Cognitive Behavioural Therapy

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  • Hi.


    I've just started a course of Cognitive Behavioural Therapy to help me get over some issues.
    I was just wondering if anybody else has any experiences with CBT that they'd be willing to share, as I'm a little unsure of what I should expect from the sessions.

  • I've had some CBT, I thought it was a load of crap to be honest. I found it insulted my intelligence and I seemed to know more about psychology than the "psychologist." Plus, my issues are hard-wired.


    However that's just my experience, I have read of many people saying it was great, which it probably is for specific phobias etc.

  • Good luck :) I'm halfway through CAT, which isn't quite the same but imagine it has some similarities!!
    Seriously, it's been life-changing, I feel a much better person for it.
    It's been quite difficult at times - having to address issues you might not like to talk about and being painfully honest and intimate with a stranger - but the more you can say and tell the therapist about how you're feeling the more they will be able to help you


    i recommend 'mind over mood' it's a great book to help complement the course, it seems patronising at first (at least i found it so) but was helpful if you listen to it!! you can get book prescriptions from drs (at least you can in wales?) and they have them in the libraries so you might be able to get it out that way


    either way good luck :)

    we reenact Noah's ancient drama, but in reverse, like a film running backwards, the animals exiting

  • I've had some CBT, I thought it was a load of crap to be honest. I found it insulted my intelligence and I seemed to know more about psychology than the "psychologist." Plus, my issues are hard-wired.

    However that's just my experience, I have read of many people saying it was great, which it probably is for specific phobias etc.



    i don't think any issues are hard-wired and therapy can help anyone (and it is recommended everyone has it at some point - though of course that's impractical)
    but then getting on with your therapist is important too I guess

    we reenact Noah's ancient drama, but in reverse, like a film running backwards, the animals exiting

  • Having an introverted intense personality is hard-wired. Having autism or Asperger's is how the brain is wired up and cannot be changed (thankfully)


    CBT will help some people struggling with phobias, anxiety and other disorders but not the above.

  • This current CBT program is being used by the NHS 'as a treat all' solution at the expense of all other mental health services. I'm very cynical about how this course has been put together and facilitated with a cross & mix of CBT's in one program. Try it and keep at it!

  • I had CBT for a while. At times I found it useful and at times I found it really frustrating.

    Its more collaborative than counselling (I think?) Its not just about you speaking and the other person listening...its about looking at ways of solving things together.

    Its kindof about trying to uncover destructive thought patterns, change them and therfore change destructive behaviour.

    I had 8 sessions... which felt helpful for a while afterwards.. but I dont personally feel that I had enough sessions for it to have helped in the long term.

    As with most therapy, the connection you have to the person talking to you is the most important thing.

    :) Best of luck with it x x x

  • Good luck with the CBT, I hope you get something from it. ;)


    I've heard mixed reviews about its effectiveness, I guess everyone responds differently, and yes, it depends what your issues are too.


    I suffer from anxiety so have been meaning to try it for a while to see if it might help me in "re-thinking" some of my responses to situations... thats if I can "re-train" my brain into doing it though! :D


    There is a free CBT website called "Mood Gym"...you might be interested in googling it if you'd like to get some idea of the sorts of things it entails before you start your course. :)

  • I've had some CBT, I thought it was a load of crap to be honest. I found it insulted my intelligence and I seemed to know more about psychology than the "psychologist." Plus, my issues are hard-wired.

    However that's just my experience, I have read of many people saying it was great, which it probably is for specific phobias etc.



    I thought exactly the same thing, however 18months down the line I find myself using there 5 point regularly without even thinking about it. I think I used CBT without knowing it for many years.

    My advice would be, even if you think its a lot of bollocks, keep going.

    Interesting you should mention that your issues are hardwired, coz that is exactly what CBT is used for................it takes a lot of time and practice though, and hard work. It is not a quick fix.


  • Interesting you should mention that your issues are hardwired, coz that is exactly what CBT is used for................it takes a lot of time and practice though, and hard work. It is not a quick fix.


    As I said before..........Having an introverted intense personality is hard-wired. Having autism or Asperger's is how the brain is wired up and cannot be changed (thankfully)


    CBT will help some people struggling with phobias, anxiety and other disorders but not the above.

  • I am a mental health nurse and although not trained in this specifically have found that it is mostly very effective. The sessions that you do with the therapist are more about learning the techiques which you have to keep using to get the benefits from. I would disagree with the previous post that you cannot change intrenched thinking patterns. In the case of Autistic spectrum disorders you cannot, i agree. But for most people you can change thinking patterns. We do it unconciously every day in response to our changing circumstances and life events. CBT is about making these changes conciously and in positive ways, rather than unconciously. Of all the various therapies it has been proven to be the most effective, at least as effective as antidepressants and more permanant. The relationship with the therapist is important, if they are good and you get a rapport with them it will be more effective, obviously.
    Good luck

  • I would disagree with the previous post that you cannot change intrenched thinking patterns. In the case of Autistic spectrum disorders you cannot, i agree. But for most people you can change thinking patterns.


    That's what I meant, you can't change Autistic Spectrum Disorders.

  • Having autism or Asperger's is how the brain is wired up and cannot be changed (thankfully)

    CBT will help some people struggling with phobias, anxiety and other disorders but not the above.



    I cannot imagine why anyone with Aspergers Syndrom or Autism would be sent to CBT in the first place, I couldnt agree with you more.

    EDIT: I have goven more thought to this, and have explained in a post below why I am retracting this.

  • I thought exactly the same thing, however 18months down the line I find myself using there 5 point regularly without even thinking about it. I think I used CBT without knowing it for many years.

    My advice would be, even if you think its a lot of bollocks, keep going.

    Interesting you should mention that your issues are hardwired, coz that is exactly what CBT is used for................it takes a lot of time and practice though, and hard work. It is not a quick fix.



    yep i totally agree! the reason i was put forward for CAT rather than CBT is because I have a lot of insight into my own problems and have already thought and worked through them as much as I could without CBT - so there was no point in that as I had clearly tried my best to change my behaviour through thought alone.
    That is because my issues were so hard-wired I had no idea where they could have come from and thought they were just my personality.
    seriously, i'm evidence for the fact that therapy works LOL

    if we're talking autism, aspergers etc., of course therapy can't help when it is something chemical, but when we're talking Issues rather than your fundamental make-up it almost always can!

    btw., you should NOT be on any drugs whilst going through therapy.

    we reenact Noah's ancient drama, but in reverse, like a film running backwards, the animals exiting

  • I cannot imagine why anyone with Aspergers Syndrom or Autism would be sent to CBT in the first place, I couldnt agree with you more.


    Well a lot of people with Asperger's/autism have co-morbid conditions such as mood and anxiety disorders, CBT can help with this but only if the therapist/psychologist has a thorough understanding of Autistic Spectrum Disorders (and the majority don't :rolleyes:)

  • Hi.

    I've just started a course of Cognitive Behavioural Therapy to help me get over some issues.
    I was just wondering if anybody else has any experiences with CBT that they'd be willing to share, as I'm a little unsure of what I should expect from the sessions.



    In answer to your question....yes I have experience of CBT, both personally for myself and as a practitioner. You've not said how many sessions you're having or for what. Having said that, personally I found the CBT format really useful in dealing with some of my fears and also in gaining an understanding of some of my beliefs about myself and how I view the world and others. EQOR has recommended Mind Over Mood and that is a helpful book. For a simple understanding, CBT for Dummies is good too, and I used this book to give me a simple straight forward overview.

    What to expect, expect quite a formal agenda session, expect homework between sessions, expect to be asked to look at your thoughts, feelings, physical reactions and behaviours in situation where you experience your paticular problems. Expect to have a collaborative working relationship, expect to have shared with you a concepualisation of your individual problem...and more.

    If you have some specific questions and pm me I'll answer if I can.

  • im going through it at the mo and whilst i get along really well with my therapist i can more or less say what hes gonna say before he says it
    i have great insight into my illness but i have been like this for nearly 14 years
    i couldent say as yet if its doing me any good to be honest

  • Well a lot of people with Asperger's/autism have co-morbid conditions such as mood and anxiety disorders, CBT can help with this but only if the therapist/psychologist has a thorough understanding of Autistic Spectrum Disorders (and the majority don't :rolleyes:)




    Cant agree with you on that one I'm afraid, and having thought about this overnight, I stand by my original statement. CBT cannot stop you having Aspergers or Autism however it can help in how you deal with how you react to those symptoms. I think if CBT is used properly it can help anyone. It cant stop you having Aspergers, and I do know my fair share on that matter, but it can help you to recognise your difficulties because of it and how you mentally approach those difficulties. It is the same for me, I am BiPolar1 with rapid emotional cycling, CBT cannot ever make me not BiPolar, but it can haelp with how I react to situations that it causes.

  • im going through it at the mo and whilst i get along really well with my therapist i can more or less say what hes gonna say before he says it
    i have great insight into my illness but i have been like this for nearly 14 years
    i couldent say as yet if its doing me any good to be honest



    This is the thing with CBT honey, at the time you dont think it is doing any good what so ever, but it is, it is teaching you the tools you need to help yourself once the therapy has stopped. I remember thinking exactly the same thing, but I met my counciller a few months ago and had coffee with him and was explaining how much it had helped since I stopped going to see him, he was delighted and asked if he could call on me as a case trial, I agreed and would be happy too.

  • Just my 2p's worth,I've been on both sides of the councelling table and went through a horrible part of my life that was helped immensly by councelling, but it took quite a while to find the right person, and the right form of councelling. CBT got my goat tbh, but I can see how it could work for some.
    I eventually settled on person centred, as it seemed so bloody obvious.
    The works of a chap called Carl Rogers are very interesting and informative.
    Stick with it, when i found the right one, it worked for me.

  • Well a lot of people with Asperger's/autism have co-morbid conditions such as mood and anxiety disorders, CBT can help with this but only if the therapist/psychologist has a thorough understanding of Autistic Spectrum Disorders (and the majority don't :rolleyes:)


    Having an introverted intense personality is hard-wired. Having autism or Asperger's is how the brain is wired up and cannot be changed (thankfully)


    CBT will help some people struggling with phobias, anxiety and other disorders but not the above.


    Cant agree with you on that one I'm afraid, and having thought about this overnight, I stand by my original statement. CBT cannot stop you having Aspergers or Autism however it can help in how you deal with how you react to those symptoms. I think if CBT is used properly it can help anyone. It cant stop you having Aspergers, and I do know my fair share on that matter, but it can help you to recognise your difficulties because of it and how you mentally approach those difficulties. It is the same for me, I am BiPolar1 with rapid emotional cycling, CBT cannot ever make me not BiPolar, but it can haelp with how I react to situations that it causes.


    I am with what weecab has written on this one. The brain is a hugely complex organism that we still don't know what is really going on up there.


    I am of the opinion that what is going on up there is similar to what happens with the internet. Messages get sent on neural pathways to different locations in the brain so that an action can be carried out. These pathways are learnt over time. It is entirely possible to create new pathways because old ones have become damaged. I came to this conclusion from my own experiences of a condition which effectively causes a Denial of Service on the part of my brain which controls memory function. After the event I suffer from amnesia as my brain cannot process new memories and retrive old ones, but after a while the brain creates new pathways and my memory function returns.


    I have a clinical diagnosis of having Aspergers, but I have found that it is entirely possible to overcome some of the difficulties that are associated with it by changing the way you think about things. There are people with the condition that probably will never be able to over come their difficulties, but there will be a few that will. I think CBT can in theory give you the tools to alter your thought processes and hence neural pathways which cause the problems in conditions such as Aspegers.

  • I was having Person Centred councelling at the same time I was having CBT. I can honestly say PC councelling saved my life. But I tend to call on CBT now that it is all after the fact.

  • im currently goingh thru both counselling and cbt im half way thru and still panicking like mad at things and getting anxious as a result my body physically is suffering. good luck with your cbt im sticking with mine in the hope it will work.

  • I've done cbt and theres nothing complicated or magical about it.Most people do it automatically to some extent and cbt just teaches you to be more aware of the thoughts you have and to challenge the unhelpful ones.


    For instance if someone cuts you up on the road and your thoughts are 'bastard,how dare they think they have the right to do that to me,I'm going to show them' youre getting wound up and stressed and might react by thumping the horn,tailgating them to teach them a lesson (or shooting them if youre american) and its all going to get messy.Whereas if you pause and make yourself think 'Ok,that was a stupid thing for that driver to do but its not directed at me,they might have had a good reason for being in such a hurry' you can let it go and it doesnt stress you.


    It can be incredibly helpful with depression/anxiety and self esteem issues but its not a quick fix when those issues are deep rooted.If you have a voice in your head saying basically 'I'm not good enough' its gonna take more than just saying to yourself 'actually I am' to change the feelings and reactions from that original thought.But if you keep at it you can eventually wear the original thought down so it doesnt bother arguing with you anymore.And your new thought becomes the default thought for the future.


    I agree with Ethereal though that it doesnt work for everything.Its a logic and thought based therapy so chemical and physical brain 'differences' and body trauma where the thought process has been disconnected arent going to be touched by it.Although like weecab said it can help with how you deal with the effects of those things.


    It does seem incredibly patronising at first because of the way 'new' thoughts are worded.But if you can get past that it makes a hell of a lot of sense and it really is worth doing.


    Good luck:thumbup:

  • althouh cbt wont take my bp away its worked wonders in helping me deal with the issues surrounding it and how i cope. its hard work to do it properly and takes a lot of work. i have been lent a eally good book from my sw to help keep it going between sessions and a cd of positive thinking hypnosis has also made a huge diffrence to my life :angel:

  • Wow, quite a mixed response to CBT then. My problems are all based around self-worth, social anxiety as a result of things that happened to me when I was a child.
    But I feel kinda bad taking up NHS resources for what basically amounts to simple shyness. Admittedly it's got worse lately, but I know somebody who's on a 4 month waiting list for CBT who cuts himself a lot....


    I've had one session. It was more of a getting to know you kinda of thing, but even then it made me see things that I hadn't before. I came out of it quite hopeful, but days later I feel far worse than ever before.
    It's 2 weeks minimum between each session, and now that I've started the process I fell particularly vulnerable and emotionally raw, yet I haven't been given any of the tools that the therapist said she'll be teaching me to cope with it.
    I had a good cry last night. The few friends that I had have all drifted away, so I'm pretty much alone now.
    Ah well, onwards and upwards. The friends that have disappeared obviously weren't worth a damn anyway.
    Thanks everybody.

  • Stick with it lad,its not easy but youre taking positive steps to improve your life so hold on to that when the going gets tough.
    And dont feel bad,youre as deserving as anyone else.Good luck with it:hug: