackberry/Dewbury wine in the fermenting bucket, freshly picked this morning.


    This time next year you may notice that my spelling and general grasp of language skills have given up on me :D

  • Well done, Irish moss is good if your wine is being really stubborn. My plum wine refused to clear, so I ended up bottling it, and its cleared nicely now :( May rebottle it as the sediment is not good for it to sit on. Some wines just want extra time

  • Last night I made my first effort at Nettle wine, 2 gallon, only intended to make 1 gallon but got carried away picking nettles. Also added raisins and juice of 3 lemons. Today I am going to try Grape and Peach juice wine from a carton, did this last year and turned out nice, cheap too

  • Well done, Irish moss is good if your wine is being really stubborn. My plum wine refused to clear, so I ended up bottling it, and its cleared nicely now :( May rebottle it as the sediment is not good for it to sit on. Some wines just want extra time


    I sometimes leave mine in the demijon for months just re-racking off the sediment, I only bottle mine if putting in a competition or giving it to someone, otherwise i leave it in bulk, it usually smoothes out better. Ive kept a bottle of my first brew i made in this house it's now 33 years old but never going to open that one.

  • I made some elderberry wine a few years back. I was told to chop up a couple of handfuls of raisins and put them in to ferment as well. It worked really well and came outlike a port type wine - drinkable almost straight away. Didin't have the leave it to let the tanins mature.


    Mind you I tried some grape and rhubarb wine and for some reason it wouldn't stop fermenting. Everytime I thought it ready to bottle it started bubbling again??? It was bloody strong and tasted crap to begin with. I had about 20 bottles so i stuck them in a cupboard and forgot about it. 5 years later, I found them out and it had turning into a drinkable sherry tasting wine - hellish stong and a kick like a mule though!


    For easy drinks making, I make blackberry or raspberry vodka liqueur. 1 cheap bottle of vodka, a pile of fruit and some sugar. Fill 2 bottles with layers of fruit and sugar. When just over 3/4 full of fruit/sugar top it up with vodka - leaving some air space at the top for topping up with more sugar. Shake the bottles daily to dissolve the sugar and get the fruit juice out. Once the sugar's dissolved, add some more, shake and repeat over a 3-6 month period. once it won't take any more sugar it's ready. I make this as soon as the blackberries are ripening and it's ready for a christmas drink.


    You might need to hook a few blackberries out with a skewer of something to make more room for the sugar as you go. Eventually you end up with a fruit liqueur. Strain it off, rebottle the fruit vodka to use and then cook up the alcoholic blackberries in a lovely apple/blackberry crumble. Mmmmmmm

  • We made plum wine in 2012 and rhubarb wine in 2011 last year and would like to try gorse wine/champagne.


    My husband heard something about it and seemingly it is lovely. We have loads of gorse around our way and I'd love to try and make it.


    Has anyone tried it and if so was it really that good and please could you share the recipe.

  • I haven't found a receipe for gorse wine, but I fancy trying to make Silver birch wine made from birch sap. I've had it before and it was lovely.


    Choose your tree carefully, Silver Birch or Downy Birch are good, choose a large one at least 25cm diameter. You will need a large clean bottle or demijohn, some 10mm plastic tubing and a 10mm drill bit and drill. Find a tree that has smooth bark about 1m up from the base and a good place to put your sap container. The sap rises in the layer just behind the bark so a hole 2cm deep in to the tree is perfect. Put one end of the tubing into the tree and the other in the bottle filling the gap with a clean rag to stop any bits falling in.
    Sometimes you can get a gallon of sap overnight, but sap doesn’t keep well so we advise you to freeze it if you do not have enough after 2 days. Don’t take more than one gallon per tree and when you have your sap, fill the hole with a piece of wood that has been shaped to fit. Sap can be drunk as a nutritious spring tonic, made in to a lovely country wine or boiled down to make a syrup. Of course once you have a wine or a syrup this can be an interesting ingredient for other dishes. Birch sap wine was introduced to Britain from the Baltic and is still made on a small scale in Scotland, as well as by Lurgashall Winery in Sussex. It can taste almost like mead, and does have a slight smell of honey.”


    Ingredients

    • 1 Gallon of Birch sap
    • 2 1/2 lbs Sugar
    • Zest of 2 Lemons
    • 1/2 lb Raisins
    • 1 tsp Brewers yeast.
    • You can also add 1tsp of yeast nutrient which does help the whole thing along but is not vital.


    Method Boil the sap with the lemon zest for 20 minutes. Poor into a clean bucket containing the sugar and raisins and stir until all sugar is dissolved. When the liquor has cooled to 70 degrees F (21 degrees C) add the yeast and yeast nutrient. Cover with a cloth and leave in a warm place (65-70 degrees F) for 4-5 days stirring daily.


    Strain into a demijohn fit an airlock and leave in a warm place until fermentation has finished (approx 10 days). Bottle the wine using siphon tubing taking care not to suck up the sediment in the bottom of the demijohn. Cork the bottles and keep for 3 months before drinking.


  • My husband heard something about it and seemingly it is lovely. We have loads of gorse around our way and I'd love to try and make it.


    Has anyone tried it and if so was it really that good and please could you share the recipe.



    Found this in an old wine making book I have on the shelf, the book dates from 1954 :


    Broom or Gorse wine:


    1 Gallon broom or gorse flowers 1 gallon water
    4 lb sugar 2 oranges
    2 Lemons yeast


    Place the flowers in a bag, (I'm guessing a clean pillowcase will do!) drop into the water and simmer gently for 15 minutes, adding more water if necessary.
    Take out the bag, squeeze as hard as possible into the water, dissolve the sugar in the liquid add the juice and rinds (no pith) of the oranges and lemons, allow to cool (to 21 degrees), add the yeast and ferment etc as with other wines.