Ban on cars?

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  • Quote from shibari.surfer

    Thats true but am i right in thinking that that has happened during my life time(i,e in the last 30years or so)?

    I believe so, yes. When I was growing up in Liverpool, I hardly knew anyone who had a car. Granted, the city was very deprived, but I still think it reflects a wider social reality. Out-of-town shopping didn't exist, jobs were local, cinemas and other forms of entertainment were located locally or within easy reach of public transport, public transport was more widespread and cheaper.....

  • Quote from Coyote

    Most people also think "they have some kind of right to" have kids "without thinking of the short and long term effects on the environment"....:whistle:


    Fair point...but I have no plans to cause further environmental damage by having another...and the one i do have is fully trained in the walking/using public transport, getting involved with recycling/composting....and is also an active member of a wildlife group...so she's pretty environmentally sound! :)




    Quote from coyote

    Most cities are heavily congested whilst most rural places rely on private transport and seldom are congested (except when townies decide to do the tourist thing in "quaint" countryside...). The issue is not the practice (of driving cars) but rather the population numbers - but hey thats the kind of issue no body dares address for fear of being called a "nazi".:rolleyes:


    Tis true...which makes me wonder why city councils such as Brighton & Hoves don't follow in Londons or even better Manchesters lead and do more to alliveate the problems caused by overpopulation and excessive consumerism...

  • The point is, in the country and more rural aras some people DO need cars to get around, it is an essential. But, in towns and cities we DO NOT need them. it is pure laziness. The example above where someone talked about havig a car bu only using at weekends and family trips is brilliant. During the week dad goes to work on foor, cycle, bus etc, the kids walk to schoo and mum does shopping locally (sorry about using the 2.4 children thing)
    Now everything is in out of town large supermrkets, and leisure complex.
    Families often have 3 or 4 cars. I can not walk down my street at night on the pavement, for all the cars parked on it, we have to walk on the road. Like any older town or city with terraced housing they were not built to accomodate several cars at one address. Sooner or later there are going to be more cars than people.

  • Quote from Tezza_UK

    But, in towns and cities we DO NOT need them. it is pure laziness.



    Bit of an oversimplified view imho. I've only had a car since December, but before then, I was pretty much housebound. However much they improve public transport and make it more disabled friendly, there's still the question of getting to and from bus stops/train stations and the question of waiting, standing for up to half an hour because of traffic probs, that crash that couldn't be predicted, staff sickness etc. And now I'm training to be a community psychiatric social worker. Even if I was able bodied I'm not sure that it would be viable to do that by public transport. When I already have to factor in driving for up to half an hour between clients, I'm not sure that only seeing two clients a day would be seen as a good use of public money! It would have the positive side of ensuring i would be able to get employment if they allowed disabled people to use cars and not able bodied though, so maybe it wouldn't be all bad :D

  • Quote from elfqueenofrohan



    But would you think that if you could afford to drive as much as you want? when you drove before did you have more money or was it cheaper to get train?


    I have absolutly no intention on buying a car, not only because I know there's no way we're going to be able to afford to buy or run one in the next few years, but because we've managed without one so far and we really don't *need* to have one - we live in the middle of the city right next to the shops, the train station is ten minutes walk away and the bus services are fab - no point.


    I will get a car in the future, though. And that is when we have children. I've seen far too many harrassed parents on buses to want to try and juggle a child and shopping on public transport as it stands at the moment.

  • Quote from Aunty Al

    Bit of an oversimplified view imho. I've only had a car since December, but before then, I was pretty much housebound. However much they improve public transport and make it more disabled friendly, there's still the question of getting to and from bus stops/train stations and the question of waiting, standing for up to half an hour because of traffic probs, that crash that couldn't be predicted, staff sickness etc. And now I'm training to be a community psychiatric social worker. Even if I was able bodied I'm not sure that it would be viable to do that by public transport. When I already have to factor in driving for up to half an hour between clients, I'm not sure that only seeing two clients a day would be seen as a good use of public money! It would have the positive side of ensuring i would be able to get employment if they allowed disabled people to use cars and not able bodied though, so maybe it wouldn't be all bad :D


    I aimed that at people who really don't need a car. You obviously do, and it there were not so many peoope on the roads there would be less traffic chaos.
    I know it is not an easy subjext, it will always be emotive. People with a disability would, in my book, be exempted. The people that p**s me off are the families living in a town, with 2 or 3 cars.

  • I live on my own in inner London and have 2 camper vans. One runs on LPG and doesn't pollute. I don't need them but I like the freedom they give me and running them is a bit like a hobby. They're both very slow and noticeable so probably far safer than the average car. They're also very old, and as a result mostly made of recycled parts.

    They save me time and inconvenience, I pay through the nose to keep them going so I think I have the right to use them whenever I want. :)

  • Quote from Coyote

    The issue is not the practice (of driving cars) but rather the population numbers - but hey thats the kind of issue no body dares address for fear of being called a "nazi".

    No-ones done that now have they ?

    tbh I don't believe population explosion is a problem in the UK, everyone owning a car is though, I fully expect a limit on the number of vehicles allowed to be registered to an address, implemented sometime in the not to distant future.

  • Quote from Dapablo

    tbh I don't believe population explosion is a problem in the UK

    But then you live in one of the rural fringes with a low head count per square mile. Try some of the busier so-called rural counties... you can hardly turn round without seeing another bit of nature disappearing under tarmac and concrete and the gaps between the towns and villages quickly shrinking.

  • lol elfqueen, always wanted to live in victorian times :D

    I thought I saw your name on a loaf of bread the other day...then saw it said Thick Cut :thumbup:

  • Quote from shibari.surfer


    When i started working, i couldnt wait to get a motorcycle at 17 but that was a status thing.



    i was reading my friends economics coursework yesterday (as you do) and it showed the use of different forms of transport since the 1950s.
    Plane use has gone up ten-fold, cars have shot right up as well, with pedal-bikes going down in the 70s and never going back up. Train use went right down but it has started to make a little increase.

    Motorbikes though fluctuated for the whole time and never went significantly up or down :D that made me think that maybe motorbikes are just a fashion.


    Quote from BlessedBe

    lol elfqueen, always wanted to live in victorian times :D



    :eek: i imagine i'd be dead if i did

    we reenact Noah's ancient drama, but in reverse, like a film running backwards, the animals exiting

  • Quote from elfqueenofrohan



    :eek: i imagine i'd be dead if i did


    I beleive the exact description you are looking for is a syphylitic, gin sodden corpse :eek:


    Makes ya think dunnit......

    "The only rules that really matter are these: what a man can do and what a man can't do."

  • Quote from Coyote

    I beleive the exact description you are looking for is a syphylitic, gin sodden corpse :eek:

    Makes ya think dunnit......



    thank you for that image!!!!! :faint:

    we reenact Noah's ancient drama, but in reverse, like a film running backwards, the animals exiting

  • Quote from elfqueenofrohan

    i was reading my friends economics coursework yesterday (as you do) and it showed the use of different forms of transport since the 1950s.
    Plane use has gone up ten-fold, cars have shot right up as well, with pedal-bikes going down in the 70s and never going back up. Train use went right down but it has started to make a little increase.

    Motorbikes though fluctuated for the whole time and never went significantly up or down :D that made me think that maybe motorbikes are just a fashion.



    The main problem as Atomik poibnted out, too many cars in towns, so much countryside dissappearing. Concrete jungle. This is one of the big reasons for the floding at the moment, the water has no where to be absorbed, there is no soil in towns anymore.

  • I'm so over whelmed!
    I keep starting to write out replies but then there are more posts with very good and valid points.
    I'm going to have to get used to this :)

  • Trains are supposed to be a much more green form of transport.


    I've been using a lot of trains recently...more passengers than seats, no leg room, no room for anything except a very small bag per person.


    Things like Virgin Voyager trains are shite. The old 125's (1970's design) are much better...I recently took my 14 year old son on a trip to a preserved railway. The carriages were 1940's ones...the amount of space and the level of comfort was amazing...if they could do it then, why can't they do it now?


    If people are to use trains again they'll want...a seat...somewhere to put their stuff...and a bit of leg room.

  • I think that cars should be banned in the Zone one area of London.I think that there are way too many cars, buses all trying to cram into a very small centre. Take Oxford Street, atleast twenty to thirty buses back to back in the middle of the day, choking Londoners. We are all forced onto a small pavement and the Oxford street experience can be one of toxic sodomy and noise. Also the crush. The crush is when the lights suddenly change at a pedestrian crossing and the whole flock waiting to go across the road, suddenly stop and have to move back. Now not everyone knows what is happening at the front. So we all collide and then people go in the opposite direction. I say London should have a Park and Ride scheme. park your car in a Park and ride area, get 1 third off your travel card including on Oyster. We should then have Transit buses which run on Electric and take passengers to top attractions or hot destinations. Oxford Street should be pedestrianised and a tram should be in place to get people from Marble Arch to Tottenham Court road. There are way to many cars and it seems that the congestion charge has had little deterrment.

    The thrills and shrills of laughter. Echoed against the walls that contain my soul. No place to go but this dank pit where nobody knows.



  • Lol Ahhh but what of :D Hanging, rat bites, some other strange disease lol

    I thought I saw your name on a loaf of bread the other day...then saw it said Thick Cut :thumbup:

  • A ban on cars would be a little much, but I think that people really should use public transportation more often. Europe isn't too bad when it comes to people taking the tube or buses when it comes to getting around, but in the US, most people don't go anywhere without their cars and the stereotypical public transit users are those who live in the poor urban communities. It's too bad that public transit isn't as popular, but as a prospective transport engineering, I hope to help change that.