Why are you vegetarian ?

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  • Just wondering why people became vegetarian. I am a veggie myself, it started because of my Buddhist beliefs, and as my understanding and view of life developed I have became really passionate about animal welfare. Also it would be nice to hear from any non vegetarians, what they think, why they don't want to become a veggie and so on. Any comments would be appreciated.



    Cheers :D

  • Because it's unsustainable.
    Because people die of starvation every day in third world countries when it could be avoided.
    Because I can't handle the level of cruelty that we inflict on animals that are bred for consumption.


    I shoot it= I eat it. Because I'm not in a position to shoot and eat, I refrain from eating it.
    Simples.

  • i became a veggie about 30 years ago and have never looked back. I became a veggie because we don't need meat to survive so taking a life to enjoy a taste is wrong in my eyes. Just my thoughts tho

  • How is it unsustainable?
    I became fully veggie primarily because of my lack of kitchen hygiene making meat products unsafe :p But I rarely ate meat prior to that due to not liking the taste/smell or texture of flesh.Eating animals,or bits of animals,to me is yuk and 'unnatural' (though its not of course),animal cruelty is obviously wrong but the actual death of an animal part I dont have a problem with,everything dies and the worlds full of animals eating each other.

  • A few reasons.


    Because I don't want to kill creatures unnecessarily, and don't feel I can escape that by having others do so instead.


    Also cos I think (despite what the gorgeous George Monbiot says) that meat production is pants for the environment. I hate what the vast majority of farmers have done, and continue to do, to the countryside. There's hardly any real countryside left, just bloody farmland. It takes up so much more land space to produce meat than it does other food. One person not eating meat is just a drop in the ocean obviously, but the ocean's made up of drops.


    And not least because I'm a fat bastard who loves me food, and would be like the side of a house for sure if I ate meat.

  • Like you, Zidangus, I became vegetarian due to my Buddhist beliefs. As others have said, if it is not necessary to eat meat to be healthy, then it is not justifiable to cause avoidable suffering.

  • Sorry,still dont understand,the comparison with crop growing doesnt make sense and we've been rearing animals for meat since forever so I dont see why its any more unsustainable than anything else thats due to increased numbers of humans on the planet.



    It's no more unsustainable than a lot of things on the planet-but that doesn't make that right either. We have been rearing for meat for a long time, you're right. But the production was on a lot smaller scale. Companies over-produce in order to compensate for "possible" requirement. So yeah, it's pretty unsustainable if they produce more meat than is necessary just in case. The point is, it's one of my reasons for not being vegetarian. Similar to the reason I choose to recycle, buy second hand goods, etc. But I believe we're digressing here...

  • Because although I've met farmers who care about their animals and make an effort to improve their land and environment I know just as many who are utter nobs who have no respect for the animals in their care (kicking the cow because it doesn't move fast enough to be milked for example) and would cut down a hedge without a second's thought for an extra 6 square feet of grazing.


    Because I've seen the ecological degradation that's the result from excessive stock levels and poor rural management.


    Because I have no control over how the animal dies, I don't know how it's lived, how far it's been transported, the amount of stress it's suffered prior to death or how quickly it's died.


    I don't have a problem with an animal dying so I can eat it but if I'm to be responsible for the death of another living thing then that responsibility should be direct - not three steps removed. It's too easy to become disassociated with the source of your food when it's just a plastic shrink-wrapped lump in the chiller section of your local supermarket :shrug:



    Because it's unsustainable.


    I would think it's more the current levels of consumption combined with increasing population that's unsustainable rather than meat-eating in general terms. Grazing animals at appropriate levels in regions where crop growing is unfeasible (e.g. parts of sub-Saharan africa, chunks of Asia, mid-Wales :p) is fine, but the key words are "grazing" (so no artificial feed) and "appropriate level", you're not going to support current levels of meat consumption using that as a rule of production. You've got to work with the ecosystem.


    Quote

    Because people die of starvation every day in third world countries when it could be avoided.


    I expect such situations could only really be avoided if you remove corrupt individuals from power, change the whole way the global economy works and guarantee that aid is actually spent on food etc and not arms. Meat consumption isn't causing people in third world countries to starves, it's the whole fucked up mess of priorities.

  • I would think it's more the current levels of consumption combined with increasing population that's unsustainable rather than meat-eating in general terms. Grazing animals at appropriate levels in regions where crop growing is unfeasible (e.g. parts of sub-Saharan africa, chunks of Asia, mid-Wales :p) is fine, but the key word is appropriate, you're not going to support current levels of meat consumption using that as a rule of production.


    I expect such situations could only really be avoided if you remove corrupt individuals from power, change the whole way the global economy works and guarantee that aid is actually spent on food etc and not arms. Meat consumption isn't causing people in third world countries to starves, it's the whole fucked up mess of priorities.


    Well that's just it, isn't it. The majority of the land used for grazing could easily be used to grow crops, which is why I have an aversion to the consumption of meat. No, it wouldn't solve all problems overnight, and yes, while ever purchasing arms is more of a priority than food to the various governments of the world, people will continue to starve. But I do what I can, little old me ;) and I can stop eating meat. Because like Tordisa says: "The ocean is made of drops" :)

  • Some lowland sites in the UK (I could apply it further afield but not sure on how accurate I'd be) which are grazed by cattle (or what have you) that could be converted to food crops would be ecologically less diverse if that were to happen (higher species diversity of grassland compared to monoculture of potatoes :p). It depends on the management.


    Then take into account pesticides, fertilisers and other modern farming practices which are used for crop production - damaging all the way, because most people don't eat organic. The only organic thing I buy regularly is milk and cheese for the husband and sproglett because I can't afford the cost otherwise (oh and bananas, the bananas are always organic fairtrade), unfortunately I think more people view it that way than not.


    In terms of "sustainability" of people and the environment long term, I don't think it makes a blind bit of difference what your dietary choice is.


    Yeah, I'm all about positivity this evening :p :rolleyes:


  • :suicide:


    ;)

  • Because although I've met farmers who care about their animals and make an effort to improve their land and environment I know just as many who are utter nobs who have no respect for the animals in their care (kicking the cow because it doesn't move fast enough to be milked for example) and would cut down a hedge without a second's thought for an extra 6 square feet of grazing.


    This is what I do not like about some farmers also. I mean a lot of farmers like to see themself as keepers of the countryside but a lot of them aren't even bothered about their own animals welfare never mind the wildlife. It does seem that a lot of them only care about their own profit. For example any animal that has a negative affect on their profit such as a fox, are instantly called vermin and need to be culled :( Just look at the badger situation in the UK. Even worse are these american style corporate mega farms, who have no shame in putting profit above animal welfare. The saddest part of all is that the politicians let them get on with it, and in some cases support it (badgers cull) without a care in the world about the animals involved.

  • :suicide:


    ;)



    :D


    ... It does seem that a lot of them only care about their own profit. For example any animal that has a negative affect on their profit such as a fox, are instantly called vermin and need to be culled :( Just look at the badger situation in the UK. Even worse are these american style corporate mega farms, who have no shame in putting profit above animal welfare.


    I can sort of see it both ways tbh. Particularly if you're only a small farm (those US megafarms aren't farms, they're just factories :mad:) and it's your livelihood, it starts to be less about profit and more about whether you've got enough to pay the bills. I'm thinking in terms of people like my grandparents though (and my landlord), until about 15 years ago my grandparents had a small flock of sheep on about 20acres (well, 11acres "good grazing", 9acres moorland). Losing a lamb to a fox was a big deal - my gran didn't like foxes, but then she liked the fox "hunters" even less (the red coats and tally ho sort) :shrug:


    The badger issue is a big bugbear of mine, particularly as I'm living on the edge of the Welsh cull zone and a cull is going to have wildlife implications on a much broader scale that they don't really give a flying fuck about. Half the Welsh Assembly are farmers anyway (*disclaimer* I may possibly be exaggerating, I don't have numbers to hand :p). However, I may have some guilt associations seeing as I was part of a badger survey team down here a few years back (but that was when WAG was still saying they weren't going to cull so I'm not completely overwhelmed with guilt ;) ).

  • My vegetarianism was initially about production techniques than any objection to the actual eating of meat - and it was far easier to have a blanket ban than to continually fuss about the source of the meat.


    Nowadays it's more that I have the choice not to eat dead animals - I don't necessarily believe that all life is sacred, so if I was in a survival situation, or living in a more natural environment my attitude would probably be very different.


    I've also noticed health improvements - for instance, I used to get indigestion a lot and since I went veggie I've probably had it 4 times in the last 7 years.

  • For me it's not about animals dying but about how they live while they're being bred for our consumption. I can't deal with factory farming, and, although by that principle, I should be prepared to eat organic free-range meat, I've found that I have no desire to, although I've tried bits on occasion.

  • I've reduced the amount of meat I eat drastically over the last few months. I disagree with the way most meat is produced, so have been limiting myself to organic or free range, which means I can rarely afford to eat it anyway. Most of my meals are vegetarian these days, and I'm coping perfectally well, which I never thought I would! I think I could probably make the jump to vegetarian now, with the exception of food I've caught myself (like fish and shellfish, which I very rarely catch for myself now anyway).

  • I don't eat meat because I don't like killing things and think if your not going to do it yourself,don't expect someone else to.I often think of people that work in abattoirs as ......jeez. words defy me. what a terrible,terrible job.

  • I became vegetarian after watching 'The Animal Film' on Channel 4, gawd knows how long ago.
    I've been veg or vegan about half my life - off and on.
    I'm not at the moment - have meat/fish maybe once a fortnight or so.

  • I do eat red and poultry meat occasionally though I have cut down to once a week at most. I still eat fish regularly though not as mch as i used to eat meat. The reason I cut back was mainly that as a society and myself at that time eat too much meat and ther is no need to kill so many creatures or for their mistreatment.
    I also considered health reasons for not eating so much meat. Although it's a natural part of our diet in moderation eating too much is unatural and therefore bad for me.

    Through violence you may solve one problem, but you will sow the seeds for another...

  • I became vegetarian because I felt it was a contradiction to love animals and eat them. I felt like I was turning a blind eye to where meat actually came from and how it got to my plate. That was 8 years ago and obviously, since then, I've learnt a lot and picked up many more good reasons to be vegetarian/vegan. Such as; the treatment and conditions of animals reared for food/milk/eggs etc., the environmental issues (e.g. waste produced by livestock, overfishing), inefficient energy transfer (transfer from soya to meat etc.), unsustainability (the waste produced by large scale fishing). Most of all it is the fact that we cannot compare ourselves to other species that hunt and kill for food. We have a conscience and we are not killing to survive (the vast majority of us aren't anyway).

  • With me it was because I don't like the way the majority of animals are treated before being killed, so if I could have only had organic meat or meat that I had shot/fish I had caught after they had been living free I would have, but I can't shoot, don't fish and 20 years ago organic meat was hard to come by and very expensive, so I went veggie.

    It really annoys me when meat eaters don't like the idea of their food looking like an animal, or hate seeing animals being skinned or raw. Those people don't want to know what they are really eating it seems, and would prefer it all to be nuugget or burger shaped so they don't feel guilty. I don't mind if people want to eat meat, but at least they need to appreciate the fact that they are eating animals.

  • I know what you mean. I hate knowing what goes on to get our milk and eggs, and even though I get organic free range eggs, I know not all are as good as you think they are, plus what about the boy chicks, and then as for cows....

  • My last spout of veganism lasted a year. I have pretty much decided that I won't try it again, in the near future anyway. Sadly, there are just some things I can't give up completely. I give myself credit that I am doing what I can, which includes some vegan ways (soya milk instead of cows milk, soya yoghurts and margarine, etc.), and I will always have the morals of a vegan. Animals involved with the dairy and egg industries are treat worse imo.

  • When I was five years old, I was starting to learn where food comes from. I did a lot of thinking about this, and one day I was in the livingroom, and there was bullfighting on the TV. I stated right there and then that I didn't want to eat meat because it was cruel to animals. I've been veggie since! Over the years I've found many more good reasons for being veggie, but everyone is always surprised that I made a choice like that at five years old. My mum says I was a bright cookie! lol :)