caged hens

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  • does anyone know of any current campaigns to but a stop to cage farming? i am trying to persuade a leading supermarket to only sell free range eggs, like waitrose have.
    i don't personally eat eggs, but i want an end to this cruelty.
    i can't do it alone and i'm sure there is already stuff being done
    nik x:wall:

  • The best way to stop supermarkets from stocking any product is to stop buying them. As soon as sales of an item fall they replace it with something else as fast as possible, because shelf space to them is money and the only thing that supermarkets ever really listen to is the bottom line of their accounting books. So with that in mind, I would suggest trying to harness people's spending power by getting buyers to boycott buying caged hen eggs.


    If you can get enough publicity for your campaign and cause a stir in the press that gets people to change their shopping habits, then you will have more chance to change the supermarkets stocking policies.

  • I have free range hens laying eggs,[its brill] 2012 there is a european ban on all single cage battery type production. So not long to wait as british producers are getting geared up to produce many more free range eggs. The super markets will have to follow the free range trend.

  • I have free range hens laying eggs,[its brill] 2012 there is a european ban on all single cage battery type production. So not long to wait as british producers are getting geared up to produce many more free range eggs. The super markets will have to follow the free range trend.


    They'll still be in cages from what i've read... but the cages will be bigger and include perches for roosting etc.


    Whilst i'm glad of the change, i wish it eliminated cages completely. I wonder how they will label eggs that will come from chickens in the new cages? I'd like people to still be able to distinguish them from "free range" etc.

  • ....wonder how they will label eggs that will come from chickens in the new cages? ....



    They'll probably just keep labeliing them things like "Barn Fresh" which is a non-term they seem to use for battery eggs.

    And even free range aren't necessarily free range as most people tend to think of it......the chickens just need access to the outdoors from where ever they are kept and if that's a large barn with a couple of doors then that's ok. The fact that you might get a few territorial hens at the doorways stopping other hens getting out (so the hens stuck in the middle never see the light of day) is neither here nor there :S

  • Enriched cages there called but still cages, A cage is a cage so its still crap.
    Barn eggs are birds kept in a big airy barn with no restrictions but still no access to the outside. Freedome foods an RSPCA department regulate free range hens very well,as the hens are let out early in the morning and shut up secure from preditors at night, with all freedome to come and go food and water at all times. witha nice cosey place to lay thier eggs, YUM YUM.
    so only buy freedome food eggs, their logo is on the box.

  • The EU has drawn up a plan for all Battery Cages to house chickens at 750 sq. centimeters per bird (just under two A4 sheets of paper) by the year 2012.
    It will also be necessary for birds to have a nesting area with litter plus a scratching pad and a perch.
    the previous was :The minimum legal requirement of space for one bird is just under three quarters the size of an A4 sheet of paper.
    Most farms have 4 or 5 birds per cage. The cages being approx. 20 inches x 20 inches (500 x 500)
    http://www.downthelane.net/broiler.php

  • Hens in the wild lay only 20 eggs a year, which will mostly have been fertilised by a cockerel and will hatch. There are no cockerels in battery sheds so all eggs are infertile. The battery hen has been bred to produce an unbelievable 300 eggs a year - nearly one a day. However, this breeding has not stripped them of their instincts and desires. Like hens in the wild, they need a safe, private place to lay their eggs, something which is not available when sharing a cage with so many other birds. The process can take up to an hour or more, during which time they will attempt to hide from their cage mates. The frustration often makes them become aggressive. Hens lay eggs because it is a bodily function which they have no control over, not because they are "happy"
    Creatures whose nature is to move around almost ceaselessly during daylight hours must, when restricted like this, somehow substitute their desire to peck and scratch in the ground. The only source of interest left to them is the feathers and flesh of their cage mates which they frequently peck - sometimes to death. If you were squashed into a phone box with four other people - maybe people you didn't even like - perhaps you would become aggressive after a few months (or a few days?!). These "vices" could be stopped by providing a decent amount of space but instead of this many farmers practice beak trimming - a red-hot blade removes part of the beak when the birds are young. Some die from bleeding or shock.
    The combination of a lack of fresh air and daylight, selective breeding, and caging in overcrowded conditions has led to the spread of diseases and to distress and suffering. Prolapses, egg peritonitis, cancers, infectious bronchitis and Gumboro disease are just a few of the conditions that thrive in battery houses. The bones of battery hens are often so brittle that they will snap like dry twigs. The Agricultural and Food Research Council states that one third of battery hens suffer from broken bones. A review of all scientific studies on battery farming by the University of Edinburgh concludes that "battery hens suffer" and that battery cages should be outlawed. But then you didn't need a scientist to tell you that, did you? The two million battery hens that die each year in their cages are testimony to that.
    Public protest has led to a small victory for hens. The EU agreed in 1999 to a phase-out of barren battery cages. From 1st of January 2012 the use of conventional cages is prohibited. Only 'enriched' cages will be permitted. This sounds great – but tragically “enriched cages” still mean hens being crammed together in small spaces, with only a tiny amount more space each than in battery systems.
    Barn systems basically means thousand of birds packed to a shed. They are not caged but still have very little space (25 hens per square metre). They are able to perch on raised perches or platforms. Deep litter systems are similar but perches are not provided.
    Free Range
    Free range hens are usually kept in deep litter or barn sheds but must have continuous access to outdoors in the day – an area which is supposed to be "mainly covered with vegetation". Current EU marketing rules allow 1000 hens per hectare of outdoor range. Some smaller scale operations exist where small flocks are kept in moveable houses on more natural landscapes of woodland. Obviously the genuine free range system is much better than the battery – however the negatives are often that the flocks are too large so that many birds never roam outside. Females are still killed at the end of their laying life for ‘low grade’ meat and the male chicks are all killed as they can’t lay eggs. Mother hens never meet their own chicks – their strong maternal feelings utterly denied.

  • Post by lazydog ().

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  • Isn't there a campaign completely devoted to this issue? I can't remember what it's called, but I think it still exists.
    And thanks LazyD, I knew that, but it's good to be reminded.

  • Isn't there a campaign completely devoted to this issue? I can't remember what it's called, but I think it still exists.
    And thanks LazyD, I knew that, but it's good to be reminded.


    there are a few but things have gone a bit awry cause of the credit crunch
    battery cages are beening out lawed but are very much in demand in other parts of the eu so the "birds are screwed" due to custurmer demand
    sheeple will not learn quaility and compasion are worth a few pence extra
    the same people would thing it cruel/disgusting to go shoot a wild rabbit and eat it they like things the right shape and size and cheap they dont care where from:whistle:

  • As I said before buy FREEDOME FOOD EGGS, as these birds are housed at 9 birds per square meter this seems alot but they do have lots of space at that. I manage a free range unit and only half the birds ever go out. there are no dominant hens that block the door way, they can see the door open from the other side of the shed but the truth is they are couch potatos and cant be bothered. my pop holes are 2 mters wide there are 14 of them vertualy one side of the house is open. We have the hen that goes miles all over the 22acre range others just like to stay home.

  • As I said before buy FREEDOME FOOD EGGS, as these birds are housed at 9 birds per square meter this seems alot but they do have lots of space at that. I manage a free range unit and only half the birds ever go out. there are no dominant hens that block the door way, they can see the door open from the other side of the shed but the truth is they are couch potatos and cant be bothered. my pop holes are 2 mters wide there are 14 of them vertualy one side of the house is open. We have the hen that goes miles all over the 22acre range others just like to stay home.


    There's still the issue of the male chicks though, so i won't buy any (i'm vegan).


    The other day we drove past a huge field and i was surprised to see chickens running around in it (i could only just see them, the field was so big!). They had a small housing/nesting area in the middle where they are obviously locked up for the night. I thought it was amazing; a huge field for about 50 hens! If i was going to buy eggs it would be from there. Of course my happiness didn't last long once i got thinking about the males. :( But since there's not a lot of chance that we'll all stop eating eggs, then i'm all for people buying true free range like that.

  • Egg traceability. Buy eggs with the lion printed on it. All these eggs have a production number printed on the egg. eg, 1UK54321. The first number is the type of production. 0 is Organic, 1 is Free Range, 2 is Barn. and 3 is Caged, the UK speaks for itself and the long number is the farm production code.

    Try this for more info,
    http://www.lioneggfarms.co.uk

  • The problem is that people will always want caged hen eggs because they are cheaper than the free range eggs. Its basically a twisted supply and demand, I think the only reason people buy them is because of the price. Perhaps if free range eggs were the same price as caged hen eggs then there would not be an issue. However I do not eat caged hen eggs, in fact thinking about it I can't remember the last time I ate an egg.

    You shut your mouth. How can you say I go about things the wrong way? I am human and I need to be loved just like everybody else does

  • HELPING CAGED HENS
    Dear Supporters
    Do you care about caged hens everywhere or just caged hens in the UK?

    This is your chance to help us improve life for laying hens wherever they happen to be by encouraging our government to adopt clear food labeling allowing consumers to make an informed choice when buying food. Processed foods could contain eggs in any form and if you want to know when you’re buying something which contains, for example, dried egg from caged hens in India, then we’ll explain how you can help us get you this information.

    In collaboration with South-West MP, Colin Breed, we have tabled two Early Day Motions in the UK parliament. An Early Day Motion (EDM) is a ‘political petition’ which only MPs can sign to show their support for political issues. Both EDMs ask MPs to support better food labeling so we can be sure we are supporting those farmers with free range hens. Details of the EDM’s can be viewed by clicking on the links below:

    EDM 234: PRODUCTION METHOD LABELLING ON PROCESSED FOODS CONTAINING EGG AND EGG DERIVATIVES

    and

    EDM 239: LABELLING OF SHELL EGGS PRODUCED BY HENS IN ENRICHED CAGE SYSTEM

    Some MPs have already signed the petitions, but we need more and we really need YOUR help. We want to see more free range hens, and don’t want to see an increase in caged hens anywhere in the world, so this is our opportunity to protect our British free range farmers and help prevent more hens being put in cages way out of our reach. Please ask your MP to sign EDM’s 234 and 239 in support of improved welfare for egg laying hens and support for British egg farmers

    You can find the direct contact details for your MP here

    Or

    Click here to find your MP and send your email

    Download a sample letter (MS Word version) or (PDF version)which you can copy or feel free to send a letter of your own.

    This campaign aims to prevent cheap battery eggs laid by caged hens outside the EU from being used in our foods without our knowledge, it’s so important to all laying hens that you take part to prevent imports of egg products from countries where welfare is out of our control.