Depression, Anxiety and SSRIs

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  • Or point me in the direction of some books........I prefer books anyway :)

    Do you have a Kindle?


    There's an excellent book called "Natural Eating" by Geoff Bond, but it's an absolute fortune nowadays - if you can find a cheap copy then snap it up, but the Kindle edition is far far cheaper. It's not specifically geared at any particular illness, but it explains the science brilliantly.


    Bear in mind that I'm an ex drug addict (25 years clean) and grew up with chronic asthma to a single mother who fed me jam sandwiches and chips 'cos that's all she could afford. I eliminated my asthma through diet over 15 years ago, and although I haven't always been strict (sometimes totally off track) I'm in bloody great shape for my age.


    I've also had major periods of depression ... one lasting a hell of along time after I lost my grandad and found out my ex had been cheating on me - so I do know what it's like to feel backed into a corner. I've never medicated myself, even when I was ready to slit my own wrists - instead hanging on for dear life until I found a more spiritual and holistic approach ... diet, exercise, meditation and self-hypnosis etc. (I've posted all this before anyway).


    Anyway, I'll hunt out some other stuff for you :)

  • Although this video isn't about depression, it's from a woman (a doctor) who eliminated her multiple sclerosis by changing her diet (and MS does affect the brain) ... it shows just how powerful good nutrition can be on healing neuro transmitters and our other cellular machinery.


  • Well I've never met anyone using antidepressants who is happy, content, passionate, ambitious, stable, with a sense of belonging and fulfilment and also full of energy.

    you haven't met me :) I know antidepressants aren't for everyone but for some of us they are.I do agree that a lot of people would be better without them but they do also do some good. Many people could benefit from using them in the short term as a crutch whilst sorting out their life. Other people need them to exist. I know I do. I don't want to go on depth into mine or anyone's situation but I do think that everyone is different and long term use isn't always bad. It's not that black and white.

  • Other people need them to exist. I know I do.

    That I will disagree with, regardless of whether I know you or not.


    You believe you need them, and at the moment you undoubtedly do, but that doesn't mean you have to remain dependent on them for the whole of your life. I needed my asthma drugs, and now I don't ... but I couldn't have just dumped them and ran down the street announcing my cure to the world ... it took dedication and effort!


    And while I agree that everyone is different, there are still basics physiological aspects that remain consistent throughout the whole species. We're all different, but we're not so different that certain rules don't apply to us.

  • That I will disagree with, regardless of whether I know you or not.


    You believe you need them, and at the moment you undoubtedly do, but that doesn't mean you have to remain dependent on them for the whole of your life. I needed my asthma drugs, and now I don't ... but I couldn't have just dumped them and ran down the street announcing my cure to the world ... it took dedication and effort!


    We'll have to agree to disagree then :)
    I respect everyone else's right to an opinion but I know a lot more about my own personal mental health than anyone else.


    I do agree with a lot of what you say, just not all of it.

  • Ultimately people have a choice who they listen to.


    They can listen to people singing the praises of medication and saying how wonderful their lives are since doing it, they can listen to the people like me who are happy without it, who have overcome their issues without the need to medicate. Or, they can use both approaches and work towards a happy medium.


    It's only fair that people get informed choices rather than taking the opinions from just one side.

  • Everyone's been so informative, I don't know where to start in responding to you all.


    For those of you who have been on antidepressants, how long did it take for you to feel the difference on them? Do you have any side effects at all? How are you different when you're on them, to when you're off them? Is the difference dramatic?


    I've been thinking hard about it all, and I know there are plenty of other things I should be doing to try and turn things around. It's not surprising that I'm depressed, but most of the reasons for my depression, I can work on and turn around, such as making some extreme changes to my current situation.


    I feel stressed and overwhelmed to the point where I barely eat, and when I do force myself to have something, it's a struggle, which is obviously having an impact on my mood because if I'm not giving my body any food, I'm bound to be feeling low and fatigued all the time. I used to be a really healthy eater, but lately I've just been surviving on the occasional cheese sandwich or bowl of porridge at the end of the day when I realize it's been yet another day when I've hardly consumed anything at all. So I don't know how I can expect to be feeling upbeat and happy-go-lucky about things, really, no wonder I feel like shit :rolleyes:.


    I've suffered with ME since I was a teenager, and I've had it ten years now. I don't know if there's any truth in the 'adrenal fatigue' theory, but my ME is significantly better than it ever was.


    I'm still considering the tablets, but perhaps it's a better idea for me to collect the prescription and keep it in a drawer somewhere and only take them if things get worse. I want to have a go without the tablets for a bit longer, I feel that maybe if I'm asking the question, "do I really need these tablets?" then I'm not bad enough to really require them, because if I really required them, I'd be begging for them, surely?


    Thanks again for all your replies.

  • I feel that maybe if I'm asking the question, "do I really need these tablets?" then I'm not bad enough to really require them, because if I really required them, I'd be begging for them, surely?

    That would be my view. It seems that you don't really want to take them, you don't need to take them, and you still have enough strength to pursue other alternatives.

  • Have you read this book? http://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/pro…0&creativeASIN=0861716264


    If not, I can recommend it. It really helps get your head round being chronically ill. I read it recently and although I've been I'll for a long time i foud it beneficial.


    Given what you've just posted I would think that making the effort to eat properly and look after yourself would be a lot more beneficial. Anti-depressants take a while to work and it may take time to find the right one for you so it wouldn't be a quick fix.

  • Have you read this book? http://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/pro…0&creativeASIN=0861716264


    If not, I can recommend it. It really helps get your head round being chronically ill. I read it recently and although I've been I'll for a long time i foud it beneficial.


    Thanks for the link :), I've never really liked to consider myself as being 'chronically ill' and I think perhaps I push the ME under the carpet a little bit. I'll definitely have a nose at that book, thanks.

  • What I would personally suggest is to avoid defining yourself as chronically ill ... because of the danger of it defining you. So many people focus on things that are wrong with them - try giving attention to the things that are right and good about you!


    It's like we train our minds into believing stuff about ourselves, and it's not always beneficial.


    Now I know it isn't easy when you're in the thick of it, but I do believe it's worth training yourself to focus as much on the positive things about yourself as you can - take time to find stuff to appreciate even if it doesn't feel like much. I really believe that you become and get what you think about most!

  • :hug:im in the same place as u right now so i do know how u feel:rolleyes:, i was on paroxitine, years ago & it didnt work for me, i went on prozac [which i think is fluxotine] about 2 years go, it was great to start with, i would recommend it for short term only but i found after a while it wasnt working, i was told by one doctor to have a higher dose & be on it for several years, but i decided not to do that, its a difficult one can i put up with depression? can i ride it out? should i be suppressing it with anti d's? can i put up with having half a personality while on them?
    I suppose its just a case of trying different things out & seeing how u get on with it you can always come off them [gradually] if they dont suit u & then see what else can be done but i do know & understand that depression is a difficult bastard to get rid of:(:rolleyes:


    good luck mate xx

  • erm sorry i know this is off topic but who am i talking to is it Elfie or Madcat? im confused


    I'm the original poster, so I assume your reply was aimed at me? If it was, thanks for all the info, it's interesting that you were on Prozac and decided to come off it.. I'm under a load of pressure from my family to give Prozac a try, I think they think it's going to be some sort of wonder-drug which is going to sort me out and enable me to 'get a grip' :S.


    I have another appointment with the doctor next week, I might discuss things further then. Thanks for your support, trippy. Everyone on the forum has been really helpful.

  • What I would personally suggest is to avoid defining yourself as chronically ill ... because of the danger of it defining you. So many people focus on things that are wrong with them - try giving attention to the things that are right and good about you!


    It's like we train our minds into believing stuff about ourselves, and it's not always beneficial.


    Now I know it isn't easy when you're in the thick of it, but I do believe it's worth training yourself to focus as much on the positive things about yourself as you can - take time to find stuff to appreciate even if it doesn't feel like much. I really believe that you become and get what you think about most!


    I would also really recommend this - it helped me no end. I was about to get started on it here but was really tired & went to bed!:


    Quote from Pantheist

    Writing things down tends to help me, keeping a bit of a log of my state, what I'm eating, my thoughts & concerns, my plans. I did have some other points and this is all a bit of a jumble, but I'm tired & off to bed. Sorry for the mess, but I hope some of this stuff helps you & I'm more than happy to share with you whatever else comes to mind. All the best x


    I believe it's really important to occasionally list things you have achieved, however small, and take time to reflect over & appreciate it. Even if it's small things because you're struggling, it's all relative. In my depressed state I found at first I would dismiss the positives with negatives 'ok I did that, but I should be doing so much more' etc. You beat yourself up, think you're letting others & yourself down, & focus on the fact you're a mess. But then you start to realise how negativity has got a grip on you and can start to challenge these thoughts.


    You sure as hell aren't going to get out of a depressed state if you're putting yourself down all the time. I'm sure there is no 'one cure for all', but I am giving my account & hoping you can perhaps relate and learn from it. Everyone deserves to be happy, and if you find yourself not letting you be happy over simple things then you really need to tackle it. It wasn't long after I started challenging the negative things that I felt a big step forward and finally a sense of happiness, where I could truthfully think 'yes, I have eaten a good variety of vegetables today'. 'Yes, I have finally filed away that stupid paperwork I have been putting off for so long... it was easy, why have I been avoiding it?!'.


    If you have trouble eating, reduce the portions you eat & try to have little nibbles continually throughout the day. If you have some humous with carrots to dip for example, this isn't a lot of work but it's healthy. Don't make eating a chore if you can help it, unless you enjoy the act of preparing & cooking food. Personally I found it difficult to eat, but that was because I was hiding away from it. When I got on with cooking, I actually found I enjoyed the process & my consumption naturally picked up.


    Maybe you're different, but I always find salad goes down the hatch easily. I mentioned earlier that veg can help produce seratonin, try munching leafy greens X

  • What I would personally suggest is to avoid defining yourself as chronically ill ... because of the danger of it defining you. So many people focus on things that are wrong with them - try giving attention to the things that are right and good about you!


    It's like we train our minds into believing stuff about ourselves, and it's not always beneficial.


    I would also agree with this. When I was depressed I used to spend an awful lot of time on a Social Anxiety support forum. It was helpful at first because I learned that I was not a complete freak, and that there are an awful lot of people in the world with almost the exact same thought and behaviour patterns as me. But I dwelt on it, and it became all I could think about. I let it define me. In the end I had to leave, because there was no way for positive thinking to flourish when focusing on the negatives all the time. It was the only way to move forward.


    In my case the side effects of SSRIs (citalopram) made me worse. I felt numbed, anxious, physically weak, and exhausted from no sleep because of the unrelenting insomnia that came with it. I don't feel anti depressants were the right treatment for me. No one listened to the reasons I was feeling that way, and I had no treatment to help the cause. I don't believe I'll ever go near them again.


    I'm sorry you're feeling like this Elfie. I hope you find something that works for you soon. xxxxx :hug:

  • Can I just say that the suggestion about the book about being chronically ill was in regard to M.E. not depression. I don't think there is harm in admitting that you have a chronic illness as long as you don't let it define you. The book is about not letting the illness stop you from living a life and being happy. It's very good for people who have physical health problems who want to take control and not let those physical problems turn into mental health problems.

  • I'm the original poster, so I assume your reply was aimed at me? If it was, thanks for all the info, it's interesting that you were on Prozac and decided to come off it.. I'm under a load of pressure from my family to give Prozac a try, I think they think it's going to be some sort of wonder-drug which is going to sort me out and enable me to 'get a grip' :S.


    I have another appointment with the doctor next week, I might discuss things further then. Thanks for your support, trippy. Everyone on the forum has been really helpful.


    sorry i should of added your quote in but yes my reply was to u
    i hope both yourself & madcat get some help in what ever shape or form, im finding what i eat & not eat can be helpful, look into your diet xx

  • These 20 tips seem to be pretty much on the money


    This sort of stuff has helped me immensly, I suffered from terrible stomach pains / IBS. My stomach is so much better these days, though I'm still off the caffeine and alcohol... I occasionally eat cheese-cake, chocolate & stuff... it's too good! But yeah, my stomach can even handle refined sugars a little now. Before it would just wreck me. I'm so happy that my anxiety & stuff is drifting away and my life is returning to me.

  • It all depends on what your original self is like I think.


    I've certainly got something wrong with my wiring, finally decided to go for CBT, but opted for meds for extra help while I wait (I'm preeeeeeeetty bi-polar, but I've gotten to 27 without any help/mis diagnosed and it's ruined my life). I was on Citalopram for three months before it started waring off. I've been on Prozac (Fluxotine) for a month and it feels like I'm not on anything. My behaviour has reverted back to it's self and I'm receiving all the massively negative implications I had before my decision to get help.


    I say assess what you are like as a person (ie: how you react to things and whatnot). If you're pretty sound/normal then I'm guessing any SSRI will work fine and you will be ok in a few months (also remember Prozac is mainly flouride). Get your doctor to talk through how each SSRI works and suggest the applicable. Also read up online.


    I'm only posting this as I can see me on a bit of a merry-go-round in regards to medications.... but I wouldn't suggest taking them if you really don't need to. Take a break, excersize, eat healthily - these should all help us anyways.


    Docs wouldn't hand these out so freely if they didn't dumb us down.

  • Docs wouldn't hand these out so freely if they didn't dumb us down.

    I don't think that's fair at all. Doctors have a parade of desperate people coming to their surgeries. They have very limited options given the lack of resources for effective counselling. What else are they gonna do when people are at the end of their tether pleading for help?

  • Don't get me wrong - I didn't mean it be malicious.... I meant it more for examples like over exaggerating teens (yes, there are exceptions), or people that can't cope with smallest of things.


    I swear they've just been chucking pellets at everyone for everything. It's more of a blanket case of shutting everybody up as people (like myself) would have been given a different treatment route if handing out free tablets wasn't so easy. Most of the people I know are on the same medication for completely different things.


    IMO, it's just easier for them and less hassle on the system.

  • The GPs at my local surgery are really reluctant to prescribe meds if they don't feel that people really need them. Hell, my own GP even suggested St. John's Wort to a friend of mine. Another GP at the surgery prescribes homeopathic remedies.


    I'm sure some GPs hand out pills like smarties, but I'd be wary of making generalisations.