Men don't "get" craft

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  • I was talking to mum about how dad never expresses any interest in anything I make and she said "Well men don't get craft do they? Their brains are differnt!" so it descended into an argument...


    but i thought I would come here and make sure.


    The majority of crafters I know are female.


    Are you a man who crafts?


    Are you a man who doesn't craft and why?


    Is it just not your bag?
    Do you feel pressured by sociaty not to?


    Is it because men "just don't get it" and it goes back to hunter gatherer times...which I think is bollocks as look at all the male hairdressers and chefs! Yet in art also....there are barely any blokes in the art department, the most male part of it is "graphics" is graphics a more blokey thing???


    Men are just as capable of making thigns as women....but they just don't want to..... I've had endless arguments with males who say crocheting etc looks interesting but they just won't do it because "it's for women"



    why is this female element attached to being creative???


    Surely we should be working to diffuse these gender patterns in arts and crafts??

  • Quote

    Surely we should be working to diffuse these gender patterns in arts and crafts??


    why? better to focus on the massive salary differences and glass ceilings in the workplace and anyhow, they would only try to out-do us......


    but seriously, men do craft ... blacksmithing, carving (wood, stone) - lots of men paint and do fashion design, wicker work


    crochet and knitting are gentile kinda occupations and men have bigger hands than us, so perhaps it's less easy.

  • Quote from colours of thewind


    why? better to focus on the massive salary differences and glass ceilings in the workplace and anyhow, they would only try to out-do us......


    but seriously, men do craft ... blacksmithing, carving (wood, stone) - lots of men paint and do fashion design, wicker work


    crochet and knitting are gentile kinda occupations and men have bigger hands than us, so perhaps it's less easy.


    But on the other hand so long as needlework is considered a female thing to do it will continue to be taken less seriously and patronised?

  • well ... my father-in-law knows how to sew. when his daughters were young he used to make their clothes. (he's a big burly, cockney, ex-boxer type).


    there are men that play in the NFL (National Football League - and that's American Football) who are known to do needlework as it's calming (remember being told this when i was younger.


    my hubby draws (though insists he's not good at it --- he is), works on models, and typically alltogether enjoys all the things I make. :D

  • Quote from phoenix_indigo

    well ... my father-in-law knows how to sew. when his daughters were young he used to make their clothes. (he's a big burly, cockney, ex-boxer type).


    there are men that play in the NFL (National Football League - and that's American Football) who are known to do needlework as it's calming (remember being told this when i was younger.


    my hubby draws (though insists he's not good at it --- he is), works on models, and typically alltogether enjoys all the things I make. :D


    That's good to hear!


    RE: blacksmithing, basket making etc etc....they do seem to get overlooked as crafts...it remidns me of at school there as a big division between deisgn technology and art when they were both effectively "making things"


    I just don't see why art/craft is not a masculine thing to do? I guess the more mascinline considered that people have mentioned such as the blacksmithing are things with big ol' tools so more "acceptable"?

  • Men do craft. Actually I think it is a socially constructed attitude that needlework is a female thing to do. If you put some thought into it there are a number of needlework crafts that have been traditionally a male domain. A good example of this would be tayloring.


    I am a man who crafts, I like doing it as it is a way of being able to express my creative side to produce something beautiful. I think boys don't generally pick up needlework type crafts as they have a pressure to appear more masculine to their peers, anything that questions this makes them feel as if they are a sissy boy. I think this creates a vicious cycle which makes most men reluctant to try percieved female type activities.


    Men are more likely to do crafts that are percieved more masculine, like for instance woodwork.


    Just to turn things on their heads a bit, how many females would do crafts such as metal work or wood work? It can be as fun and relaxing as knitting or crochet, and at the end of it you can have something that is useful and you can enjoy.



    Matt

  • Ach, not this argument again. Same thing as all women are this and all men are that. Live together in our own goods and bads.....

    "Going to Starbucks for coffee is like going to prison for sex. You know you're going to get it, but it's going to be rough."

  • my dad takes pride in cookery and he used to knit as well, my cousin wanted to do fashion design, but he went for cookery instead in the end. my boyfriend loves crafty stuff, i made him a massive craft box of things for last christmas. my brother likes making models of stuff, and he likes fimo as well.

  • Quote from SithInKnots

    The first thing I think of when I see a big guy knitting, is that he probably did time. Now there's a bit of a wacky stereotype.


    ha ha .. where do you think my father in law learned how to sew ;)

  • I am a wicked cook. All foods, Omni/veggie/vegan. Way i see it, cookings a craft...

    "Going to Starbucks for coffee is like going to prison for sex. You know you're going to get it, but it's going to be rough."

  • Quote from Perthite

    my dad does loads of craft stuff when he's not being a doctor!


    My dad's a doctor too, and does some very good drawings in his spare time. I've wondered if his gift is enhanced by a good knowledge of anatomy. He's also an excellent cook and has lately made being the most pedantic person in the world into a sort of craft.

  • My Husband likes art, cooking and on many occasions has hand made me cards for my birthday etc.


    My Dad has never once bought my Mum a greetings card, every one she's ever had off him have been made by himself which is pretty good going in 29 years!

  • I always find gender orientated stereotypes really interesting. Take horseriding for example - the majority of people on the horse courses at college are females, and yet there are loads of professional male riders out there! I reckon they do it in secret...

    I know some blokes who are wonderful craftsmen with wood and really intricate stuff... My grandad makes the most beautiful things out of wood and the most amazing dolls houses i've ever known. I also recently saw some cushions my great grandad knitted, with beautiful designs of birds knitted into them too.

  • I cook, garden, sculpt and write music. Any of those count?

    Oh woe is me, oh woe is me, I used to have a hamster tree.


    But it was eaten by a newt, and now I have no cuddly fruit,


    Oh woe is me!

  • Quote from Lister D

    Ach, not this argument again. Same thing as all women are this and all men are that. Live together in our own goods and bads.....


    Hear hear, i agree with that, we're all good (and sometimes bad) at the same things, it's just whether people apply themselves to it

    ----------------------
    "People who give up their freedom for temporary security deserve neither and will lose both" - Benjamin Franklin
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  • Charlie does cross stitch of his own free will - i can't stand it meself bores me shitless but me boy spends hours when he in the mood for it :)
    My Dad is the most creative person I know.. he's a wonderful multi-media artist, makes beautiful furniture and other items from wood.


    I sorry annie but I think ya mum is talkin bollocks :lol:

  • I dont think men dont "get" craft, I just think their idea of craft is different to ours.
    My tech teacher used to panel beat his own parts for his cars, a guy I know carves logs using chainsaws into animals and garden sculptures. My Grandad makes model engines from scrap brass and metals, and runs them with compressed air.
    I would say all of these are crafts, although they may be different to what you call crafts, ie knitting, candle making, etc.

  • Quote from Barefoot_Surfer


    Just to turn things on their heads a bit, how many females would do crafts such as metal work or wood work? It can be as fun and relaxing as knitting or crochet, and at the end of it you can have something that is useful and you can enjoy.


    Matt


    I used to do wood work, indeed, when I told my old boss where to stick his job I was the best bit of a way through making a 1/2 size solid oak and mahogany telecaster guitar!:D
    Also in my spare time, I used to help my Dad restore Stationary Engines, classic cars, militery vehicals, steam rollers, etc, etc...
    I was brought up this way, wearing a boilersuit since I was 3!!! lol

  • I think it's worth remembering that over time different crafts can move from being male to female dominated and vice versa.

    I'm sure I remember reading that knitting was predominately a male craft in Europe in times gone past and I know that sailors and fisherman had their own traditional patterns for sweaters.

    One of my best friends is a blacksmith and he says that over the last twenty years there are more and more women moving into the profession.

  • Quote from Sunny

    I always find gender orientated stereotypes really interesting. Take horseriding for example - the majority of people on the horse courses at college are females, and yet there are loads of professional male riders out there! I reckon they do it in secret...


    Yet here in Spain, it's seen as such a macho thing that the word on the mens toilets is 'Caballero' (Horse Rider). When I see a horse, nine of ten times at least, the rider is male.


    I used to do knitting as a kid, in later years made wooden badges to sell at festivals. Often did screen printing, but that was more a practical thing - making event posters..


    When I was busking I used to do plenty of crafts - making these circuit boards for the 'busking machine'..but the visual art was incidental of course..it was making 'tools' for the music show.

  • My Nan showed me how to knit when i was younger
    Most of the guys i work with on building site work away from home and most of them can sew and cook and I know of some builder who worked in the Falklands after the war that took up Knitting (mainly hats and scarfs)
    so yes men can do crafts

  • I have done and still do crafts, my dad used to do embroidery in the navy, my uncle was one of the top cross stitchers in the country, he used to raise a fortune doing charity cross stich pictures - he learned that when he was in the navy.
    I can drop spin, wheel spin, weave sew, Nailbind (a archaic form of knitting, but great for socks and hats.) woodwork, metalwork, model making (my latest was a 1/12 scale telescope). I consider telescope construction a craft, I maintain all my own vehicles, can strip a computer and rebuild it, same with a digital or film camera.
    Add to that my profession as a draughtsman, I can also draw up anything I can pull to bits, No I dont think crafts are something just for the females amongst us, I also dont allow any stigma of craft doing to stop me doing it either, I am quite prepared to sit down and do some sewing whilst sitting on a train or in a park, well anywhere its practical really.
    Grendel

  • Quote from moominmamma


    I'm sure I remember reading that knitting was predominately a male craft in Europe in times gone past and I know that sailors and fisherman had their own traditional patterns for sweaters.
    .


    And in some parts of the world today fishermen use crochet to fix their nets. :)

  • my dad was brilliant with wood
    he had a garage kitted out with a lathe and chisels etc
    he made most of his furniture
    he made walking sticks out of branches and carved animals out of wood
    i remember about 12 years ago the yo- yo craze taking off and dad made all the kids on my street yo-yos out of wood the kids called them pro-yo-wood and painted their own design on them