Natural waterproofing

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  • I really need to waterproof something i made for my garden and was wondering if anyone knew of a way to do this naturally.
    I know i can buy stuff like fabrsil, but i am looking to do it in an eco way.

    The material is just ordinary cotton and i can put it in the washing machince if it needs to be washed, so it's not too big.

    Am keeping it a secret for now, as if it works i want to share with ppl at Trevstock, so it's a surprise. But don't tell campertess or she'll go mad with curisousity.....:insane:Also if it works then i could make one for some of our other hippy gathering, so fingers crossed and if you have *any* ideas, please pass them on to me.

    Thanks in advance folks.:clap:

  • I hadn't thought of that, but now you say it, i can see how it would be very good, only thing is that Lanolin comes from sheep and is also know as wool-fat, wool-wax and wool-grease and is a by product of the meat industry.

    Now while this doesn't really bother me, will the veggies think it a bad thing, don't want to offen, as i'd like to make some more as gifts to people for gatherings.

  • ...it comes from processing wool I think. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lanolin
    Most veggies are OK with wool, vegans are not. I am veggie, but I use lanolin to waterproof Izzy's nappy wraps. Hope that helps :)



    Yeah i read that after i posted, still a bit worried about folks being offened, but it's the best idea so far. Am trying to find a place to buy it in a large quantity, a gallon i think. Google is not being kind.

    Stardust dad i like you idea, but i think i may need a lot and i have no idea where to get it from. Especially in the quantities i would need.

  • Y

    Stardust dad i like you idea, but i think i may need a lot and i have no idea where to get it from. Especially in the quantities i would need.


    Some of the older hardware stores may sell it in big chunks - I had a piece once that I used to waterproof the thread that I sewed aeroplane wings with.

  • Some of the older hardware stores may sell it in big chunks - I had a piece once that I used to waterproof the thread that I sewed aeroplane wings with.



    Well i do have a lot of it for useing in my restorration work, however i wouldn't know how to go about it and can't find anyway to do it on inter-net.

    Also is there anything you can mix it with to make it go further.
    Then there's the vegans to worry about, as i really don't want to offend anyone, as i said it's a gift to ppl for gatherings.

  • Although it's still wax, if you decide to go down that route maybe something like the spray wax proofing for 'barbour' type wax cotton jackets might be easier than straight bees wax. Something else that might be worth experimenting with could be watered down PVA glue painted on.

  • Although it's still wax, if you decide to go down that route maybe something like the spray wax proofing for 'barbour' type wax cotton jackets might be easier than straight bees wax. Something else that might be worth experimenting with could be watered down PVA glue painted on.



    I need it to be eco friendly and so far most of the stuff you spray on has chemicals, went to camping shops and cyclist shops today and they all have chemicals, even the nikwax cotton proof stuff.

    Linseed oil was used to water proof tents in the old days.



    i have heard this before, however i need to know how it is used and applied, any chance that you know.


  • Quote:
    Originally Posted by Greenthing
    Linseed oil was used to water proof tents in the old days.

    i have heard this before, however i need to know how it is used and applied, any chance that you know.


    Do be very careful with linseed oil. If applied to something with a large surface area such as rags for instance, it has a nasty tendency to burst into flames all on it's own. I've used it a lot for oiling and sealing wooden handles and nearly had my workshop burn down a couple of times before I started soaking the rags in water before I got rid of them.


    PVA is water-soluble, isn't it?


    It is until it's cured and then it's waterproof. I've used it before for proofing pirate hats made out of paper.

  • Do be very careful with linseed oil. If applied to something with a large surface area such as rags for instance, it has a nasty tendency to burst into flames all on it's own. I've used it a lot for oiling and sealing wooden handles and nearly had my workshop burn down a couple of times before I started soaking the rags in water before I got rid of them.



    Well after death, fire is my biggest fear (been in 2 house fires), so now am scared to death of using linseed oil i don't fancy burnning the house down lol

    :book::bang:

  • Well after death, fire is my biggest fear (been in 2 house fires), so now am scared to death of using linseed oil i don't fancy burnning the house down lol

    :book::bang:


    Its the first time i have heard that it catches fire on its own, i always thought that you cant start a fire without a spark.
    Anyhoo you can use a paint brush to apply it hence no oily rags in a workshop.
    You can always preform the application outside.
    Even modern tents catch fire if you don't take the correct precautions.

  • Its the first time i have heard that it catches fire on its own, i always thought that you cant start a fire without a spark.
    Anyhoo you can use a paint brush to apply it hence no oily rags in a workshop.
    You can always preform the application outside.
    Even modern tents catch fire if you don't take the correct precautions.


    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/L…il#Spontaneous_combustion


    It's very easy to cause spontaneous combustion under the right circumstances, no need for a spark a lot of the time (In fact, a traditional fire piston will start something burning with nothing but compressed air). All I was trying to do was point out the possibles dangers to someone who may not have been aware of them. Depending on what it's being painted onto, in my experience there could still be a slight risk, especially if it's something papery or with a largeish area.


  • All I was trying to do was point out the possibles dangers to someone who may not have been aware of them. Depending on what it's being painted onto, in my experience there could still be a slight risk, especially if it's something papery or with a largeish area.


    No problems mate you did the right thing good posting, i did not know it was possible, you learn something new everyday:thumbup:.