americans

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  • please can someone tell me what to call people from the USA?
    I don't want to call them Americans, or North Americans, because there's lots of other countries in the Americas other than our special friend.
    the only thing i can think of is Citizen of the United States of American, which is a tad long-winded, and USAian obviously isn't right.. there must be something??

    we reenact Noah's ancient drama, but in reverse, like a film running backwards, the animals exiting

  • Septics ;)


    hahaha i had to look that up!


    i wanted the term for an essay though, and don't imagine that my lecturer would think well of that lol


    i will force myself to change the sentence structure


    altho it is a bit weird that they don't have their own name

    we reenact Noah's ancient drama, but in reverse, like a film running backwards, the animals exiting


  • :D


    You could always shorten Citizens of the United States to: CUNST *cough*


    :whistle: :xdeer:

    "The only rules that really matter are these: what a man can do and what a man can't do."

  • Isnt cuba officially part of the american continent? Not sure theyd appreciate 'citizens of the united states of america'..or are the 'united states' different from the continent?

  • They call & see themselves as Americans, so why not call them by that. Or, if you know what state they're from, call them by the state name they're from. E.g. Muffy is from Virginia, so she would be a Virginian, Texas = Texan.

  • Isnt cuba officially part of the american continent? Not sure theyd appreciate 'citizens of the united states of america'..or are the 'united states' different from the continent?


    united states is just the obama bit and i wanted a term other than americans to differentiate between them and all americans i.e. inc canada, mexico, brazil, cuba etc etc


    but okay i will live with the fact that there is no such term, thank you nos

    we reenact Noah's ancient drama, but in reverse, like a film running backwards, the animals exiting

  • @elphqueenofrohan


    Just a point of fact. Geographically the British Isles include England, Wales, Scotland, the Isle of Man, Northern Ireland, & the Republic of Ireland. But when we use the term British it usually constitutes coming from the United Kingdom of Great Britain & Northern Ireland, but not the Irish Republic.


    Just thought I'd throw that in the pot. :)

  • The restraint needed with a question like this deserves a medal :whistle: But do non-obama americans see themselves as American? Dont canadians in particular get quite upset at being referred to that way despite it being technically accurate?


    Do the non-obama parts see it sort of like we did about being European until recently? As in,sod what the map says,we are 'insert country'ians?


    Hi Nos :waves: Hows you and muffy?

  • medusa , all things considered, fine thanks. Been a tough time though. Been over a year now since moving to the US. Had to move into a cheaper place (a one bed apartment) in Muffy's home town. But slowly getting there. :xwink:


    Ah, get the picture now. USA = Americans (misconstrued but accepted generally) , Canada = Canadians (both generally considered North Americans). Mexico = Mexicans (& so forth) to Panama in the central belt (Central America) & south from Panama to the Tierra del Fuego is considered South America.


    Check out Wikipedia on the Americas: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Americas

  • Interesting question. Hope you all don't mind if I spout on a bit (LOL).

    "America" should mean the whole of N, S and Central America (Baffin Island to Tierra del Fuego). However, the first post-Columbus independent state was the USA, so this came to be called "America", at least in English, and its citizens are called "Americans". In Spanish, "Americano" means someone from the Americas, and someone from the USA is a "Estadounidense" - "Unitedstatesish" - you could coin this word in English, but you'll have to explain yourself in a footnote (!). I would use "US citizens", or just "US" as an adjective. The oddest thing is that the USA includes Hawaii, which is not even part of America in the true sense.

    Loads of countries have this sort of thing.

    I can think of all the following meanings for "Britain" and "British":

    1. The main island
    2. The political entity of "Great Britain", i.e. England, Scotland and Wales, which was a nation state from 1707 to 1801, consisting of the island, plus Wight, Skye, Mull, etc.
    3. The UK nation state. This is inaccurate, because it is really the "UK of Great Britain and Northern Island", but things like Olympic teams, and the GB car signs equate UK and Britain
    4. The British Isles: This includes the UK, Republic of Ireland, and the Isle of Man
    5. The "British Islands": This is a technical diplomatic term, meaning the UK, Isle of Man, and Channel Isles
    6. Britannia, the Roman province: What is now Wales and most of England
    7. The British, in history between about 400 and 800, is used in contrast with the English, to mean the people who would become Welsh and Cornish.

    To complicate matters further, in a lot of places people use "England" as synonymous with "Britain".

    English people tend to use "Holland" to mean the modern nation, but Dutch people object, because Holland is just one province, and say that we should say "Netherlands". However, "Netherlands" has several meanings:
    1. The country in Europe
    2. The Kingdom of the Netherlands: This includes the country in Europe, and also some parts of the Caribbean.
    3. "Netherlands" (Low Countries: Nether Lands) can include Belgium, which used to be the Spanish Netherlands. In Dutch, they distinguish between "Nederland" (singular), which is just the modern Netherlands, and "Nederlanden" (plural), which includes Belgium.

    I think the solution is to either be really pedantic and long-winded, or to just not give a damn.

  • Dont canadians in particular get quite upset at being referred to that way despite it being technically accurate?


    Quite correct.


    It helps to remember that North and South America are two different continents. So, "Americas", plural, refers to the two continents and nearby islands; "America" , singular, refers to the USA.


    "American" almost always refers to citizens of the USA. It is not a useful term if it has any other meaning. If you want to refer collectively to inhabitants of both continents, you would say, "North and South Americans", or "inhabitants of the Americas" if you want to include Caribbean islanders.


    Canadians are North Americans, as are Mexicans and Americans. (Greenlanders ought to be, too, but they probably think of themselves as Scandinavians.) We are most certainly not "Americans"!

  • Hope you all don't mind if I spout on a bit (LOL).
    I can think of all the following meanings for "Britain" and "British": ...


    Thanks, that's the best definition I've ever heard.


    One of my brood has an American mother; he was born in London but sees himself as an American. Depending what company he is in he will also answer to Septic, Yank or Buddy. He grew up in Oakland (Cal) so he doesn't mind being called an Oakie but, technically, he never was one in the true sense. Now he lives in Baltimore and works in DC. When questioned he claims to be a child of the world but since that's a bit of mouthful so he's okay with Obaman, especially now as he works for the guy.


    Someone mentioned Hawaii being (politically) part of America (USA) and this always makes me chortle because (pardon me for wandering slightly off thread) after the twin towers debacle Bush said it was the worst attack on the US since Pearl Harbour - except Pearl Harbour (in Hawaii) wasn't part of the USA at the time of the attack. It was a naval base the Yanks leased from Hawaii. So, in effect, national sovereignty is a confusion of cartographers depending who is telling the story. Although I'm prepared for our American friends to set me straight on that one.

  • Hawaii wasn't part of the USA at the time of Pearl Harbour, but it was a colony (dependent territory, or whatever the term is).

    The USA still has numerous such territories, and they seem to be regarded as loosely part of the USA. I've been to one of them, Saipan, south of Japan and east of the Philippines, and the breakfast radio programme is called "Where America's day begins".

  • Bush said it was the worst attack on the US since Pearl Harbour - except Pearl Harbour (in Hawaii) wasn't part of the USA at the time of the attack.


    yes - well we hardly expect Bush to get anything right do we???


    yeh it will have to do! although, ironically, 'citizen' makes me think of russians

    that's interesting. it makes me think of the french revolution!!! or cane - which is yank!


    good luck with the essay anyway!

  • i finished it, using 'people from the USA' lol.. added to my word count anyway


    i think the citizens thing is cos of reading so much russian literature.. i love "citizeness" :D

    we reenact Noah's ancient drama, but in reverse, like a film running backwards, the animals exiting

  • yeh it will have to do! although, ironically, 'citizen' makes me think of russians



    I thought it would make you of all people think of the French Revolution, and Citizen Robespierre!

  • I won't think of Robespierre if I can help it! There are few people I dislike more - and he had no excuses for what he did, because he was intelligent and well educated.

    we reenact Noah's ancient drama, but in reverse, like a film running backwards, the animals exiting

  • Ah, Citizen Bonaparte!! :D

    Now what we really need is a Napoleon smiley!