Chocolate addiction??

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  • Quote from helicopter

    And how do you therefore distinguish that from lets say an addiction to bike riding or reading Harry Potter books?

    Addictions are habits that you have difficulty controlling. I dunno about anyone else, but I don't consider myself psychologically addicted to my hobbies. If any of them were harming me, I could walk away from them in a heartbeat.

  • Quote from helicopter

    And how do you therefore distinguish that from lets say an addiction to bike riding or reading Harry Potter books?


    Behavioural addiction has in fact many similarities to chemical addiction - this is the concensus of researchers into addictions, especially the Behavioural Addiction research lab at Berlins Charite Medical University and the Psychologist Mark Griffiths, an addictions specialist of Nottingham Trent University.


    They all agree there is little difference between whats going on in the heads of addicts, from gambling to crack. Mark Griffiths said, in an article in New Scientist in 2006 "gamblers have withdrawl symptoms just like drug addicts do"
    Patients at Charite have withdrawl symptoms such as anxiety, depression, sweating and hallucinations, caused by withdrawl from shopping and gambling.


    The effect of excess behaviours and chemicals in the brain are similar in that they both trigger Dophamine release in the neucleus accumbens and the Frontal Lobe area, the "reward circuits" of the brain.


    And yes, sugar can be extremely addictive, bringing on serious highs and lows, with the same withdrawl symptoms as other drugs. These researchers mentioned above have acknowleged this and Princetown University studies have conclusive evidence of this.


    Go on Helicopter, give up chocolate and all sugar for a couple of weeks.;)..

  • Quote

    Addictions are habits that you have difficulty controlling. I dunno about anyone else, but I don't consider myself psychologically addicted to my hobbies. If any of them were harming me, I could walk away from them in a heartbeat.

    Okay okay, I know that what youre saying is wrong because nothing is classed as an addiction if it is purely psychological. Its a neurosis. A lot of people, including me, used to be addicted to nicotine, but it certainly didnt dictate who I was. Yes if I didnt have a cigarette I would climb the walls till I got nicotine but it certainly wasnt an addiction that defined me like crack cocaine defines the person who is addicted to it. It was nevertheless an addiction. Comparably, when have you ever heard of a chocolate addict anywhere in the world that needed chocolate patches to get off the stuff ?


    Quote

    Go on Helicopter, give up chocolate and all sugar for a couple of weeks.

    what a nice challenge, oh and your last contribution is the most compelling so far that may be making my case show a few micro stress marks, but I beat you to the challenge. I havent had a bar of chocolate for about 3 months and my sugar intake is about 4 teaspoons a day in tea and as little as possible in other foods - maybe the odd mcvities digestive

    Quote


    They all agree there is little difference between whats going on in the heads of addicts, from gambling to crack. Mark Griffiths said, in an article in New Scientist in 2006 "gamblers have withdrawl symptoms just like drug addicts do"
    Patients at Charite have withdrawl symptoms such as anxiety, depression, sweating and hallucinations, caused by withdrawl from shopping and gambling.

    Food for thought, made by Cadbury's perhaps?


    Which leads me to another point. In the EU Cadburys and other similar British manufacturers of "street chocolate", just to differentiate it from more refined varieties, were almost banned from defining their products as chocolate. They use only vegetable oil while real chocolate uses the cocoa butter. The person who is addicted would therefore have to show whether they were addicted to chocolate or its British namesake


    http://www.guardian.co.uk/uk/2003/jan/17/foodanddrink


    Quote

    However, the court put the issue of what really constitutes chocolate to bed once and for all. It said: "The characteristic element of all products bearing the name chocolate is the presence of a certain minimum cocoa and cocoa butter content. (But) the addition of vegetable fats does not substantially alter the nature of those products." Making it clear in or near the list of ingredients that British chocolate does contain vegetable fat was more than enough to inform consumers, it added.

    so where most chocolate is between 70% and 100% cocoa product, British chocolate is somewhere around 3% to 10%

  • Quote

    Okay okay, I know that what youre saying is wrong because nothing is classed as an addiction if it is purely psychological.


    Well a gambling addiction is an addiction and is recognised yet there is nothing physical about that.

  • Quote from helicopter

    O I havent had a bar of chocolate for about 3 months and my sugar intake is about 4 teaspoons a day in tea and as little as possible in other foods - maybe the odd mcvities digestive
    Food for thought, made by Cadbury's perhaps?



    id like to challange this actually as i DID drop all sugar from my diet for two and a half weeks, and im about to go through it again to a lighter extreeme. Now no sugar means:


    no sugar, all types: brown, white, syrup, molasses, honey, fructose, lactose, maltose, dextrose etc so thats a no glycemic diet. Within these catagories are all fruits (bananas are the highest glycemic you can generally get and rasins too) so thats no musli, no fruit and nut bars, no fruit juices etc (especial squash juices) no jams and most spreads you can buy. All starches so potatoes are an complete no no. so thats no crisps! no chips, no hash browns, no pasties, most stews and soups etc etc.


    No pastries as these all contain sugar.


    no fermented products, vinegar, pickles, chutney, soya sauce, alcohol. as to ferment you need sugar. so no drinking alcohol this included things like Olives as they are stored in vinegar.


    Nearly all cerials have sugar in, even natural whole grain ones and ones you buy from organic super markets.


    Obviously no things like sweets, cakes, flap jacks etc etc but thats a given. and no fizzy drinks either... so the only thing you can buy from a store is water (non flavoured)


    Lots of white bread have sugar in them or have a glycemic level so they become sugar in the body.


    No beetroot, no parsnips, no honey, salad dressings.


    Only complex carbs really like lentils, as other carbs turn into sugar very quickly in your body.








    ...now tell me again how much sugar do you eat?

  • Quote from helicopter


    so where most chocolate is between 70% and 100% cocoa product, British chocolate is somewhere around 3% to 10%


    then again thats 70 - 100% cocoa not cacao ...which if i am correct is the un processed version of Coco... so are we talking about being addicted to cacao? or coco? or "chocolate"? because if we are talking about the pure ingreediant which chocolate is created from then its cacao... and i know a few raw foodists who eat an incredibly unhealthy amount of it because of the high they get (even a small amount of it makes me feel like im on a light dose of non visual shrooms)... and when they dont eat it? a come down. im not sure if this is classed as a physical addiction but if a substance has a physcological effect on someone and is habbit forming then it can also become phycologicaly addictive ...

  • Quote from helicopter

    well not really I suppose not, I think theres something wrong with calling something an addiction if its psychological.



    what about gambling thats a psychological addiction
    and its very real believe me it destroys lives

    Many find chocolate irresistible - including myself. We crave chocolate, we savor it, and we enjoy it. There comes the passion for chocolate - or rather the chocolate addiction.


    What is the chemistry inherent in this passion or addiction? How does it make so many of us become addicted to chocolate?


    The reason is simple: chocolate is an addicting drug. Scientists have found that naloxone, an opiate blocker, reduces chocolate addiction. This is strong evidence that chocolate is addictive, just like any other drug. However, chocolate is only a mild version of addicting drug - but enough to have the brain effect that creates the real, compulsive attraction.


    In addition to caffeine (although not nearly as much as coffee), chocolate contains other chemicals, such as theobromine, phenylethylamine, that create marijuana-like effect on the brain. Such chemical effect of chocolate on the brain is significant and substantial, especially when the chocolate seduction is reinforced by the smell, taste, and texture of chocolate.


    But the chocolate industry would like us to believe that chocolate is good for our health.


    Chocolate is good for you because it comes from a fruit tree, which contains antioxidants with beneficial heart benefits, especially dark chocolate. According to the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, chocolate reduces your body's absorption of fat. In addition, chocolate contains flavonoids more potent than vitamin C in reducing your bad cholesterol.


    But, is chocolate really healthy for you?


    The truth of the matter is that if you absolutely love chocolate, you would like to believe anything - especially what you want to believe.


    Firstly, most scientific studies on the health of chocolate are funded by the industry - a valid reason to take every positive finding with a grain of salt.


    Chocolate is made from cocoa beans from a fruit tree. Almost all plants contain antioxidants. If you really love antioxidants, then go for vegetables and fruits, not necessarily chocolate. The problem with chocolate is that coca beans are so bitter that loads of fat and sugar are added to make chocolate taste good and sweet. As a result, chocolate is loaded with calories, sixty percent of which come from fat, which contributes to cholesterol increase and weight gain. One ounce of chocolate contains as much as one-hundred-fifty calories with forty to fifty percent fat. M&M semisweet baking chocolate contains a whopping almost four hundred calories, over ten grams of saturated fat and more than forty grams of sugar! Do you honestly think these ingredients are healthy for you?


    In addition, chocolate, which contains caffeine, not only irritates your kidneys and thins your blood, but also changes your mood.


    Chocolate is unhealthy due to its unhealthy ingredients, which may cause headaches, obesity, heartburn, and emotional problems. If you must eat chocolate occasionally, go for quality ones, not the cheap ones which are mostly sugar, trans fats, artificial colorings, flavorings, and preservatives. Read the label! Watch out for additives and added fats! Or simply resist the chocolate temptation, if you can!


    Eat chocolate just because you like it, and not because it is healthy!


    If chocolate does not make you any healthier, does it make you happier?


    A study of self-confessed chocolate addicts found that chocolate could give them a sense of contentment. However, the pleasure was accompanied by a sense of guilt, which could trigger an eating disorder. Worse, chocolate cravings were not driven by hunger: they binged on chocolate even when they were full.


    If you crave chocolate only occasionally, you need not be overtly concerned. However, if you binge on chocolate, it could spell trouble down the road. Chocolate can do a lot more than just packing on the pounds if the addiction intensifies. The addictive effects differ from one person to the next. So it is of paramount importance that you pay attention to how chocolate affects your mood.

  • chocolate has been a big problem for me for a long long time.
    Id say it used to be an addiction, but I have more control over it now. Id get days when i would have no energy and be a complete moody bitch till I had some, headaches and dizziness, not nice :-/



    Iv really tried to cut down the sugar,but I still have a long long way to go

  • Quote from phoenix_indigo

    i still don't think it's going to be as dangerous as crack. :eek:

    have you seen crackheads?

    don't much think anyone addicted to chocolate is going to wander the streets at all hours asking for 20p "to use the phone" just so they can hopefully scrounge up enough to go buy a dairy milk bar.



    I have actually used crack for a while , when I was younger , about15 years ago , the chocolate still gets me though.

  • I am having more problems stopping eating chocolate than I did stopping smoking after 23 years.

    I have also known of a fair few people with serious issues regarding various foods, and food in general. I would say that the guy is in no way silly to compare his chocolate problem to alcohol.

  • The thing is, though, that however much chocolate you regularly ate, you *could* always just say "Right, no more" and stop. Just like that. It would take a lot of willpower, and you may get withdrawal headaches but you certainly won't die.


    If you have been an alcoholic for a comparable time you can't just stop. If you just suddenly stop drinking, you will die. Because your body becomes physcially dependant on it. I don't believe that is the case for chocolate.


    I am not suggesting the man's an idiot for admitting to being addicted to chocolate. But I did - and still do - find it a bit ridiculous that he seemed to think it was the same as a drug or alcohol addiction.


    And RE: doctors' advice... it's not like they can put you in a treatment programme to help you stop eating chocolate. What else can they do but say "Stop eating it"? Am I being ignorant here?

  • Well i think cholocate in itself might not be too detrimental to your body (except of course the build up of fatty tissues in your arteries causeing heart problems, and weight problems and of course the amount of sugar which can lead to dental problems and also things like desensitising your system so your constantly on a sugar high and very unaware of the true problems in your body) theres other issues which can arrise from the chocolate. (though im not talking aout only chocolate but for me i think chocolate plyed a big part in my gut problems)


    The sugar in it is what feeds the bad bacteria in your guts. this can build up and grow (again im on about candida here but i think may people underestimate its effects on the body putting it aside as just thrush) it begins as a spore then becomes a fungus which releases mycelia out through the gut walls and into the blood stream. This weakens the gut walls making you suseptable to things like allergies (not only food but pollutive, pollen, and chemicals even things like gas cookers)


    the list of some of the things seen to be caused by candida are:
    sin conditions (athletes foot, exthma, psoriasis, ringworm, rashes, itching etc)
    digestive conditions obviously (abdominal pains and dioreah or constapation, IBS, food sensitivity, general pains throughout the igestive tracts (from rashes in the mouth to indegestion and gas to rectal irritation.
    reproductive problems vaginal burning itching etc (thrush), endometriosis, infertility, intence period pains etc etc impotence etc. (n aside note these are extreeme not only from my own experiance but my sister in law was tod she could never have children because her falopian tubes and reproductive als had been so damaged by candida and when she did give birth she lost 4 pints of blood and almost died because of it
    Urinary tract burning, frequent peeing
    conditions of eyes and respiratory sore throats, bronchitis, asthma, erratic vission, ear pains, dizzyness, sinusitis etc etc
    joints and nerves aches, weaknesses, burning tingling etc
    Mind fatigue, lethargy (ME is thought to be caused by it) depression, anxiety, feeling spacey, irritablitiy, panick attacks, mood swings, etc etc (this list goes on and on)
    poor circulation


    Shakiness or irritability when hungry


    body odor which is not relieved when washed


    now you might not think many of these are that bad but when you have a ix of a lot of them its horrible. and you might think "well what has this got to do with what i said?" well it becomes a physical addiction as the candida craves the sugar so as long as its living in your gut to anything more than its normal regular amout then you will receive extreeme cravings for it.


    When you give up sugar you will get withdrawal symptoms, i was very ill for over a week and was so spacey i couldnt remember walking places nd often slept for a whole day at a time etc etc so often its really damn hard not to have a chocolate bar... and if you DONT know about candida... you dont have any excuse not to pick one up because often it makes you feel better.


    and as for the bodies dependancy i dont think it becomes dependant but what happens is the whole body becomes weekened so your imune system is completely shot which can be fatal (as any one with a severe allergy will know) also the candida released 79 known poisons in the body when alive and even more when its dieing (hence the horrible die off effets when you detox)


    and heres a little quote from the book "beat candida cookbook" by erica white
    "The first major cause of the probem is the amount of sugar we all eat... In so-called civalised countries today we eat so much sugar that each person is reckoned to consume roughly his own body weight in sugar every year, whereas 100 years ago we only ate 10 pounds of sugar in a year! in fact our bodies need no added sugar at all for energy or health, apart from the natural sugars found in fruits, vegetables, grains, so this vast amount of surplus sugar is encouraging the yeast in our bodies to thrive, among many other harmful effects ... in bottles of fizzy brink; one well known brand has the equivalent of 22 spoons of sugar in every bottle."


    So whats to say the guy didnt have a candida overgrowth that he doesnt know about (as many doctors refuse to beleive its existance unless you have hiv or are on chemo therapy) i think something like 8 out of 10 americans suffer from candida without knowing. (accordng to some person somewhere)


    Quote from princesstigermouse

    And RE: doctors' advice... it's not like they can put you in a treatment programme to help you stop eating chocolate. What else can they do but say "Stop eating it"? Am I being ignorant here?



    as for this point there are certain nutritional supplements you can take which help to reduce your sweet tooth making chocolate less appealing.

  • Yes, I am sure candida is a really huge problem and I can well believe that it affects many more people than realise it. I don't have any personal experience but I feel happy to take your word for it.


    I am totally not dismissing the horrible withdrawal symptoms, but still... it's not life-and-death in the way that it certainly can be with alcohol and possibly other drugs... but alcohol is the only one I have any personal knowledge of so I'll not try and talk about something I don't fully understand.


    I didn't know you could get supplements to reduce your sweet tooth... that's interesting.


    I eat a lot of chocolate and sweet things, because I like them, but I do know that a few years ago I cut out chocolate and all refined sugars completely, and apart from feeling pretty rough for around 10 days, I didn't find it hard at all. In fact, once those first ten days were over, I didn't even miss it. I went back to eating those things because I didn't really see why not, though since I have been pregnant I have cut back a lot. I think different people must react to these things differently... when I tried to give up dairy, for example, I felt like crap for months. But I don't think that was an addiction issue, I think my body just wasn't able to get the nutrients it needed from non-dairy substitutes.

  • Quote from princesstigermouse

    . I think different people must react to these things differently... when I tried to give up dairy, for example, I felt like crap for months. But I don't think that was an addiction issue, I think my body just wasn't able to get the nutrients it needed from non-dairy substitutes.



    just a note thats actually a sign of having an intollerence to a food. it might sound stupid but apparently (according to this book) "we frequently become addicted to the very foods which our immune systems have difficulty tolerating." Just thought i should let you know incase you want to look into it :)

  • Yeah, I heard that too. I used to think I was dairy intolerant, which was a big reason why I tried to become vegan, and I have been wheat intolerant in the past (it comes and goes, which a lot of people have told me is impossible, but it's true) I looked into it as I have suffered with ME and dairy intolerance can be a trigger for it... it turned out I wasn't, but I think eating loads of dairy does clog me up a bit, which my doctor says is techincally true of everyone - just more noticable in some people than others. I reckon it's all about balance for me.