Handing in your notice - without a job to go to?

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  • In todays workforce crisis - is this a good idea? Would you do it yourself or recommend a friend to do so?

    Is it worth the gamble or is it better to be earning an income while being miserable in your place of employment?

    Thoughts please.

  • I've done it hun.. 4 years ago...the job i was in was an ok salary but the levels of responsibility i had and what was expected of me weren't reflected in my salary and i knew there would be no change in that.. so i quit...i had a few months of sittin on a sunny field making jewellery with starkatkel and then i got myself a little job workin in a cafe one day a week... i had downsized massively aswell from a big three bedroom house on private rent to a static caravan so could still manage to cover my outgoings without actually having to work.. it was a positive decision and i am really glad i made it... on my cv thats when i took a small career break to follow more creative-driven ways of making money lol ;)

  • will just add i wouldn't have done it unless i had known my outgoings were manageable on the money i already had coming in or if i was at all bothered about staying within that career area... i dunno in your situation whether it would be more sensible to have a little part-time job lined up so that you can still cover your outgoings ? goodluck whatever you decide xxxxx

  • Just done it, best feeling in the wooooooooorlllld, I finish being a corporate whore (even though I work for a charity) at the end of October, I have no job (in the conventional sense) to go to. I'm going self employed, selling bits or orgonite on the web. Picking up little bits of seasonal labour as I go, I have a winter park up with leccie and wood in exchange for some wood clearance/gardening.
    My maxim has always been when its time to go-go. If your compromising your principles or happiness for a wage then its time to go, if your giving less than a 100% its time to go, if your waking up dreading going to work its time to go, I've left jobs when it gets to that stage, I have even walked out of interviews when I'm getting a bad feeling..... Don't believe the media lies, there are jobs out there and if you have a decent CV, a good standard of education/experience and throw enough apps out, another job will come quickly. I don't know whether this is a question you are asking for yourself or a friend, but my advice is to do what you know you need to do. Tomorrows not promised and slogging on in a job which is unrewarding is evil, I'm a firm advocate of stepping out and letting new possibilities into your current situation. How about volunteering, commune/community life, or trying something right outside the box..
    Be blessed and I hope it pans out.....:D

  • T'would be a reckless thing to do in today's job market, unless you "fit the bill and then some" for the job you are going to.....and it is undersubscribed. Beyond that, most jobs today are not joyful experiences; chasing a job that will make you happy will in most cases get you nowhere, fast....so you either need to find a way to be happy in the job you have, or look closely at what is wrong currently rather than just leap out at any passing alternative.

    "The only rules that really matter are these: what a man can do and what a man can't do."

    The post was edited 2 times, last by Coyote ().

  • Daz did it to move here in March and hasn't been able to find a job. He applies for so many and never hears back. Thankfully the company he used to work for has taken him back freelance so he works for them from home. We'd be totally screwed otherwise.

  • Thanks, its a hard one I know, but I feel that Disciple has knocked it on the head - one can not give a 100 percent when one is so unhappy and in my line of work that can have terrible results for others. I am worried about the future of where I work and I come here each day and can not wait for it to be over.

    I have saved a few grand to tie me over - it's just the responisble side of me keeps moving in so to speak.

  • If you have enough money to see you through at least 6 months, you could probably get away with it if you have a 6 month holiday. If on the other hand you don't you will be buggered when it comes to claiming JSA. Because you have intentionally left your job, when you claim JSA they will more than likely sanction you for 6 months. So when you claim JSA you won't get any money, but you will still have to go down the jobcentre every two weeks. The worst thing is that the sanction would go on your record and if you end up signing off after 3 months because you have found a job and the job goes tits up, then you would find that you will still have 3 months of the sanction previously to serve.


    Personally I would only quit a job if I knew where I was going next and had either a confirmed university place or a job offer.

  • I handed in my noice for a job in January 2008 and did not have another one until October 2009. I thought it would be easy to get a job but it wasn't.

    You shut your mouth. How can you say I go about things the wrong way? I am human and I need to be loved just like everybody else does

  • If you have enough money to see you through at least 6 months, you could probably get away with it if you have a 6 month holiday. If on the other hand you don't you will be buggered when it comes to claiming JSA. Because you have intentionally left your job, when you claim JSA they will more than likely sanction you for 6 months. So when you claim JSA you won't get any money, but you will still have to go down the jobcentre every two weeks. The worst thing is that the sanction would go on your record and if you end up signing off after 3 months because you have found a job and the job goes tits up, then you would find that you will still have 3 months of the sanction previously to serve.


    Personally I would only quit a job if I knew where I was going next and had either a confirmed university place or a job offer.



    I thought it was you can't claim JSA for 13 weeks (or something like that) if you intentionally left your job?

  • If you have a reason for quitting a job like stress etc then you can claim JSA straight away, otherwise you have to wait 6 or 12 weeks I can't remember.

  • I have every reason to quit in my eyes, the future there is not certain and I reckon its only a matter of time before about 2000 of us are made jobless. Plus I I go and I come home and I want to cry.

    Hannah - I have to idea's I keep coming back to - starting my own shop ior youth mental health work. One would eat every saving and more I have but would be an adventure. The other a gamble as again cuts are being made in this field.

  • i dont think people should spend their whole lives being miserable just to pay bills but i dont think u should quit with nothing to go into. why dont u look properly into those other things but keep your job (as shit as it is) for the time being, for your own security?

  • For my time in service about 2 and a half grand I worked out. Thing is people are quitting and in higher postions and with out a job to go to. the way I see it - they know sometime I dont. Just I am getting such itchy feet and I sort of think - take a gamble and see what happens, then my grown up head says no.

    I really dispise it there at the mo and it puts me in a bad mood every day I have to go and I am sure that is not good for me or anyone else for that matter.

    I am quite happy to work in a pub or shop until I find what I want with life. lol

  • I'm in a job i hate , i've had to shave my beard off and remove my earing . The job is not what i'm trained as but its local and pays and theres No Engineering jobs , I realy hate it and only just get through most days without falling out with someone but it's money and it keeps me going till things pick up (if ever they do ) and i can go back engineering . i think its better to be in a shit job getting some money than in No job getting no money

  • I'm in the same boat as you Joss, in a job I hate to pay off our debts and try to stay afloat. There are some days I feel physically sick at the thought of having to go, and there are many times I've cried over the breakfast table. I even ended up on anti depressants for over a year just so I could get through the door. Much better now, but it's still hard, particularly when I get shouted at by clients (an old lady called me a fucking bitch of a whore the other day, charming), but I have to go because there's no way we could afford to live on benefits with our outgoings.

    On the plus side, I have taken positive action recently and have decided to retrain, and have even been rewarded a small grant to cover costs. I start my Holistic Therapy training on Wednesday!!!! I still have to do the terrible job in the meantime, but at least I can look forward to a brighter future

  • In todays workforce crisis - is this a good idea? Would you do it yourself or recommend a friend to do so?

    Is it worth the gamble or is it better to be earning an income while being miserable in your place of employment?

    Thoughts please.



    depends how rich your partner is:pp:D



    suppose my simple answer is if you dont like it leave..unless having no money worries you more than your job does

  • My advice then, is to get a job in a pub or a shop, then quit.


    ditto what stu said...In this climate you need a job to go to...as the chances of you finding another one after a ' gap year ' may be pretty slim..So i'd suggest getting a part time job and that'll give you more free time to sort out where you want to go next regarding your career,life ,the universe and everything:)

  • What sector do you work in? I have worked in social housing/criminal justice for 8 years and have moved 7 times, sometimes to jobs and other times not. I have historically never had a problem finding work, with my longest spell out of work (by choice) being 4 months when we moved to Anglesey. I agree jobs are hard to come by, but certain sectors rely upon agency staff and if you can use a reputable one then work isn't unattainable.

  • I work in nursing / childrens mainly.

    I have just joined an agency which will give me part time work as a nanny on a day to day basis. So can earn pennies if I wish:)

    However I need a change or I will go insane I reckon x

  • What sector do you work in? I have worked in social housing/criminal justice for 8 years and have moved 7 times, sometimes to jobs and other times not. I have historically never had a problem finding work, with my longest spell out of work (by choice) being 4 months when we moved to Anglesey. I agree jobs are hard to come by, but certain sectors rely upon agency staff and if you can use a reputable one then work isn't unattainable.



    I think I would quite like this sort of work :D

  • Post by disciple ().

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  • I've enjoyed my time working in the sector, Its nice to be on the otherside of the fence these days, but I think every job has a shelf life...I don't self define through me job, and I'll quite happily do most things...I'm looking forward to doing a bit of manual labour again..I've had it upto me eyeballs of paperwork and bureacracy....If you fancy giving it a go, the organisation I work for has a vacancy in Ashford Kent....://http://www.jobisjob.co.uk/ashf…sf77dt6mjzx7xdxgp6imo3lep
    :)

  • In todays workforce crisis - is this a good idea? Would you do it yourself or recommend a friend to do so?

    Is it worth the gamble or is it better to be earning an income while being miserable in your place of employment?

    Thoughts please.


    It is, in my opinion, a very good idea if your current job is making you miserable and if you can survive financially (on benefit or whatever) until you get another job or find another way to make a living. That's two big 'if's though.


    I have done it myself, twice. It worked out fine both times. (By 'fine,' I mean I managed on very little money and was happy. Bear in mind though that certainly if I had stuck with my original career, I would be on three times the income I am on now. So, if you want a steady career, don't quit, change jobs instead.)


    I have recommended a friend to do so as well, and things worked out fine for her too (although, she's a nurse, so it was never going to be hard for her to find another job).


    It is worth the gamble in my opinion as if you're miserable at work, you're miserable for forty hours a week for the foreseeable future, and life is short.


    For what it's worth, here's what I did: check out the benefits situation very carefully, give yourself a definite period of time to look for a new job (so at least you know that there's light at the end of the tunnel), and then if you haven't found a job in the given time, and you can survive on benefit, say feck it and hand in your notice. Stress shortens your life and affects your health. Peace of mind is worth any amount of money.

  • I quit nursing after 20 years...just upped and left one day literally. I got half way into work and instead of taking the 3rd exit at the roundabout I continued on round and went home. I signed off sick and handed my notice in. I could not take the stress any more. Actually quitting took a lot but the relief afterwards was tremendous. All my health issues have all but vanished. I feel and look better.


    Would I recommend it? No, because I wouldnt want to get the blame if it all goes tits up! My opinion is that it was the right thing for me. I am now self employed, I am not as well off in monetary terms but much wealthier in life terms. I honestly believe I would have ended up quite seriously ill if I had continued in nursing, and after 20 years I was just burnt out.


    I was however, extremely broke for about 6-9 months, and you have to be prepared to deal with that as a possible consequence of quitting your job.