money savings ideas

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  • with the gas and elec gone up now the waters going up too, the price of food is going up stupidly


    so i thought about starting a thread for idea's on saving money and helping each other get through the mad times of inflation. :eek:


    we are on a water meter, i have just applied to our water board to capp the cost to a certain amount each year, they only do this if you have more then 3 children and claim child benefit for them. or someone in your house hold has an illness where they need to use more water then normal


    every water board does this so its well worth looking into if you have a meter fitted. :)


    i do my grocery shopping online, i just get what i need and no ruffly how much i'm going to spend each week there's no temptations and no kids or hubby chucking stuff in the trolley :)


    i have stuck labels on every light swtich in my house " please turn me off"
    this is for the kids has they have a habbit of leaving every light on in my house, i got them to make the labels and they stuck them on to help drill it :)


    feel free to add your idea's

  • I have started making the effort to visit local markets on the weekend to buy fruit n veg in bulk as its much cheaper than at the supermarket....

    I keep an eye on 'special offers' at the supermarkets and buy stuff that will last e.g. boxes of cereal, tins etc...

    and I am now in the habit of always checking ebay first before buying new clothes, shoes, cds etc....

  • We turn all plugs off at the wall when not in use. We only turn the combi boiler on when we actually want some hot water n then it gets turned off again at the wall - it uses 10p in a blink of an eye just by firing up on its own every so often as all boilers do...


    We've just got rid of our gas guzzling 2 litre petrol engine motor and cashed the tax disc in.. we now walk everywhere or ask other people for a lift FOR A CHANGE LOL! :D


    We buy alot of raw ingredients and cook from scratch but rather than go to the supermarket on our own - today - me, lee's mum n lee's grandad are all goin in the same car to do the shopping thus saving money on fuel and potentially bulk buy some stuff between us.


    We shop around and try and support our local independant corner shop as much as possible for things like milk, tatties and bog roll.


    I use the greengrocer's in town as is always cheaper than the supermarket. Also use the weekly market.

  • I always check Ebay or charity shops before I buy something new, or see if there is something I can re-use, in fact thats where I get most of my clothes! I also sell stuff I no longer need on ebay.


    I go to local greengrocers or Farmers Markets for food, which can sometimes be a little more pricey but we don't get sucked into buying more than we need so costs less in the long run! If I do need to use a supermarket I'll go to Lidl as i prefer their Fruit and Veg to the other supermarkets and it's also cheaper. I also grow my own, this summer we've not had to buy any potatoes or tomatoes, and we've also got courgettes, peas, pumpkins, rocket, herbs, chillis, squash, apples and blackberrys! and I intend to plant some more veg that will grow at this time of year (sprouts, PakChoi, Squash etc)

  • i find lidls good for some clothes we had a winter puffa coat for our eldest for about £8,and hubby picked up a packet of 3 or 4 sleeveless tops for a fiver i think. in fact hubby says the charity shops round here are a rip off his clothes lead a hard life with dogs & boys jumping over him so he gets his trousers & padded shirts from raymonds they have stores in lydney and coleford in the forest,he paid just over a tenner for lightweight style trousers and under £15 for some regatta ones that dry out real quick and are really hard wearingcompared with denim jeans. t- shirts he gets from burtons sale about £2/5 a shirt and either peacocks or ethel austins in monmouth wales.

  • for clothes its ebay or charity shops


    for budget cooking ideas i use http://www.netmums.com/h/n/FOOD/HOME/ALL/266//



    i also use freecycle yoiu can get some good things on there


    i dont have a car so when i do go out we walk yey


    we only have a farmers market twice maybe 3 times a month if lucky
    i do find that they are alot more expensives then supermarkets. tho


    i tend to stay away from my corner shop unless its an emrgency
    4pts of milf £1.50 a loaf of bread is 1.25


    we dont have a green groceies :mad:

  • I sometimes use this site. It's not a llist of bargains (though there is a forum for passing on money saving tips and offers) but it provides good background info about how companies make money out of us and how to avoid it. For example, I have got my phone bill (for calls, excluding line rental) down to sometimes less than £1 per month as a result of some of the ideas on this site, without cutting back on call quantity or duration.

    The bloke who runs it, Martin Lewis, can be a bit ranty about stuff, but the site has no sponsors, adverts etc. and is a good place to start.

    http://www.moneysavingexpert.com/

  • i use there too and get the weekly email too


    Quote from Storm

    I sometimes use this site. It's not a llist of bargains (though there is a forum for passing on money saving tips and offers) but it provides good background info about how companies make money out of us and how to avoid it. For example, I have got my phone bill (for calls, excluding line rental) down to sometimes less than £1 per month as a result of some of the ideas on this site, without cutting back on call quantity or duration.

    The bloke who runs it, Martin Lewis, can be a bit ranty about stuff, but the site has no sponsors, adverts etc. and is a good place to start.

    http://www.moneysavingexpert.com/

  • An afterthought: The biggest way I actually saved money was to cycle to work instead of taking the bus. It got me fit again and saved £17.50 per week - £70 per month , which covered the cost of my water, gas and electric bills.




  • I used to only put the hot water on when i needed it and the engineer that come round to service the boiler told me that it costs you more in the end to keep firing it up.

  • Quote from Storm

    I sometimes use this site. It's not a llist of bargains (though there is a forum for passing on money saving tips and offers) but it provides good background info about how companies make money out of us and how to avoid it. For example, I have got my phone bill (for calls, excluding line rental) down to sometimes less than £1 per month as a result of some of the ideas on this site, without cutting back on call quantity or duration.

    The bloke who runs it, Martin Lewis, can be a bit ranty about stuff, but the site has no sponsors, adverts etc. and is a good place to start.

    http://www.moneysavingexpert.com/


    I read the forums on there, I like the green and ethical moneysaving board! I also got loads of tips last year for a cheaper Xmas as was out of work and couldn't afford a lot :(

  • I also use greasypalm for cashback links and quidco.

    http://www.greasypalm.co.uk

    https://www.quidco.com/

    they are especially handy when you are renewing insurances etc.

    This site http://www.loquax.co.uk/ is good for competitions and on their forums also lists loads of free samples. You don't get an awful lot of spam either as most of the sites have an opt out for emails. The comps are worth entering for the prizes for yourself or keep for gifts or sell them on.

    There is also a school uniform co op at my daughters school where parents give in their out grown stuff and you can buy it for a donation.

    Sure start also have lots going on in the holidays for free if there is one in the local area.

    If you have lots of supermarkets near you that deliver this site http://www.mysupermarket.co.uk/Home.aspx is great. You put in your list and then it tells you which site, ie, tesco, asda etc is cheapest and directs you to that site to order it all to be delivered.

    I also make my own shopping bags from old fabric and buy all my clothes and kids clothes mostly at boot sales.

    My best cheap food in the winter is by using a slow cooker - mine is big enough to make a meal for 4 and the same again for the freezer.

  • Quote from alices wonderland

    buy duty free tobacco and cigarettes in bulk... everyone knows a none smoker who goes abroad on holiday each year.


    or stop smoking ha ha haaaaaa

  • Quote from reggaegotsoul

    I used to only put the hot water on when i needed it and the engineer that come round to service the boiler told me that it costs you more in the end to keep firing it up.


    We actually costed this out Rachel - the other week when we was majorly skinted and had no money to get electric til the next day lol so we was watchin the meter like hawks and used it as an exercise to see what used what...Our boiler tends to fire up every 4 hours or so and especially through the night it seems more noticeable.. n everytime it does it, it seemed to rinse 10p off the meter...so at the moment we're only doin the washin up once a day and use the shower for hot water in the bathroom so the boiler only gets fired up once a day rather than being dormant and firing up for no reason...I think come the winter though it'd be more economical to leave it on cos the heating will be on then so i reckon you're engineer would be bang on the nail :D

  • Quote from HAPPYSMILEYCLAPPER



    I keep an eye on 'special offers' at the supermarkets and buy stuff that will last e.g. boxes of cereal, tins etc...
    ..

    What might appear to be a bargain may not in fact be so. In terms of nutrition with any breakfast cereal you get very little for your money. Tinned food is good for camping or travelling but can be expensive if we are talking about pulses such as lentils. The dried version is much better value for money. You might see window cleaner reduced in price but again compared to vinegar it is expensive.


    If you have the time, how about making your own bread.

  • I always found that by the time you had factored in the energy for cooking and the cost of materials, bread is one area where you only just break even - now flavour wise, home made wins hands down. we spent nearly a year baking our own bread, and if you go for the el cheapo stuff it costs less, if you compare to the shop baked stuff you can do it a tad cheaper.
    Grendel

  • Quote from Duckman

    What might appear to be a bargain may not in fact be so. In terms of nutrition with any breakfast cereal you get very little for your money. Tinned food is good for camping or travelling but can be expensive if we are talking about pulses such as lentils. The dried version is much better value for money. You might see window cleaner reduced in price but again compared to vinegar it is expensive.

    If you have the time, how about making your own bread.



    I agree with you re the dried pulses Duckman. :waves:

    However, the only tins I buy tend to be tinned tomatoes, which I find a good buy (until my own tomato plants take off that is!) as they are relatively cheap, convenient, and can be used as the basis for all kinds of meals....

    Cereal is good for me in the mornings as I have to get up really early for work and work FT, so need something light to line my tummy....:)

    I have tried bread making, haven't had too much success with it tbh, but might give it a go again sometime as the cost of bread now is extortionate!!!:thumbup:

  • we grow our own veg at moment i use natural cleaning products e.g. vinegar ect for a variety of things round the house. we use freecycle ebay and ive signed up to quidco which pays you back a percentage through shopping with them at various diff places. this is good as i shop alot online as i find it cheaper and easier than dragging 2 little kids round with me. i shop with offers i buy at wholesale things like washing powder. i buy in season and on saturday were off to netto for our shop coz asdas getting way over priced. i found a localish shop where i can get a big milk for 99p total bargain as aspose to 1.40 ish elsewhere.

  • I make any purchase I can through the cash back site pigsback.com


    I compare prices for baby essentials online to make sure Boots is the cheapest that month, then save the advantage card points.


    I have started diong the grocery shopping online, making a list first and sticking to it, then using Mysupermarket to compare the prices - Tesco is always cheaper for me. I then do an internet search for voucher codes and always find one for at least £10 (which more than covers cost of delivery so save petrol costs too). Also collect Tesco club card vouchers.


    I've switched expensive breakfast cereals to Tesco value oats = 2 weeks breakfast, for me and baby for 59p + cost of milk.


    Making home grown courgette and potato soup for lunch every day = almost free.


    Make a mince based meal once or twice a week and substitute half the meat for lentils (Shhh, don't tell my partner lol).


    Haven't worked out how to stop Other Half spending money we don't have yet :rolleyes:

  • Quote

    Make a mince based meal once or twice a week and substitute half the meat for lentils (Shhh, don't tell my partner lol).

    Thats a brilliant idea... what lentils do you use? I do kinda the same thing but use loads of vegetables and just a little meat.

  • i have a condenser dryer with the water that it collects i put it back in the drum of the washer it helps a little but probably not much


    i use mysupermarket.com too, not only do you get your clubcard vouchers but you also get ipoints too and therer are plenty of ways to collect more ipoints
    online on their website and other online stores too you can also do there servuys to earn more points its good way of saving for the dreaded christmas

  • Quote from Sarah

    Thats a brilliant idea... what lentils do you use? I do kinda the same thing but use loads of vegetables and just a little meat.


    I store my lentils and stuff in old coffee jars, so I use 1 lid full of green lentils and 1 lid full of red split peas per lb of mince (boiled for 20mins before adding to mince and veg) - doubles the portions and you really can't tell. If I'm cooking for myself I sometimes totally substitute the mince for lentils when making bolognaise (?sp).