Social Care Work.....

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  • I was in the city yesterday, and there was an stand giving information about social care work.. I spoke to them for a while, and I am waiting for an information pack to be sent.

    Is there anyone on here which works in social care who has done in the past.. I think I know of 2 forumers who work in this industry.

    So is it a good job?? Any positives/negatives??? Any stories?? There seems to be loads of jobs going at present where I live all offering free training to get into the industry.

    I am allways looking into new things, and this does appeal to me...

    'You have not seen a real women, untill you have seen a beautifal hippy girl dancing bare foot in a field'

  • I'd be interested to see how it goes for you. I've been thinking about something like this for a while now too - I'm not sure if I can be doing with all the rules and regs, and I don't knwo if I fancy having to go back to studying for a degree! But the whole, helping young people/kids thing apeals to me. Good luck with it :)

  • I'd be interested to see how it goes for you. I've been thinking about something like this for a while now too - I'm not sure if I can be doing with all the rules and regs, and I don't knwo if I fancy having to go back to studying for a degree! But the whole, helping young people/kids thing apeals to me. Good luck with it :)



    social care work you dont need a degree because you can get on the job training...

    social work, you prob will need a degree......

    yeah going back to uni would put me off, i spent too many years in further eductaion already...

    'You have not seen a real women, untill you have seen a beautifal hippy girl dancing bare foot in a field'

    The post was edited 1 time, last by moonpup ().

  • You will more than likely get your qualifications on the job like I did. I have Nvq's in Heath and Social care. I work mainly with elderly or disabled people that wish to stay in their own homes. its an extremely rewarding job. Normally the companies you work for are the nightmare. But you'll get plenty of training etc to pop under your belt.

  • Oh right, that's even more interesting then! I must admit I only looked on that 'Be The Difference' site they advertise, and on there it seemed to be a degree or nothing so I didn't look any further :rolleyes:

  • Oh right, that's even more interesting then! I must admit I only looked on that 'Be The Difference' site they advertise, and on there it seemed to be a degree or nothing so I didn't look any further :rolleyes:



    Maybe that was for the social work aspect of it....

    Normally the companies you work for are the nightmare.



    How come??

    'You have not seen a real women, untill you have seen a beautifal hippy girl dancing bare foot in a field'

  • Just organisational skills etc.. Or they will tell you the odd fib to get you to cover a call when someone is off sick.. i.e It's only an hour call, but its really 2 hours. Or if your running late and you call the office to inform the client, they say they will.. but they don't. Just loads of things like that.

    Best thing is to search for care agencies in your area and give them a call. There is always work going. Fish about as some pay better than others and you will need a car. Unless you work in care homes / hospitals

  • Ooh thank you hun :D



    yeah good web site.. There is a section explaining the difference between social care and social work and the qualifications that are needed...

    cut and paste job :)

    Social workers need an honours degree to practise, as they are involved at a senior level with people who use social care services. Social workers are trained to deal with complex problems and will assess an individual's needs, offer support and advice and if necessary act as an advocate to put in place a package of care. Social care workers tend to offer more personal care, and in many cases do not require any qualifications when they start work, as they are offered on-the-job training.

    As social care workers progress with their careers they have the opportunity to gain qualifications, such as NVQs, which allow them to take on more and more responsibility. In some cases, qualifications and experience gained while working in social care entitle people to go on and study for a social work degree.

    'You have not seen a real women, untill you have seen a beautifal hippy girl dancing bare foot in a field'

  • i've now worked for over 6 years in this industry. i've looked after adults aged from 30's to 70's with varying degrees of learning disability (ie mentally handicapped, but it's not pc to say that anymore). on top of that some have had other conditions, such as down's syndrome, epilepsy, parkinson's disease, diabetes, scizophrenia, paranoia, depression, anxiety, incontinence, deafness, behavioural problems, personality disorders, communication difficulties, etc. i've looked after all male homes and mixed sex homes, of various sizes, in both care home and supported living environments.


    as you can probably imagine, with that sort of stuff going on, no two days are ever the same! that's partly why i like it of course. evey day brings a new challenge to keep you on your toes. can't say that about mundane office jobs i've had in the past.


    i also like it because the hours vary, you don't have to wear a shirt and tie (so not me!), you're on your feet most of the time not sat at a desk and of course because you are helping to improve the lives of some of the most unfortunate people in our society. i may not earn a hundred grand a week kicking a ball around and boffing other people's wives willy nilly, but i do like the fact that i'm helping people who can't often help themselves, to live as comfortable and dignified life as possible.


    don't get me wrong, a lot of the job can be pretty icky and, well, stuff you'd perhaps rather not have to deal with given the choice, but overall, if you can live with the poor wages, and have the right personality and temperament to do it, it can be a great job!


    the company i work for is one of the larger national organisations in the field of learning disability and they are very hot on training their staff and enforcing the highest standards of care. i've done an nvq 3 since i've been there. sometimes it can all seem like ott pc nonsense of course, but on balance i'd rather work for a company that cares enought about its people to want the best for them. it also helps that the company i work for is a registered charity, so i don't feel that i'm simply working to line some other bloke's pockets.


    it's vary rare that i wake up and dread going to work, and i've certainly had that feeling in other jobs i've done. :)

    The trouble with quotes on the internet is that you never know if they are genuine - Abraham Lincoln



  • don't get me wrong, a lot of the job can be pretty icky and, well, stuff you'd perhaps rather not have to deal with given the choice, but overall, if you can live with the poor wages, and have the right personality and temperament to do it, it can be a great job!



    yeah how do you cope with the ickyness or how did you cope when you first started.. that is one of apsect of the job I would be a bit worried about doing and one of the things that may hold me back.. nothing else.

    Wages are not to bad where I live, from what I have seen so far, can, but then again I am outdoor activity instructing at present, and that is badly payed....... still the pay varies from 6.50-9.00 quid an hour in brum for social care.

    I know what you mean about getting job satisfaction.. does like like a great job.

    'You have not seen a real women, untill you have seen a beautifal hippy girl dancing bare foot in a field'

    The post was edited 4 times, last by moonpup ().

  • yeah how do you cope with the ickyness or how did you cope when you first started.. that is one of apsect of the job I would be a bit worried about doing and one of the things that may hold me back.. nothing else.


    Not all care jobs are icky!!


    I used to work with vunerable teens in care homes. It was the last resort before they were locked up so they were quite a challenging bunch. Worth it though.

  • Re: Icky
    If you do work on the icky side at first its a bit urgh.. Then after a while its second nature. don't realised youa re doing icky stuff

    But not all jobs are icky like starpoi says.

    Also like Zee says, its very rare if at all that I wake up dreading work. I love my job and would never change it.

  • yeah how do you cope with the ickyness or how did you cope when you first started.. that is one of apsect of the job I would be a bit worried about doing and one of the things that may hold me back.. nothing else.


    well without getting into specifics, you've got to be willing to deal with every type of substance the body can produce. you've also got to be able to handle people who can be completely irrational and unpredictable. you have to accept that their 'reality' is different to yours and you have to accommodate theirs, not vice versa. you also have to learn not to take things personally, which can be very hard. the thing that i still find hardest to deal with though, being a very self-conscious person myself, is dealing with the attention you can attract in public situations sometimes. although i do have colleagues who are much more confident and self-assured and stuff like that is not a problem for them.

    The trouble with quotes on the internet is that you never know if they are genuine - Abraham Lincoln

  • I have a social care worker she's acctually due to come this morning i get charged £28.50 a week weather i go or not i've been signed up since the beging of febuary and have only been out twice for two cups of coffee and to a garden center I am seriously thinking of cancelling because there is nothing to do around here that warnets £28.50 a week :(

  • i used to work in a council run childrens home offering respite care to children with very severe learning and physical disabilities.


    i had the same fears as you, and remember so clearly thinking "i can't do this, this is too hard." but eight years later i was still there and loving it. once you get through that initial fear it will be totally worth it.


    there are down sides and you have to be able to cope with a great deal of frustration. especially where paperwork, beuraucracy and H&S legistlation is concerned, and i confess to often breaking the rules because they were so frustratingly stupid and lacking in any form of compassion.


    as for the ickiness...i had some of the worst kind of experiences you can possibly imagine, and the job was still worth it. you develop a stomach lined with lead, to the point that i could be eating my dinner when a child would vomit, so i'd hold their head up, clean up, go straight back to eating my dinner and then do it all over again! i've lost a lot of that ability now, but you develop it, and fast!

    “Twenty years from now you will be more disappointed by the things that you didn't do than by the ones you did do. So throw off the bowlines. Sail away from the safe harbor. Catch the trade winds in your sails. Explore. Dream. Discover.” -Mark Twain



  • as for the ickiness...i had some of the worst kind of experiences you can possibly imagine, and the job was still worth it. you develop a stomach lined with lead, to the point that i could be eating my dinner when a child would vomit, so i'd hold their head up, clean up, go straight back to eating my dinner and then do it all over again! i've lost a lot of that ability now, but you develop it, and fast!



    Yeah, I have a friend Rebecca and she said exactley the same thing because she used to work in care, you become desensitised over time....

    'You have not seen a real women, untill you have seen a beautifal hippy girl dancing bare foot in a field'

  • Social care work is where i may head when i start looking at going back to work too. can cope with icky (i was been a midwifery trainee for a long time, once you have seen birth, a little bit of icky is nothin, lol) and worked as part time physio assistant with my mum for a while, and i loved that. we had this lovely chap who had been bedbound/chairbound for years, and we got him standing and getting himself to the loo for the first time in a long time, it was awsome:) we also sorted him some books ontapes. cos he missed reading (after a stroke), stuff like that put such a smile on his face, it was worth every minute i spent there.


    I'd also like to work with young families, young parents needing support, cos i remember what its like and how lonely and scary it can be trying to be a mum in a world that is pretty predudiced against anyone having kids at the age i did or younger.

    Turned on, tuned in, loved up, trippin out, freaky on the outside, shiny in the middle.

  • This is a brilliant thread and packed with so much useful information. In the 'animateurs' thread, I related a strange experience with the Salvation Army - offering me a job, other than the one I applied for, working with the homeless because my CRB check threw up an decades old drug bust - which really put me off the idea of working for them. What a strange 'qualification'. I thought a drug bust would automatically disqualify an applicant from working with vulnerable people. I have no social care qualifictions at all.


    But having read of your experiences here I think you have cajoled me into looking into this further, with regards to qualications and so forth. Or 'furthur' for all the old hippies out there.


    Icky? :eek: Well I've had sprogs, exuding from both ends ...


    Love & light - :waves:

  • I've been working in social care for about 10 years.I got into it after my wife and I started fostering.I'd been stuck in engineering since I left school and needed a change.
    Best move I ever made,work wise.
    If you are looking into this kind of work think carefully into which area you wish to work.I work with autistic adults with severe learning disabiliteis and challenging behaviours.If you wish to work with challenging behaviour you MUST have patience,be thick skinned and not take the verbal and physical abuse personally.
    I'd recommend you give it a go..very rewarding job


  • I used to work with vunerable teens in care homes. It was the last resort before they were locked up so they were quite a challenging bunch. Worth it though.


    That's what I would like to do, or similar. I'd like to work with children and teenagers.


    Think I might have to go to the job centre and find some more info :thumbup:

  • That's what I would like to do, or similar. I'd like to work with children and teenagers.


    Think I might have to go to the job centre and find some more info :thumbup:


    I would just look in the back of your local paper. There were always lots of care jobs advertised in the Taunton papers.


  • Think I might have to go to the job centre and find some more info :thumbup:



    Job centre web site has loads of jobs available for social care.. I been on myself.. Its a very good resource.

    'You have not seen a real women, untill you have seen a beautifal hippy girl dancing bare foot in a field'

  • Great thread, learning things all the time

    I work for Mencap teaching adults with learning disabilities woodwork.
    No 2 days are ever the same but never wake up dreading going to work, it can be a challenge at times but also rewarding, maybe not in money terms but in lots of other way.
    spent the first month with Mencap going on all sorts of training, H&s, PBM, manual handling, even self defence!

  • Job centre web site has loads of jobs available for social care.. I been on myself.. Its a very good resource.




    Also connexions now deals with adult training and careers....i work with young people who are struggling with mainstream education....i deliver a kind of alternative cirriculum, mainly dealing with self esteem, anti bullying and life skills.....i love it:D

    A good place to look for social care/ community jobs is your local county council websites....they are also updated regularly and most of the time you can apply on line.

  • Also connexions now deals with adult training and careers....i work with young people who are struggling with mainstream education....i deliver a kind of alternative cirriculum, mainly dealing with self esteem, anti bullying and life skills.....i love it:D

    A good place to look for social care/ community jobs is your local county council websites....they are also updated regularly and most of the time you can apply on line.


    That sounds quite rewarding :D


    MY local council are absolutely useless when it comes to decent jobs though - the only care work there is is in old people's homes or disabled residential carehomes, neither of which I want. I want to work with young people, but not very young children in a creche or anything like that. :S

  • That sounds quite rewarding :D

    MY local council are absolutely useless when it comes to decent jobs though - the only care work there is is in old people's homes or disabled residential carehomes, neither of which I want. I want to work with young people, but not very young children in a creche or anything like that. :S



    it is....ive worked with young people for the last 16yrs, mostly young people who have difficulities of some kind, could be social or emotional difficulties.....the reason i mentioned the county council is because they should have a job section on their site....if thats no good, try youth support/ youth offending team....do you know of any community centres? they are normally the places to go for info....especially info on working with young people.:D good luck mate x