dye made from plants?

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  • ive been thinking of tie dying again & ive bought dylon for it, not sure what sort of fixative to use that would be eco friendly also is dylon eco friendly?, i'll still just use the lot i bought but i think after that i would like to find natural dyes & fixatives, so just wondering if i can find them in plant form in me own back yard [not sure if im in the right forum for this] :hippy:

  • You can grow woad or indigo to use as colour. I sell the seeds although I have never actually tried it myself as I'm only getting my garden growing proper this year.

  • If its any help, i have a mate who spins, with her own spinnig wheel. She uses natural vegetable dyes, to dye her wool. I'll ask her wot she knows and get back to you....

    "Going to Starbucks for coffee is like going to prison for sex. You know you're going to get it, but it's going to be rough."

  • Onion skins are fab. Dont have comprehensive detaills but my daughter used them in school. Beetroot was excellent too. Salt was used as a fixative.



    I was going to say beetroot too! Not sure what you do with it but it makes Pink :)

  • You can grow woad or indigo to use as colour. I sell the seeds although I have never actually tried it myself as I'm only getting my garden growing proper this year.


    thanks Anne, but witch plants make those colours? or is that any plant? :hippy:actually may be thats a silly question

  • If its any help, i have a mate who spins, with her own spinnig wheel. She uses natural vegetable dyes, to dye her wool. I'll ask her wot she knows and get back to you....


    thanks mate :hippy::D

  • Onion skins are fab. Dont have comprehensive detaills but my daughter used them in school. Beetroot was excellent too. Salt was used as a fixative.


    thanks akasha, oinion skins, now thats interesting, would never of thought of that
    i'll be crying though:D

  • I was going to say beetroot too! Not sure what you do with it but it makes Pink :)


    i had thought of beetroot but because its so dark i would expect it to be purple but pinks ok
    thanks:D

  • best i can do is offer advice on making brown green red and sometimes yellow stains ewwwwwwww hahaha eat to much beetroot it comes out red


    natural berries like goose berries blue berries raspberries black berries ;) grass stain the clothes lol

  • ive been thinking of tie dying again & ive bought dylon for it, not sure what sort of fixative to use that would be eco friendly also is dylon eco friendly?, i'll still just use the lot i bought but i think after that i would like to find natural dyes & fixatives, so just wondering if i can find them in plant form in me own back yard [not sure if im in the right forum for this] :hippy:


    From memory, i was advised that the material you wish to dye should be unbleached, if it is to accept a natural dye. Some plant materials will contain a natural fixative, such as tannin in tea leaves. Tumeric, Walnut husks, Oak Galls are some of the other things i have tried without using a fixative. To get, say onion skins, to fix you must first put the fixative (OR MORDANT- derived from french, to bite, i think) onto the yarn or fabric. The dye can't bite onto the, say wool, but the 'mordant' can and then the color will bite onto the 'mordant'. Alum, copper, iron, zinc are often used or combinations. All with varying color results.
    As for back yard plants, i've had success with nettles, dock, rhubarb, ferns, walnut husks etc. Most plants at this latitude give green, brown and yellow colours (even beetroot i believe). The more vivid colors mainly come from latitudes that get alot more sunshine.