Seen a rare bird or other rare species?

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  • Have you spotted a rare bird or other rare species?


    I was on the Romney- Dymchurch- Hythe (narrow gauge) railway the other day and about mile out of Hythe on the right ere quite a few spoonbills.BTW anyone know what the collective noun is for spoonbills?

  • Not that rare, but red listed - we get yellow hammers coming into our garden. The most I've seen is four but more often it's just one or two. The males are an incredibly bright yellow.

  • Woodpeckers are rare to see ...their usually high up on the trunks hammering away. Not sure if their rare...but spotting them is hard.

  • Quote from scothippy

    Woodpeckers are rare to see ...their usually high up on the trunks hammering away. Not sure if their rare...but spotting them is hard.



    Certainly in the south both green + great-spotted woodpeckers are increasingly common, even in large urban parks, whereas lesser spotted woodpeckers have declined + are a good, rareish sighting. Green woodpeckers are often seen on the ground on turf + especially around ant hills as ants are a major food item.

    I've been lucky to see a lot of rare wildlife both in UK + around world over the years as it's one of my great passions. Seeing tigers in India was a real highlight.

  • Great spotteds are fairly common but not always easy to see - spend most of their time up in trees (funny that...)
    Green Woodpeckers are pretty common & you see them a lot more - usually flying (usually preceeded by loud squawking...)


    Lesser spotted's are much smaller than greats (surprisingly...) about the size of a sparrow or robin & don't have the red arse of the GSW - see pic below: (This is not one of mine btw - I wish...) GSW for comparison is in the Birds thread in camera club
    Both LSW & GSW males have a red patch on the head


  • Quote from bikebodger


    Lesser spotted's are much smaller than greats (surprisingly...) about the size of a sparrow or robin & don't have the red arse of the GSW - see pic below: (This is not one of mine btw - I wish...) GSW for comparison is in the Birds thread in camera club



    That's the one I saw :)

  • I should get out more, living in a city the only wildlife I get to see are foxes and seagulls. I saw Frank Beard in a bar once, He's rare because he's the only member of ZZ Top that doesn't have a beard.

  • Don't know how rare they are but I saw a line of Red Kites hovering along the edge of a field beside the M40 when I was in Oxfordshire a couple of weeks ago.

    Rare or not they were impressive to watch - massive wing spans.

  • Quote from Pedro1979

    Don't know how rare they are but I saw a line of Red Kites hovering along the edge of a field beside the M40 when I was in Oxfordshire a couple of weeks ago.

    Rare or not they were impressive to watch - massive wing spans.



    They are magnificent birds. They are pretty common now in the Chilterns + can be seen in good numbers along A40 in that area. One of the most successful re-introduction schemes ever, considering the native population was down to just a handful of these birds in mid-Wales. It's good the're gracing our skies again, though some of the Scottish birds have been illegally poisoned.

  • Quote from princesstigermouse

    That's the one I saw :)




    you LUCKY girl, i have been looking for YEARS to see a lesser. i have heard so much but never seen.
    they tend to go around with the tit flocks in the winter btw.

    Only after the last tree has been cut down, Only after the last river has been poisoned, Only after the last fish has been caught, Only then will you find that money cannot be eaten.


  • Quote from Duckman

    Have you spotted a rare bird or other rare species?

    I was on the Romney- Dymchurch- Hythe (narrow gauge) railway the other day and about mile out of Hythe on the right ere quite a few spoonbills.BTW anyone know what the collective noun is for spoonbills?



    i was at Radipole RSPB reserve in weymouth dorset 2 weeks ago and was told "quick theres a FAB veiw of a bittern at the hide, its been there all day and people have even been showing us photos theve been taking of it" we rushed up there and didnt see it -GUTTED to say the least.
    saw lots of other lovely birds but it was a disapointment!!!

    RSPB Arne (near wareham) in Dorset - ive seen spoonbills there - FANTASTIC!!

    Only after the last tree has been cut down, Only after the last river has been poisoned, Only after the last fish has been caught, Only then will you find that money cannot be eaten.


  • Quote from rainbowgirl

    you LUCKY girl, i have been looking for YEARS to see a lesser. i have heard so much but never seen.
    they tend to go around with the tit flocks in the winter btw.



    Now is the best time to seek a lesser spot as the trees have no leaves still + they should be marking their territory by drumming + calling.

    I haven't seen one for c3 years now even though they do occur not to far away. Elusive blighters!:)

  • Woodpeckers are rare to see ...their usually high up on the trunks hammering away. Not sure if their rare...but spotting them is hard.


    Funny thing is that when I lived in the countryside I saw maybe 1 woodpecker in 10 years and now i moved to london I regularly see them in the garden. In north and south london

  • Quote from helicopter

    Woodpeckers are rare to see ...their usually high up on the trunks hammering away. Not sure if their rare...but spotting them is hard.

    Funny thing is that when I lived in the countryside I saw maybe 1 woodpecker in 10 years and now i moved to london I regularly see them in the garden. In north and south london



    If you recognise their calls the 2 commoner species are easy to see- I can see several in a day + green woodpeckers are more normally seen near/on the ground.

  • My partner & I think we may have seen a Golden Eagle a few weeks ago in the Dumfries & Galloway area (where we live). It was too big for the other birds of prey round here & when we looked it up the markings & flight pattern appeared to be that of a Golden Eagle.


    (Oh, we have heavy snow here this morning.....4th time since Jan 1st.)

  • Quote from Nos1959

    My partner & I think we may have seen a Golden Eagle a few weeks ago in the Dumfries & Galloway area (where we live). It was too big for the other birds of prey round here & when we looked it up the markings & flight pattern appeared to be that of a Golden Eagle.

    (Oh, we have heavy snow here this morning.....4th time since Jan 1st.)



    Quite likely; saw my very first goldie there many years ago. Have seen a few more since- magnificent raptors!

  • Quote from gomphus

    Now is the best time to seek a lesser spot as the trees have no leaves still + they should be marking their territory by drumming + calling.

    I haven't seen one for c3 years now even though they do occur not to far away. Elusive blighters!:)



    yep elusive very frustrating !

    Only after the last tree has been cut down, Only after the last river has been poisoned, Only after the last fish has been caught, Only then will you find that money cannot be eaten.


  • Quote from helicopter

    Woodpeckers are rare to see ...their usually high up on the trunks hammering away. Not sure if their rare...but spotting them is hard.

    Funny thing is that when I lived in the countryside I saw maybe 1 woodpecker in 10 years and now i moved to london I regularly see them in the garden. In north and south london



    i see great spotted woodies everywhere round here, they even used to come to my bird feedeer in my old place.
    i am lucky enuf to see em on the trees from my front room but no lesser ahhhh!

    Only after the last tree has been cut down, Only after the last river has been poisoned, Only after the last fish has been caught, Only then will you find that money cannot be eaten.


  • Quote from Nos1959

    My partner & I think we may have seen a Golden Eagle a few weeks ago in the Dumfries & Galloway area (where we live). It was too big for the other birds of prey round here & when we looked it up the markings & flight pattern appeared to be that of a Golden Eagle.

    (Oh, we have heavy snow here this morning.....4th time since Jan 1st.)



    WOW fantastic

    Only after the last tree has been cut down, Only after the last river has been poisoned, Only after the last fish has been caught, Only then will you find that money cannot be eaten.


  • we were gettin hoopoes down the sbbo at sandwich bay in my far distant youth...are they still a rare visitor or have they slipped off the twitchers must see lists by now???

    'I disapprove of what you say, but I will
    defend to the death your right to say it'
    Evelyn Beatrice Hall, The Friends Of Voltaire, 1906.

  • Quote from rainbowgirl

    you LUCKY girl, i have been looking for YEARS to see a lesser. i have heard so much but never seen.


    My mum lives in a rural (nice!) bit of Basingstoke and sees them all the time... or possibly the same one over and over, more likely :D

  • Not really rare but just wanted to share, I saw the most beautiful Kingfisher the other day, The colours were that bright and amazing I didn't believe it was real until I got a bit closer, I know they are beautiful birds anyway but this one was outstanding, Unfortunately I wasn't quick enough to get a picture :mad:

  • we had one of these pecking grubs out of our lawn the other day..theres a mill pond behind our house and we get more than our fair share of birds.. last week there were 10 guinea fowl in the trees, we have seen a heron have lunch, and there's always kites around.. I love watching them, their areobatics are awesome..

  • I got to see two (difference occasions) bald eagles on a visit to Cape Breton. I believe it's no longer on the endagered species list though. Which is good on one had but makes you wonder if they would have been so egerly repopulated if they weren't the big nationalistic symbol of our neighbours to the south.

  • Quote from ratty

    we were gettin hoopoes down the sbbo at sandwich bay in my far distant youth...are they still a rare visitor or have they slipped off the twitchers must see lists by now???



    Still an annual visitor, so not a common bird, but most twitchers who chase rarities will have seen one. About 5 years ago a pair bred in Wales, but following year only 1 returned. Stunning birds-I've seen a few in UK + more overseas.

  • Quote from claireaitchbee

    we had one of these pecking grubs out of our lawn the other day..theres a mill pond behind our house and we get more than our fair share of birds.. last week there were 10 guinea fowl in the trees, we have seen a heron have lunch, and there's always kites around.. I love watching them, their areobatics are awesome..



    Stunning photo of a male green woodpecker. Where did the guinea fowl come from?

  • Quote from SithInKnots

    I got to see two (difference occasions) bald eagles on a visit to Cape Breton. I believe it's no longer on the endagered species list though. Which is good on one had but makes you wonder if they would have been so egerly repopulated if they weren't the big nationalistic symbol of our neighbours to the south.



    Agree they are awesome- I was so excited when I saw my first baldie. It's good news that they are doing so well now.

  • Sorry, a bit of a delayed response.. but the red kites on the M40 - they're part of a really successfull RSPB breeding programme. Kites were nearly extinct in the UK, and some breeding stock was brought over from germany.
    Red kites were the one of the first birds to get a protection order in the Uk, in medieval times! - for their service to king and country, for eating the litter on the streets in london. When people started managing their waste better, the birds moved into the countryside, and got persecuted by farmers, leading to their near extinction.
    The M40 strip is ace for spotting them. You can see over 60 on your way down to London (if you're not the driver!)

    (Sorry folks, bit of a bird fan, and red kites are a new favourate!)

    Happy Birding,

    EmRed